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October 07, 1920 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-07

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND SLIGHTLY
WARMER TODAY

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ASSOCIAT]
PRESS
PAY AND SIHT
SERTICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 3

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1920

PRICE THREE C

POLES AND REDS
AGREE ON TRUCE:.
FIGHTING TO STOP
WARFARE SOON TO STOP, AFTER
TWO YEARS OF HOSTILITIES
IN RUSSIA
JAPANESE ATTACKED
BY NORTH KOREANS
Dispatehles From Riga Say Both Sides
Finally Come to Agreement;
Start Negotiations
(By Associated Press)
Warsaw, Oct. 6-Dispatches from
Riga say that hostilities between the
Poles and the Russian Soviet forces
will cease Friday under an armistice
signed by the Polish and Soviet peace
delegates yesterday.
The cessation of hostilities between
Russia and the Poles will mark the
close of the most serious warfare fol-
lowing the world war. Fighting be-
gan in December, 1918; and reached
an acute stage when the Poles made
their first sweep eastward towards
Kiev which they captured, followed by
their gradual retreat until the Soviet
forces had again forced their way
westward and were threatening War-
saw.
The present negotiations were ini-
tiated about that time and have re-
sulted in anarmistice effective Fri-
day.
Tokyo, Oct. 6-Advices from north-
ern Korea say that a body of Russian
bolsheviks, Koreans, made a second
attack on Hunchun, a town of Man-
churia, near' the Korean frontier on
the night of Oct. 4 and engaged Jap-
anese troops, dispatched from Korea,
after the first attack on the town.
VARSITY BAND READY FOR
OPENING GAME ON SATURDAY

PROFESSOR SCOTT BACK FROM LONDON CONFERENCE

Michigan Representative Prominent
at Anglo-American Meet
Prof, Fred N. Scott of the rhetoric
department, has returned to this coun-
try from the Anglo-American confer-
ence of professors of English, held at
the University of London, where he
represented this University, one of the
nineteen to send a man from this
country.
Taking part in the three day session
Chimes Begins
Story Contest
With the purpose not only of better-
ing its own fiction, but also of bring-
ing to the notice of its editors persons
of literary ability, Chimes, the All-
campus opinion magazine, has launch-
ed a prize short story contest.
Thirty dollars in prizes will be of-
fered for the three best short stories
turned in, the prizes being $15, $10,
and $5 respectiely
Any graduate or undergraduate of
the University is eligible to compete
with the exception of the members of
the editorial staff of Chimes., The
stories submitted must be typewritten
and consist of not less than 1,000
words and not more than 4,000, and
must either be delivered or mailed to
the Chimes office on the third floor of
the Union by Nov. 15.
The three prize winning manuscripts
and any other stories submitted which
may be considered of sufficient worth
for publication, will immediately be-
come the property of the magazine.
In order to insure against partizan-*
ship, only the title of the story will
appear on the manuscript. The writ-
ers are asked to place their names,
addresses, and telephone numbers, to-
gether with the title of their short
stories, on a separate slip of paper
and to enclose it with the manuscript.
Prof. John R. Brumm, Dr. Harold P.
Scott, and Mr. Edward S. Everett, all
of the rhetoric department, are the
judges. The story taking first prize
will appear in the December issue of
Chimes, and will be followed later by
those selected as second and third
best
UPPEROGLASS ADISERS
HEAR PRESIDENT BURTON
CHAIRMAN EXPLAINS DUTIES;
FRESHMEN ASSIGNED
LATER
President Marion L. Burton spoke to
the upperclass-advisers to freshmen
last evening in the Union. He gave
various pointers for the workers to
carry out in their relations with the
first-year men.
The president was introduced by
Paul W. Eaton, '21, president of the
Union, who stated that the real duty
of advisers is to aid the freshmen in
finding their places on the campus,
and the relation each was to have in
the University life.
After the address of President Bur-
ton, Eaton introduced Albert Jacobs,
'21, chairman of the committee, who
briefly related how the plan is ex-
pected to work. Each adviser will
have four freshmen assigned to him
within the next few days, and each
of these men is to be visited inside
of two weeks and a report made to
the chairman.
President Appoints New Secretary

