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November 14, 1920 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



K t.IIvi

HE

I

IN ANN ARBOR THIS WEEK

I

CREEN

AND STAGE

(By Edwin B. Neiss)'
If it is true that variety is the spice
f life, the theatrical schedule for this
veek should certainly put pepper into
nost of us. Comedy and farce, super-.
.rama, melodrama, and every other
:ind of drama are posted on the vari-
us bills.
Louise Glaum, who used to be that
hocking siren and who is still envel-
ped in a vampire aroma, plays at the
vaejstic today in a drama entitled
The Leopard Woman."
The story deals with a battle of wits
etween a man who is on a diplomatic
nission and a woman who has reason
o hate him, but owing to the fact that
e thwarts her in all her attempts at
is destruction, she falls in love with
dm. Amen!- Louise Glaum isn't
nuch on looks,.but she sure can drape
erself in futurist costumes.
Two Stars Star
Two former running mates are be-
ag starred separately today at the
Vuerth in the persons of Bebe Daniels
.nd Harold Lloyd. Bebe, since she
as risen to the more dignified de-
artment of the film world, has had
er face, or rather her figure, in more
eel magazines than perhaps any
ther actress. She has thousands of
stills" floating around the country
nd' yet they give an appearance of
ction, we must admit.
But to get back to the screen once
nore, Bebe is playing in her first
ionest-to-goodness star picture, the
cenerization of a 'Saturady Evening
Post story entitled "You Never Can
'ell."
Meanwhile Harold Lloyd cavorts
round in "Get Out and Get Under,"
% comedy which the producers prom-
se to rival that unsurpassable farce
which played at the Wuerth a fewl
weeks ago with the'name "High and
)izzy."
Charles Ray comes snooping along
At the Arcade as "The Village Sleuth,"

a picture of the adventures of a young
hick who meets a chorus girl on a
rest cure, falls in love with her, and
after many orgies and adventures
finally gets her to give up the stage
in order to become his wife. The plot
of the play is not very rich, but Ray's
portrayal of the predicament of a
country lad are usually quite interest-
ing.
Whitney Offers Comedy
Monday night, after the roar and
rush of Homecoming is 'over, the
Whitney offers a very beautiful mu-
sical comedy, with an accent on the
music. "My Golden Girl" is a produc-
tion written by Arnold Kummer and
Victor Herbert, and the latter has
lived up to his reputation in the fur-
nishing of a rich repertoire of musical
numbers which are rendered by a
large chorus and a capable cast of
leading players.
The performance of "His Honor,
Abe Potash," at the Garrick theatre
in Detroit, beginning today, with Bar-
ney Bernard in the lead, is one that
needs no explanation or recommenda-
tion to the average theatre-goer.
Walter Hampden, thht famous actor
of Shakespearean roles, appears at
the Shubert-Detroit this week in "The
Servant in the House," by Charles
Rann Kennedy, tonight, while at the'
remainder of the 'evening perform-
ances, respectively, will be rendered
"The Merchant of Venice," "Taming
of the Shrew," "Hamlet" on Wednes-
day, and then a repetition of these
shows through the last three days.
Marshall Neilan, whose name is be-
ing classed among the great movie
producers, has released another drama
by James Oliver Curwood, which is
well worth seeing. This new picture,
"Nomads of the North," will appear
at the Majestic for the latter half of
the week beginning Wednesday.-
Married Life in North
The action takes for its basis the
difficulties thrown in the path of

young married in the vast north, and
many remarkable animals are used in
the production.
On Wednesday, at the Arcade, Doro-
thy Dalton shows up in a screen ve r-
ion of Barrie's famous play, "Half an
Hour." The story deals with English
society. An aristocratic young lady is
forced to marry a rich bourgeois who
really loves her, and after the young
lady's true affinity is put out of the
way by accident she finally decides
th t it is best to stick by her husband
and go through life in his company.
The Wuerth offers on Wednesday
and Thursday a melodrama entitled
"The Purple Cipher" (which we hope
is not a description of the picture),
featuring Earle Williams. As usual,
the plot deals with an underground
Chinatown den, a gagged and bound
girl, and a vigilant lover who arrives
just in the nick of time. A submarine
takes part in solving this mystery
story.
J. Stuart Blackton presents the
"House of the T. B. (Tolling Bell)" at
the Wuerth on Friday, a melodrama,
well constructed and well pictured.
Anthony Cole, in order to find out who
is yvotrhy of receiving his immense
fortune, stipulates in his will that all
his heirs shall live for two years in
a certain house wherein his body
shall be placed during that, time.
Only two are man enough to do it,
and one of them is a woman. That's
where the romance comes in and the
story grows absorbing.
"A City Sparrow"

Virgin of Stamboll." This is a most
unusual play and is most unique in its
originality.
Closing the week at the Orpheum
is a picturization of Harold Bell
Wright's popular novel entitled "The
Shepherd of the Hills." This story
has been very appealing, and aside
from the circulation of the book its
dramatization met with great success
behind the footlights.

i

thir
The
con
yea
liar
hib
W
wa
ner
buil
the
are
sec

rd floor the cue artists hold forth.
24 billiard tables are in almost
tinuous use, and during the past
r some of the most prominent bil-
rd experts in the country gave ex-
dtions.
Whether it is only a sandwich you
ut, or even a most expensive din-
, ' the restaurant service in the
iding is equal to the need. Besides
cafeteria in the basement, there
dining rooms on the main and
ond floors.
3f all the features of the building
tap room is perhaps the most
que. It is a substitute for "Joe's
the Orient" and as such it is a
uine place of good fellowship,

without any restraint of formality. It
is a place where every man may ex-
press himself in his own way, mak-
ing the Union as much a part of his
college associations as his own room
or fraternity.
r ond for Alumni
The Union, then, in the bond which
it establishes between the alumni and
the University, the place it holds as
the social center of the campus, as the
supervisor of a great portion of stu-
dent activities, and with its efficient
organization, is an institution which
far surpasses anything of its kind in
the United States. It is the biggest
factor in establishing the greatness
of Michigan.

