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November 12, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
CLOUDY AND COOLER;
SNOW FLURRIES

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS

PAT AND NIGHT'
SERVICE

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VOL. XXXI. No. 34. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

ARMISICE DA
SERICES HELD
FOR WARHEROES'
THOUSANDS PARADE AND HEAR
SPEECHES IN HILL
AUDITORIUM
MAYFLOWER COMPACT
SHARES IN HONORS
Banquet, Dances and 'Receptions for
Vets Close Festivities After
Big Day
Ex-service men of Michigan, nurs-
es, Michigan students, and citizens of
Ann Arbor joined yesterday in honor-
ing the memory of Michigan men, and
all other Americans, who lost their
lives in the World war, by observing
the second anniversary of the signing
of the armistice. Sharing honors with
the Armistice day celebration was the
observance of the 300th anniversary
of the signing of the Mayoflwer com-
pact.
Classes Dismissed
Classes in the University terminat-
ed at noon, stores and all places of
business closed and a general holiday
was declared.. Events of the after-
noon and evening were formally be-
gun at 1:30 o'clock with a parade,
made up of all service men in Ann
Arbor, led by the University band.
The line of march ended at Hill aud-
itorium, where memorial services
were held. Immediately following the
services ex-service men were guests
of honor at an informal house-warm-
ing at Betsy Barbour house. At 6
o'clock members of the Veterans of
Foreign Wars attended a banquet at
the Union. Dances and various other
receptions for the service men added
gala spirit to the day.
The parade, led by Grand Marshal
Colonel A. H. Lovell, of the engi-
neering college, and the University
band, was composed of five sections,
representing practically every branch
of the service. The thought of Amer-
ica's allies was recalled by the pres-
ence of two French uniforms in the
line of march.
Butler Presides
Leslie A. Butler, superintendent of
the Ann Arbor public schools, pre-
sided at the services in Hill audi-
torium. The invocation was given by
Rev. L. A. Barrett of the Presbyterian
church. following the singing of the
Star Spangled Banner. Rev. J. M.
Wells spoke first, with an appeal for
supoit of the community drive now
being held for the aid of organizations
doing community service In this city.
Rev. Sidney S. Robbins followed with
a short address bearing on the May-
flower compact.
The main speaker of the afternoon
was Dr. C. W. Merriman, pastor ofI
the Park Congregational church,
Grand Rapids. The kind of tribute,
we should pay those who have died
was the keynote of his address. He
said that the international reputation
of Americans for worshiping the al-
mighty dollar received its first dent,
when our soldiers crossed the sea to
pay their debt to the world by savingi
democracy. Since the conclusion of1
that struggle we have danced, sang
and spent money recklessly, he de-t
clared. .

Michigan Men in Hospial Improving
The hospital authorities report thej
following Michigan men, who have
been ill in the University hospital, tof
be steadily improving: H. H. Ash,
'22, W. Guthrie, '23, and R. R.-Kreps.7
The condition of Phil Raymond, for-1
mer Michigan student and athlete,
who has been confined in the hospi-
tal for several weeks,. is also encour-i
aging. -

MICHIGAN HARRIERSS
TO MEET ILLINOIS
iIIlailnat nrntiinrnF

CHIMES WILL END
CONTEST NOV.

15

Michigan will have a chance to
show that she is behind her cross
country team when the Illinois squad
meets the Wolverines at 10:45 o'clock
tomorrow morning. The race will
start and finish at the homeopathic
hospital.
Coach Steve Farrell has been disap-
pointed in the interest shown by the
campus in general over cross country
running. As. the coach points out, it
is a big sport in most of the eastern
colleges as well as many of the west-
ern, institutions and is deserving of
student support here.
FOR FALL GAMES
123 Men Elect Captain Who Appoints
Lieutenants for Annual Clash
with Freshmen
SPEAKERS SAY EVERY ENERGY
MUST BE EXERTED TO WIN
Full of pep, fight, and determination
to repeat their subcess of last year, the
class of '23 met last night in Uni-
versity Hall to organize for the fall.
games, which are to be held Satur-
day morning.
Herbert G. Dunphy was elected
captain and the lieutenants he named
were: Engineers, F. L. Smith, H.
Garman, F. T. Adams, John Hills, B.
Avery, F. Kenrick, and Anderson;
lits, C. Kreis, R. Hunt, Thorne Brown,
J. Sutton, Martin, De Ruiter, Sutton,
Christie, and Avery; dent, S. J. Grif-
finger.
The meeting was in charge of John
Cary, '21L. Howard A. Donnelly,
'21L, spoke to the men and told them
that it would take every effort of the
class to win. "Your class should be
the only. class to you men," he said,
"and it is up to you to prove it to
the freshmen." Calvin G. Wetzel,
'21E, explained the games to the men.
H. G. Dunphy, captain, told the soph-
,mores that they must not wait until
Saturday to start the fight. "We must
start fighting now," he said. "and
keep on fighting until the games are
over." Hunt, cheerleader, led the men
in several yells.
Tryouts for the shuttle race and the
nillow fight will be held at Waterman
gymnasium at 4 o'clock this after-
noon.Former track menare needed
for the first event but the second is
open to everyone.
Mrarine Nand Has
Italian .Origin

