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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 07, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univr.
aity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication o all news dispatchs credited to it or not otherwise
redie'd in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
oless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.5.
Offices: Ann ArborPress building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 966; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 3 words, if signed, the sig-
pature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
dicretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uasrpt will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
TheDaily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
,presed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ...........GEORGE O. BROPHY, JR.
News Editor.............................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
J. A. Bernstein J. E. MManis
B. P. Campbell T. W. Sargent, Jr.
J.-I.-Dakin
Editoriqls..........Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, C. II, Murchison
Sports............ -.............. Robert Angell
ssistantNews ......... ..... E. P. Lovejoy
Women's Editor ................................ary D. Lane
Telegraph...................................... West Gallogly
Assistants
osepin Waldo Thomas J. Whinery Harry B. Grundy
Paul G. Weber R. W. Wrobleski Winefred Biethan
Ahrmena Barlow George Reindel Robert D. Sage
Elizabeth Vickery Dorothy Monfort Marion Nichols
G. E. Clark Minnie Muskatt Frances Oberholtzer
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER..........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
Advertising.................................D. P. Joyce
Credits and Clssified Ads ....................J.XW. Rawings
Nublication...........................F. M. Heath
Accounts ......... .... . ... ...... .. .. R. Priesrs
Circulation ...------.-----.--....-- - . Schneider
Assistants
Rb . am echt B.mn. Gow er Lester . rMillard
obt0.Kerr SgudKntde .F ilr
The night editors for the week will be: Brewster
Campbell, Monday night; Thornton Sargent, Tues-
day night; Thomas Adams, Wednesday night; John
Dakin, Thursday night; Jotn McManis, Friday
night; and Joseph Bernstein, Saturday night.
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all. pews to be printed that night.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1920
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
Though the Legislature created the University
in 1837, it was not opened until 1841. It has
grown to its present enrollment of neaHy I 1,000
from an original attendance of six students.
(Note:-The Daily will run one fact about the
University in this place every day.)
A CHANCE FOR THE SOPH
In the days when Michigan was as woolly as
the "old timers" would have us believe-if there
ever were such days-it may really have required
mob discipline to beat the incorrigible freshman
into a sense of decent mollification. For the safe-
ty of the little commonwealth of Ann Arbor it
may have been best to cow him out of his deter-
mination to paint the campus red. For fear he
might pull the then-popular slingshot on some un-
suspecting senior, it may have been best to turn his
nose into a peanut-propeller in the middle of State
street.
But the wild west has faded, and with it has
gOne its counterpart in Ann Arbor. The idea of
destroying the fUniversity is no longer uppermost
in the mind of the first-year man. Deadly hatred
of upperclassmen, faculty, books, and degrees is no
longer his ruling passion. The average freshman
comes here with the idea of making himself a dyed-
in-the-wool Micigan student. He is loyal before he
sets eyes on, the campus. He wants to get the
Michigan "air," learn the Michigan songs, and get
to work. as soon as possible on Michigan's campus
or athletic activities. All he needs is the pointing
of a finger to set him going at top speed for the
best interests of the University. The mentor sys-
tem is going to supply the guidance; and if ever the

freshman forgets that not the almighty "I," but
Michigan, should come first, the regularly appoint-
ed committee on freshman conduct will take all
complaints and swiftly lift him back from the era
of insubordination to the realities of 1920.
The sophomore who refuses to recognize the
change is both a tragic and comic spectacle. He
is tragic, because he is hurting his alma mater by
keeping the obsolete custom of mob discipline in
vogue; and he alone will be responsible for any-
thing that may happen to him as a result of his mis-
take. He is comic, because he thinks he is doing
a worthyi act. Year by year this kind of student
has been becoming more and more of an undesira-
ble. To be sure, he sometimes takes revenge on
freshmen because he was himself mistreated the
preceding year. But some class is going to have
the honor of forgetting self for the good .of Mich-
igan. Men of 23, this is your greatest opportunity.
ROLL, PRESSES, ROLL !
Michigan's student publications have every
:hance in the world of making this a big year. They
have already proved themselves to be first rate
periodicals in comparatively lean years for copy
getting. Now we have the largest enrollment in
our history which means that there will be more
>pportunities to obtain material of general interest
:o the campus. Then too, we have several new
oaches whose work will be watched carefully, and

above all we have a new president' whose adminis-
tration must of necessity bring forth many depart-
ures from the old regime.
But unless the students take it upon themselves
to go out for the Chimes, the Gargoyle, the Michi-
anensian and the other publications, the best re-
ults in keeping with Michigan progress cannot be
obtained. The editors alone cannot be expected to
turn out high grade periodicals unless they have
the active backing of the students both in subscrip-
tions, and in literary contributions. It is up to us.
If we can write serious articles about campus ques-
tions we must do it and submit them to the Chimes.
If we have a gift for saying witty things we must
say them through the Gargoyle. If we have ar-
tistic ability we should use it for the Michiganen-
sian. And if we can do none of these things well,
many of us can go out and get subscriptions or ad-
vertisements much more readily than can the men
who write. Let's make it a heavy year for the
printers.
A DEAN OF STUDENT AFFAIRS
As another evidence of President Burton's in-
terest in the progress of the individual student he
has approved the project to inaugurate a new Uni-
versity position, that of dean of student affairs.
This dean would be in no sense of the word a po-
liceman but would serve, rather, as an authority
to whom the student can turn for advice and aid
both in school and outside matters.
This office is not a new thing. A dean of stu-
dent affairs already exists in several universities.
Many events in the past have shown the need of
such -an official at Michigan. Instances have occur-
red in which a student was arrested for overdraw-
ing his account. Other students have been over-
charged by landladies. Misunderstandings of this
character could be speedily settled through the
agency of the deati of student affairs who could in-
vestigate the justness of the student's complaint
and act on his behalf.
Acting in the capacity of adviser and mediator,
this dean would be the first official whose sole duty
it is to come in direct contact with the individual
student, talk matters over with him, get his view-
point, and act as his case merits. The man filling
this position would be a large asset to the Univer-
sity and, as such, should be welcomed by the en-
tire student body.
Ye Edtor's Prayer
Each night we pray this prayer,
"Lord, save from retribution
Those kindly souls fvho send
Each day a contribution."
If we only had one contribution a week from
everybody who reads this column and then mut-
ters, "How does he get that way" we figure we
would have enough material for two humor mag-
azines and the Gargoyle for two years.
Be Still, My Palpitating Heart
23-I hear that the chorus of "Take It From
Me" aren't going to wear their dresses any longer.
24 (agitatedly)-Is that so?
'23-Yeh, they say they're plenty long enough
already.
Dear Noah:
I am looking for a figure to personify Faith.
What would you recommend?
AWTISTE.
Why not a freshman writing in to the athletic
office for seats on the 50-yard line for the Chicago
game?
Our Daily Novelette
I
The crocusses had long since ceased their croak-
ing as Hugh strode buoyantly up the gravel walk
which led to his abode. A smile lighted his home-
ly features as he reflected that she would be wait-

