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November 12, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY,

t.c t g n tY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
year by the Board in Control of Stu.lent Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
ublication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
dited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
as matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.0.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building,.Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial. 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
.ure not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
h. and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
retion of the Editor, if left at or maied to Te Daily office.
signed communications will receive no consideration. No man-
ript will be returned unless the 'riter incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
ssed inthe communications.
"Vhat's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
NAGING EDITOR .,........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
s Editor............................Chesser M. Campbell
h Eitos-Adams H W. Hitchcock
B. P. ACampbell J. E. McManis
J . . ak be ll T. W . Sargent, Jr.
Renaud SherwoodJ.ABenti
day Editor....... .... .... ... . in
torials.............. Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, T. J. Whinery
istant News ....... . ....... ...-----...E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
'rts........................... . ......."Robert _Angell
men'sEditor............. ................Mary D. Lane
legraph................ .......... ............WNest Gallogly
scope....... ............................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
phine Waldo Frances Oberholtzer L. Armstrong Kert
.1 GC. Weber Robert E. Adams H'ughston McBain
ena Barlow Norman C. Damon Frank H. McPike
abeth'Vickery Byron Darnton Gerald P. Overton
E. Clark Thomas E. Dewey Edward Lambrecht
rge Reindel Wallace F. Elliott William H. Riley Jr.
rothy Monfort Leo J. Hershdorfer Sara Waller

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arry B. Grundy

BUSINESS STAF )
Telephone 9 00
BUSINESS MANAGER......LEGRAND A. GAINES JR. r

nent example of this type of club, inviting to its
fold any person from the south, and playing an ac-
tive part on the campus, is the Dixie club. Other
well defined sectional organizations such as the
Newark, Kentucky, and Kansas City clubs have
sprung into existence, as well as a Cosmopolitan
club among the foreign members of our Univer-
sity.
Some of these organizations have already called
for a reunion this year, and the others should be re-
vived at once. Wherever there are enough repre-
sentatives from one section or city in the country
to permit of a successful club, these representa-
tives will benefit Michigan if they ;get together
and organize. There are very few better ways for
fostering a real home town or home section spirit,
for having a good time in the association of "neigh-
bors," and for. spreading the fame of Michigan,
than through the sectional-clubs of the University.
DOLL UP!
Although old man Michigan's physiognomy bears
a couple of ugly patches labelled, respectively, Illi-
nois and Ohio, he still has a pair of fists that show
he is able to put up a mighty good scrap.
Tomorrow, the double occasion of our last home
game of the year and our homecoming, is going to
be a big day - let's make it a gala one. When the
thousands of visitors start arriving in the morning
by the trainful, autoful, and interurbanful, Ann Ar-
bor should blossom out like a freshman in a new
fur coat. Let's show our guests how much en-
thusiasm, pep, and confidence we have left by dec-
orating "until it hurts."
Maize and blue, with a goodly mixture of ma-
roon and white, will be the color scheme of the
day. The fraternities and sororities can get out the
cheesecloth and decorate their houses from top to
bottom, while the others can do their share equally
well by digging up plenty of pennants. And don't
forget that the sacrifice of a deck or two of Camels
or a hot fudge sundae will buy a big yellow
"?mum."
However we do it, perform your part in making
it a Yreal Michigan day and one that will long be
remembered by students and visitors alike.
DEMAND CLEAN TOWELS
Ina recent statement issued by othe University
tfealth service, the fact was disclosed that unsani-
tary conditions in Ann Arbor barber shops were
causing the spread of a certain contagious skin dis-
ease. Physicians of the Health service, after per-
sonal tours of the various local shops, concluded
that the disease was mainly a result of the use of
dirty towels.
"Insist on clean towels."
"JUST AVERAGE"
There is always a temptation for one who has
become as good as the average in any line of ac-
tivity to be satisfied because he is not among the
tailenders. As.a result there are a good many peo-
ple of real ability who are "just average."
It is also a common weakness for a certain type
of individual to be contented when he can equal
a standard set by a chum or a competitor. Neither
of these philosophies will be likely to bring a man
out on top, for they are built around, aims that are
too low.
"Average men" are plentiful. 'It is those who
are better than the average who are sought. Equal-
ing a competitor is not victory; he must be sur-
passed. We must set our goal according to our own
best ability' and ambition rather than gauging the
limit of our achievement by what those around us
can do. Then we shall be sure to do ourselves jus-
tice.

ising .......-.............r......... . Joyce
eds.,............ ...............,..,......Robst.0.Kerr
tion................... ...........F.M.Heth
ts ............................ R. Priehs
tio3.............................V F. Hillery
Assistants
Lambrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. W.. Robertson
Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
nd Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L:sRice
W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
r,,mel Jr. D. S. Watterworth