41 UIIVI LllIUb
Is Considered One of Most Brilliant
and Scholarly of American
Preachers
ALYN FOSTER ALSO ON NEXT
D SRELIGIOUS PROGRAM
Announcement of the program for
the Union service Sunday night was
made yesterday by the committee in
charge. The program includes a main
address by Dr,. Charles Clayton Mor-
rison,a short welcome talk by Allyn
K. Foster, and several musical num-
bers.
Brilliant Scholar
Dr. Morrison, considered one of the
most brilliant and scholarly American
preachers, is- a graduate of Drake uni-
versity and the University of Chicago,
and a man who has won many laurels
as a preacher in Springfield, Ill., and
Chicago. He is now the editor of the
Christian Century, the most prosper-
ous and progressive of American re-
ligious publications. Dr. Morrison has
written many books of religious na-
ture, the most famous of them being,
"The Daily Altar." This preacher's
fame as a speaker and editor is expect-
ed by those in charge of the program
to prove an unusual attraction to stu-
dents.N
Porter to Preside
Allyn K. Foster, national student
of the Northern Baptist convention,
will give the scripture reading, pray-
er, and a short address of welcome be-
fore the talk of Dr. Morrison.
The student chairman in charge of
the meeting will be Donald J. Port-
er, '21; Earl V. Moore, of the School
of Music, will be at the organ.
SETTE BOUNDARY LINE
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 11.-The Italian
embassy communicated today to the
state department a dispatch from its
government saying that Italy and

Those intending to enter manu-
scripts in the short story contest be-
ing conducted by the Chimes have but
four days more in which to do so.
Monday, Nov. 15, has been set as the
closing -date of the contest, and the
contest editor states that he will ad-
here strictly to this rule. Manuscripts
mailed in will be accepted if post.
marked Nov. 15.
Three prizes of $15, $10 and $5, re-
spectively , are being offered by
Chimes. All manuscripts become the
property of the publication upon re-
ceipt, but those which are not pub-
lished will be returned. Stories are
not to be signed, but must carry a
title. This should be placed on a
slip of paper together with the au-
thor's name, address and phone num-
ber, which should be enclosed with
the manuscript. Contributions should
be mailed to the Contest Editor of
the Chimes, care of the Michigan
Union.
THRILLS AUDIE[NCE
Tone Poems of Infinite Beauty Are
Painted by Eminent
Pianist
RENDERS OWN COMPOSITION;
PRELUDE IN C SHARP MINOR
(By L. L. N)
In spite of the lengthy program of
the Rachmaninoff concert in Hill au-
ditorium last night, the audience kept
clamoring for more and was not ap-
peased until Rachmaninoff sat down
at the piano and rendered another of
his poetic interpretations. His truly
artistic playing, his wonderful inter-
pretations, and his unique personal-
ity, all blended together in painting
tone poems of inflinte beauty, so em-
inent in color value that after striking
the ear they progessed to the heart
and nestled there.

CHICAGO GAME MASS MEETING
SCHEDULED FOR TONIGHT: THREE
MEN WILL GIESHORT TALKS

EXTRA TO BE ISSUED
In accordance with its usual pol-
icy, The Daily will issue a sport
extra immediately following the
Chicago game tomorrow after-
noon.
This edition will contain a
play-by-play story of the con-
test, as well as a number of gen-
eral feature articles by leading
members of The Daily sport staff.
The running story will be tele-
proned to The Daily office by a
special wire from the press box
at Ferry field and taxicabs will

rush the
crowds as
gates.