ing for him. Yes, good old pal that she was, she
would be there waiting and watching, listening for
his footstep.
II
"Hello, Poll," he boomed expectantly as he threw
open the door.
A.deathlike silence greeted him.
Poll, gorgeously attired in resplendent finery
stared vacantly and unknowingly at him from an
armchair.
"Hello, old girl," he repeated in a subdued voice.
Still no response from that beautiful, brilliant-
eyed creature who continued to regard him coldly.
What had happened?
III
Finally he dropped to his knees, his face close
to hers.
"Poll "
"My God, Poll, don't you know me? It's Hugh,
your own little Hughie ?"
"Speak to me, tell me you know me!"
After what seemed an eternity to the man she
turned toward him.
"Arrwk - * $ ** ! !," yelled the parrot.
A sigh of relief overspread Hugh's face. "That's
more like," he said as he settled himself comfort-
ably in the armchair.
Thanks to L. G.
Famous Closing Lines
"Ha, a royal flush," he muttered as the queen
blushed deeply after hearing the story.
NOAH COUNT.

AM

". 4

.....

J

TWO STORES
hfooks and Supplies for .all Colleges at
I 1 i Stores

Both Ends of Diagonal Walk

DETROIT UNITED LiNES
In Effect :hay 18, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6':10 a. m. and hourly to
9:10 p. Mn.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:40 a. in. and
every two hours to 8:40 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:45 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:45 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55 a.m., 7:05 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:05 p.m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m. and 1:10 a.n.
Locals to Jackson -- 7:45 a.m., and
12:10 p.m.
OCTOBER
S M T W T T F S
1 2
° 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
30
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

"G. R. Swain returned Sept. 25 after a year's absence in Europe
and the Near East where he has been occupied in photographic work
for the University." s

IF IT'S ANYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC

ASK SWAIN-PHONE 2312

FOR

CAREFUL INTELLIGENT DEVELOPING AND PRINTING,

LEAVE YOUR FILMS AT

713 EAST,

U. AVE., OR AT THE QUARRY DRUG STORE I

DIXIE CLUB TO HOLD FIRST
OF SMOKER SERIES FRIDAY
Meeting for the first time this se-
mester, the Dixie club will hold a
smoker at 7:30 Friday evening in
rooms 319 and 321 of the Union.
Officers of the club urge that all
men from the south come to the smlok-
er and get acquainted, and especially
the new men.
Bids for refreshment concession for
athletic contests on Ferry Field held
under the direction of the Athletic
Association o7 13 uiver nity of Mich-
igan for the-college year 1920-1921,
will be received at the Athletic Asso-
ciation offices, Ann Arbor Press build-
ing, up to 6:00 p..im. Thursday, oc-
tober 7, 1920.-Adv.
English Brogue Shoe special, $10.00
pair. For Sat. Oca. 9th. Davis Tog-
gery Shop, 119 S. Main St.-Adv.
The "STANDARD" Loose-Leaf
Notes at Wahr's University Book
Stores.-Adv.
Classes in Gregg Shorthand, type-
writing, bookkeeping, accounting, etc.,
Monday, Oct. 11th. Hamilton Business
College, State and William Sts..-Adv.
Moore's and Conklin's Fountain
Pens. All sizes at Cushing's--Adv.
Engineer's Supplies at Wahr's Uni-
versity Book Stores.-Adv.
Finest assortment of pipes at Cush-
ing's Drug Store.-Adv.

Mrs. Fox was bragging one day about the
large number of her cubs.
"How many cubs do you bring into the
world at one time?" she asked the LIONESS.
"Only ONE," replied the Lioness-" but it's
a LION."
MURADS COST 20 CENTS for a BOX
of 1O- BUT THEY'RE MURADS!
MURADS would be lower priced if we left out a
or part of the 100% Turkish tobaccos of the purest and
best varieties grown-or if we substituted inferior grades
of Turkish tobacco.
But they wouldn't be MURADS-they'd only be
Foxes!
"Jfudge for Yourself -!P'

Special attention is called
to Murad 20sisn Tin Boxes

N&

<< I.,

.,

Men and Women of the
University of Michig"an
We are mighty glad to welcome you to Ann
Arbor. During the next Collegiate year we
wish you good luck in the pursuit of your
courses.
Your future depends on the careful selec-
tion of courses at the University.
Be just as careful in selecting the ice cream
you eat. It means continued health if you
ask for
IC E'
o ~riBC C R E A

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