R. W.
B. G.
Sigmui
Lester
IT flH

J. J
Night editors for this week are: Hugh Hitch-
cock, Monday nighth; T. W. Sargent, Jr. Tuesday
night; B P. Campbell, Wednesday night; Thomas
Adams, Thursday night; B. P. Campbell, Friday
night; John McManis, Saturday night.
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
Issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that n1,9t.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1920.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
Le Cercle Francais, the official French club of
the University, was organized in 1903 for the pur-
pose of stimulating interest among the students of
the language in its practical usage. The organi-
zation provides the opportunity for students to hear
French plays and lectures, besides giving them the
chance to speak the language and hear it spoken
at the meetings in ways not offered in the class-
room . Le Cercle Francais is affiliated with L'Al-
liance Francaise, the national organization. Any
student who shows proficiency in the language may
be recommended to the club.
A MATTER OF LUNGS
Tonight, with the next step up or down in Mich-
igan's football standing less than twenty-four hours
away, the entire University will be given a chance
to display that great fund of loyalty which rises
above defeat, and which is based this year, as al-
ways before, upon the proved fighting quality of
our team.,
The eleven men who represent us against Chi-
cago will put into their yvork' on the gridiron to-
morrow all the skill of long training; all the fight-
ing spirit of the Michigan tradition, all the stamina
and endurance that is theirs. Our part is only a
matter of lungs. If those eleven men have conse-
crated body and soul to the task of victory tomor-
row; how much more should we be willing to do our
part - the role of the loyal and cheering spectator.
Tonight's pep meeting is important as have been
few such gatherings in Michigan's history. The
coach and team will go out to Ferry field heartened
.nd better prepared for their hard battle if they
know Michigan - all Michigan - is standing be-
hind them, trusts them to a man, believes that they
can win.
We do stand behind that team, stronger even
than before the Illinois game. We believe that to-
morrow will see our first Conference victory ac-
complished.. We are going to prove our belief to-
night in a mass meeting which will make -ill audi-
torium resound from A-, in the orchestra to ZZ-15
in the second gallery.
Just a matter of lungs - let's go, Michigan!
REVIVE THE SECTIONAL CLUBS
One of the features of Michigan from which we
derive the most-pride, is its cosmopolitan popula-
tion. Every state in the union and a number of
foreign nations have their representatives in our
ranks.
It has been the custom in past years for stu-
dents from various sections of the country to get
together with others from their respective sections
and to form organizations for the three-fold pur-
pose of becoming better acquainted, of having a
general good time, and of spreading Michigan
propaganda more effectively when they again strike
their native terra firma. Probably the most prom-

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DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
etrolt, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
ited and Express cars leave for
itroit at 6:05 a. mn., 7:05 a. mn.,
10 a. i., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
iteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
very two hours to 8:48 p. mn.a Ex-
resses at 9:48 a.tm. and ery two
ours to 9:48 p. m.
als to Detroit-5: 55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
id every two hours to 9:00 p.,n.,
lso 11:00 p. mn. To Ypsilanti only,
:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
als to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
2:10 p.m.

is ub

NOVEMBER
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 6 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

CLOTHES FOR YOUNG MEN
AND MEN JWH O S'TAY YOUNG

o . ,

.... r .

..
... ..
rN'.; i is rte", .. ., :. ' :, , ... .. ; a yls riq . ' R, SY"Y A ; * .;. °..,

G H
(Two Stores)
Agents for ROYCROFTEKS
BOTH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK

Now is the Time to
Good Clothes

Buy

PRICE MEANS NOTSHING UNLESS APPLIED
TO KNOWN VALUES
Society Brand Clothe
have always meant full value at regular prices, and any
lowering of prices on these well - known clothes is an op-
portunity
WE ARE OFFERING YOU ONE NOW

All
mind

hands on deck for the decorations, and never
the cheesecloth.

1.4

-

OF

All set for the first alumni?

The Telescope
Mary fell into the cistern,
Her cries she sent aloft,
But she was undamaged, for
The water, it was soft.
Some Closeness, Eh Bo
First stude--Is Harry close-mouthed about his
business?
Second ditto-Is he? Why say, that bird's closer
mouthed about his business than the Athletic asso-
ciation.
Dear Noah:
Why is it that Rhode Island stands ate the foot
in goat raising? Interested.
We don't know, unless 'it be that that's the only
safe place to stand.
History No Professor Teaches
Apollo was an awful god
Who gave the Greeks no peace.
When he got mad he'd send the sun
And fry them all in Greece.
There is a boatman Charon who
Is in an awful fix;
'Cause souls may come and souls may go,
But still our Charon Styx.
Famous Closing Lines
"Ha, a floor finisher," he said as he saw the lit-
tle boy using his ax on the ballroom floor.
NOAH COUNT.

On Our Entire Stock of
MEN'S, YOUNG MEN'S, AND CHILDREN'S
Clothing
GORDON'S SHEEP - LINED, PATRICK MACKINAWS,
Sweaters and all Rain Coats are included in this sale

I

a

Spiecials

Heavy Fleece Union Suits, $3.00 value, this sale at. .$1.9$
CLASSTOQUES .f.""""."."-.",s$1.00
iF(Wuertk'**

CAES

NEXT TO WUERTH THEATER

ALTERATIONS
EXTRA

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