sheet to meet the
they issue from the

d

I

a

Jugo-Slavia had reached an agree- At the sound of the f
ment on the Adriatic question. The
dispatch was not made public, but at chords of Rachmaninoff's
the embassy it was said the boundary post "reldiC sh
line agreed upon was virtually that a most dramatic hush s
proposed in the minimum demands of picturing in his own langu
the Italian government. fering anhmot pitiu
The new line, as explained, is thefe n ad ostitisul c
Julian Alps and down the Galatian his own people, it seemed
one stopped breathing for
coast well to the eastward of the orig- single note would be misse
inal line proposed by President Wil-
son and closely approximates the line Opening with Beethove
laid down at the treaty in England, in E minor," he rendered
signed by Italy, France, and Great tion which is not onlyv
Britain in 1914. but is in constant demand
State department officials would not its naive and compelling n

irst sombre
s own com-
harp minor,"
ettled upon
progressed,
wage the suf-
onditions of
lthat every-
fear that a
ed.
n's "Sonata
a composi-
well known
because of
melody.
tterance in
be well ap-
in saying,
are in the

DETROIT ALUMNI NEAR
SINGAY EDITOR Of NEWS
Emphasizing the need for every
newspaper man in the state to do his
part in the solving of the University's
problems, and declaring that the press
of Michigan was behind the Univer-
sity, Malcolm W. Bingay, managing
editor of the Detroit News, yesterday
noon addressed a record turnout of
Michigan alumni at the weekly meet-
ing of the University of Michigan
club of Detroit at the Hotel Cadillac.
The luncheon was one of the pep-
piest in the history of the club and
great interest was manifested in the
Chicago gamettomorrow. Robert Clan-
cy, field secretary, acted as toastmas-
ter, and introduced Bingay, who said
in part:
"The University of Michigan means
a lot to the newspapers of the state.
Every aim and ambition of a news-
paper should be the same as that of
a university like the University of
Michigan."
Harry Carey, '20, was appointed
chairman of the smoker committee in
place of Carl Johnson, '20, who is ill
at the present time. Other men on
the committee are James O'Dea, '09E,
president of the club, Jack Watkins,
'17, Russell Collins, '17, William W.
Hinshaw, Jr., '20, Russell C. Barnes,
'20, and Harold Jackson, '18.
MEDICS ELECT OFFICERS
FOR VARIOUS CLASSES
Results of class elections held in
the Medical college are as follows:
Seniors: president, O. H. Ensing;
vice-president, Mary Baker; secre-
tary, W. P. Cook; treasurer, A. W.
Corey. Juniors: president, Angus
Goetz; vice-president, W. R. Torger-
son ;secretary, Isla De Pree; treas-
urer, J. B. Stone.
Sophomores: president, Wm. Dav-
is; vice-president, H. Smith; secre-
tary, Ruth Stone; treasurer, George
Stimson. Freshmen: president, L.
Bates; vice-president, Winifred Bie-
then; secretary, R. S. Breakey; and
treasurer, L. A. Brunstrung.
Quarterdeck Club Takes Six
The Quarterdeck club, marine en-
gineering society, initiated six men
yesterday afternoon, and held its in-
itiation banquet last night in the
Union. The men chosen were: J. D.
Oneara, H. Brook, G. W. Ferguson, A.
C. Dennis, P. Herrick, and W. S.
Thomas.
Junior Engineers Hold Smoker
Junior engneers held their first