C
the
MICHIGAN UNION uni
and
BUILDING PROV ES an
gen
ACTIVITIES' HOMl
(Continued from Page One)
normal. Musical activities form an
impo.rtant feature of the work of the
Union, so much so that a director of
this work has been secured. The
Union has its own 40-piece orchestra
which supplies the music for all ma-
jor activities in the Vuilding.
Thoroughly awake to the value of g
live news, the Union provides a spe-
cial telegraph wire to give election
and football returns. Only last week
if you had passed the Union building
at 2:30 o'clock in the afternoon you
would have thought that a football
game was in progress there.
Charter Trains _

s
4
r

i
-

MOST men prefer the pipe to any other form of smoking.
There's comfort, contentment, real satisfaction and
economy in a good pipe. W D C Pipes give you this, and
more. A special seasoning process makes the genuine French
briar bowl break in sweet and mellow. Pick a good shape
at your nearest dealer's, at your price.

Our ever welcome friend, Ethel

Clayton, is hack again Friday at the And things are not done by halves
at the Union. For those students
Arcade in a new picture, "A City. Spar- possessed with the where-with-all to
row." She has a great deal of per- ride to Columbus, a special train was
sonality and her productions are al- chartered to Columbus for the game,
ways full of interet from beginning and 238 students took advantage of
to end. the dpportunity.
The Orpheum has a unique week in There are times when occasion
that after its Sunday and Monday arises for a special student move-
show, which feature, vlay Allison in ment, and at such times the Union
"The Walk Offs," it is saging come- and its always ready organization,
backs of popular photoplays for the takes the initiative. Last year, through
remainder of the week. Union leadership, funds were raised
On Tuesday ilaine Hammerstein which made, possible the portrait of
appears there in "The Point of View," President Harry B. Hutchins.
which was discussed a few weeks ago As a club, the. Union offers com-
in these columns, so needs no further forts which are the superior of any
recormendation now. On Wednesday college club in the country. Six
and Thursday, Priscilla Dean plays in bowling alleys are one of the fea-
a return of last year's success, "The tures of the basement, while on the
ti

-U

WM. DE M UTH
WORLD'S LARGEST.

& CO., NEW YORK
MAK ER S-.-OFFINE PIPES

~_._,,
u - ---'

E

-
-
-
=.. .

ldmbk
ARm R cK

Mat. Wednesday, W0e to $1.00
Nights, 50c.to $2.00
Satu.day iat., 50c to $1.50

ALL SUITS

And

A. H. Woods presents
BARNEY BERNARD

E

V E N

I

N G

OVERCOATS

71E FULL DRESS
DINNER JACKE TS
DY FINCILEY HAVE

CLOTHES AND
RE COMMENDED
BEEN EXECUTED

In the Montague Glass & Goodman Comedy

20

ITH )V A RITE UNDERSTANDING OF THE
COLLEGE MAN'S REQUIREMENTS. THE
GA RMENTS FIT PRECISELY, BUT CO4-
FOARTAPLY, AND H4VE A DESIRABLE
AND NECESSARYMtASURE OFDIGNITY.

OFF

"His
AH

Honor,
Potash"

Wadhams

&

c &

CUSTOM FINISH WITHOUT
THE ANNOYANCE OF A TRY-ON
READY-TO-PUT-ON
ShirtsNeckwear-and Other
Accessories of Exceptional
Quality
TRMTOrfir-ff
324 SOUTH ST ATE STREET
ANN ARBOR

Original New York Cast

TwO COMPLETE STORES

STATE STREET

MAIN STREET

Funnier than "Potash &

Perlmutter"

I.

i

U

Vho Wouldn't be Thankful for
t Victrola on Thanksgiving ?

SCHUBERTT
E T R O I

Mat. Wed.
Nights
Sat. Mlat.

50c0
50C
500

to
to
to

$1.i0
$2.50
$2.00

Everybody enjoys its delightful music and every hostess
will be glad to have the VICTROLA help in . the enter-
tainment.
Such a splendid instrument is something for which to 'be
truly th4nkful.
Come in and we'll gladly demonstrate the VICTROLA
and play your favorite music. VICTROLAS fron $25.00
up. Terms of payment arranged to meet your individual
need.

dW e
Sunday and Thursday
"Servant in the House"

1*

.i
~; H~L 1 t
--C

Now is the
Your

Time, to Order
Personal

CHRISTMAS
GREETING
CARDS
Large Stock - Early Delivery
ENGRAVING - EMBOSSING
a Specialty
CHRISTMAS GIFT
BOXES of
FINE STATIONERY

Monday and Saturday Evenings

"Merchant of Venice"
Tuesday Evening and Saturday Matinee
"Taming of Shrew"

now ready
Make your selection
deposit will hold
Christmas

now.
untj

A

I

Schaeberle & Son, Music House

O. D. MORRILL

110 South Matr Street
The Place for All Musical Instruments

III

Wednesday Mat. & Eve. & Friday Eve.
"Hamlet",

17 Nickels Arcade

,I

i

~~1~

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