1BAND TO START PARADE AROUND
CAMPUS WHERE CHEERING
WILL COMXENGE
FRANK MURPHY TO
BE ALUMNI SPEAKER
Eaton, '21, to Preside, Carl Hogan,
120E, Also on Program; Doors
Open at 7 O'clock
Michigan men, Michigan women,
Michigan songs and cheers and above
all Michigan spirit will crowd Hill
auditorium at 7:30 o'clock tonight at
the Chicago game mass meeting.
Three speakers, the Varsity band,
and A. 0. Cuthbert, '21E, official
cheerleader, will make for as short
snappy meeting which will be over
by 8:30 o'clock. Frank Murphy, '04
of Detroit will represent the alumni
in getting enthusiasm for the Satur-
day conflict up to white heat. That
Michigan must win will be the by-
word of the occasion.
Band to Parade
The band will meet at 7 o'clock and
parade around the campus, ending up
at the auditorium, where the cheer-
ing will be started at 7:15 o'clock.
The line of march that the band will
follow will be marked with red lights.
Paul W. Eaton, '21, president of the
Union, will be chairman of the meet-
ing. Carl T. Hogan, '20E, president
of the Union last year, will be the
other speaker. Hogan delivered the
student address at last year's Cap
night exercises and was frequently
called upon to talk at pep meetings.
Crowd Expected
"We expect a crowd," said R. ,P.
Dillon, '21E, chairman of the Student
council committee for the pep meet-
ing, "and so the doors will be opened
a half an hour before the meeting is
to start. Any alumpni who wish to
make sure that they will have seats
may call up H. H. Battin at 1366 and
he will reserve places for. them. This
Chicago game is the last one of -the
season to be played here and inas-
much as it is also a homecoming for.
the alumni, everyone should make an
effort to get to the pep meeting."
Slides of the players and the team
in action will be thrown on the
screen. It is planned by the commit-
tee to rouse up all the spirit possible
so that Chicago and the alumni may
see the campus at its best on Stur-
day.
M'en In Uniform
Live War Again
"Say, buddie, this is the stuff, what
do you say?" was the way the ex-
service men expressed their approval
of the housewarming extended to
them by Betsy Barbour house yester-
day afternoon.
Homelike informality reminded the
men of hours of leave spent at Y. M
C. A. canteens and this idea was car-
ried out by Miss Eleanor Sheldon,
who appeared in her uniform, by the
familiar signs and especially by the
dining room, which represented a Y.
M. C. A. canteen where the guests
were served coffee and doughnuts,
while cider was to be had in the sun-
parlor.
"Ascenseur derange" was the sign
on the elevator which caused men to
smile in reminiscence. More than 300
men were entertained. There was

According to some history and say whether this settlement would be
much traditions the origin of the objectionable to the American gov-
United States Marine band, which ernment, explaining that they had not
plays here Saturday night, is Italian. had time to study the matter in de-
In fact there is a pretty well au- tail.
thenticated story that the Marine band.
was kidnapped by Captain McNeill, University Library
of the American frigate "Boston."
While in one of the Tripolitan Unrivaled C
ports, during the war with the Bar-_
bary pirates, the gruff old sea cap- What is considered the finest and
tain heard a band of Italian musi-
cians playing on the streets. He was largest collection of papyri in Ameri-
so delighted with their music that he ca, and which rivals any collection
invited them to come on board ship in the world is now in the possession
that evening and play for his men. of the University. The collection, now
When the time came for the Italians in the library, was brought to Ann
to be going ashore they found to their Arbor from London by Prof. Francis
consternation that the ship was many W. Kelsey, head of the Latin depart-
miles out from land. ment. Professor Kelsey, with the
The story may not be entnrely au- aid of Prof. B. P. Grenfell, of the
thentic, for many of the archives British Museum, secured the papyri in
which might show what became of Egypt last winter and spring.
these wandering musicians after they The papyrus is a form of paper made
reached our shores were destroyed in from the stalks of the papyrus plant,
1814. But there is no doubt as to the which grows in great abundance
band's Italian origin, as the official along the banks of the Nile. It was
records show that it was recruited used extensively by the ancients and
early in the last century by 13 Ital- as late as the 10th and 11th centuries
ian musicians who formed the nu- of the Christian era. Great quanti-
cleus for the ;'e3ent crganization. ties have been preserved in Egypt for

Robert Schumann's ut
respect to Chopin might
plied to Rachmaninoff
"Hats off, gentlemen, we
presence of a genius"!

Is Given
ol$etion of Papyri
hundreds of years, owing to the dry
climate there. However, few of the
records and writings of the ancient
nations have been uncovered until the
latter part of the 19th century.
The collection which Professor Kel-
sey has secured consists of 534 sepa-
rate documents and a large number
, of fragments. The earliest dates from
the early part of the third century,
B. C.
Most of the documents are written
in Greek, although a rew are in Lat-
in, Coptic, Arabic, Hebrew and Dem-
otic. The great bulk of the collec-
tion consists of correspondence, re-
ceipts, accounts, .,contracts, tax re-
ceipts, census returns, petitions, dec-
larations under oath, official orders
and papers of a like nature.

class smoker last night at the Union., the blue of the French uniform, the
Three prominent faculty men, F. H. darker blue of the United States
Stevens, H. E. Riggs, and W. C. Hoad, navy, the khaki of the soldier and the
addresed the assembly. olive color.

1..-.

_.A

11

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'Extra Concert 17
Series
Course Tickets
$2.0 $2.5

UNITED STATESr MARINE BAND
IN HILL AUDITORIUM _
Saturday November, 13
"THE PRESIDEAT'S OWN BAND" Tickets at University School of Musio

'I

Prices For Band

Concert

$1.00 - 75c - SOc

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