Miss Natalie Murphy, '15, has been
recently appointed secretary to Pres-
ident Marion L. Burton. Miss Murphy
fills the vacancy left by the departure
of Miss Beulah Davis for Detroit
where the latter is to be secretary
for Frank Cody, superintendent of
schools.

of the conference as well as in the
many receptions and dinners given
for the delegates by English officials,
Professor Scott took a prominent place
in the affairs of the convention.
The English government took the
opportunity afforded by the presence
of so many leading Americans to
strengthen the bonds between the two
countries by royally entertaining and
caring for them with dinners given
by the most prominent men in Eng-
land including the lord mayor of Lon-
don, and magnificient entertainments.
ProfessorScott spoke on the sub-
ject, "Teaching Journalism," at one
session of the conference, dealing
with various phases of the profession.
He also made several speeches during
the conference and on other occasions
including the dinner given by the lord
mayor where he was the spokesman
for the American delegation. ;&
Following the conference, Profes-
sor Scott visited Paris and made a
tour of the battlefields and scenes
prominent in the World War.
One of the outstanding features of
the conference was the appointment
of a committee of five Americans and
five Englishmen to aid and stimulate
interchanging research data and in-
formation from investigation, between
the two countries, with bibliographical
work as the point of main interest.
A report of the conference will be
made by Professor Scott at the Na-
tional conference of teachers of Eng-
lish to be held at Chicago during
Thanksgiving week.
BROOKLYN SCORES
3 TO 0 VICTORY
Superbas Blank Indians in Battle
Between Teams' Star
Hurlers
GRIMES EXHIBITS MARKED
SUPERIORITY OVER BAGBY
(By Associated Press)
New York, Oct. 6 - In a pitching
duel between the leading hurlers of
the National and American league,
Burleigh A. Grimes, Brooklyn's spit-
ball ace, today shut out Cleveland
3 to 0 in the second game of the
world series. His ability to hold the
Indians in check, when hits would
have meant runs, marked his superi-
ority over James 0. Bagby whom
Manager Speaker selected to add a
second game to the Cleveland string.
The victory, which placed Brooklyn
along the side of Speaker's Indians,
was due almost entirely to the excel-
lent hurling of Grimes, who had the
heavy hitting Clevelanders baffled
throughout the game, so far as con-
secutive bingling was concerned. With
the exception of the eighth inning,
when Grimes temporarily lost sight
of the home plate, Cleveland never
appeared in the light of a serious con-
tender.
The inability of the Indians to con-
nect with Grimes' slants, when hits
would have meant runs, is aptly illus-
trated by the fact that the Cleveland
clan got fourteen runners on the bags
of whom ten were stranded and four
retired by subsequent plays.
REGISTRATION FIGURES AT
UNION ONLY 3700 TO DATE
Registration figures at the Union
last night reached 3,700 which is 1,800

below the 5,500 expected by the time
all men have been registered. Upper
classmen and members of the graduate
school including all life members are,
strongly urged to register at once be-
cause officials believe that their delay
in registering is responsible for the
deficiency. The class of '24 has regis-
tered almost to a man.

UNIVERSITY WILL
UPHOLDSTUDENTS'
Committee to Settle Rooming Disputes
to be Appointed
Soon -
BOARD TO HAVE POWER OF
VETOING UNJUST CONTRACTS
Representatives from the landladies
of the city together with representa-
tives from the University are to be ap-
pointed in the near future to settle
all disputes over rooming problems.
Col. Joseph Bursey, who has been in
charge of the work the University has
done this fall to relieve the rooming
situation, said, yesterday that the def-
inite plans for the new arrangement
have not as yet been made but that
he hoped to see the committee func-
tioning within a week.
There will not be more than five
members of the proposed board and
it will adjust all differences between
the students and the landladies. This
board will have the power of nulli-
fying any contract it considers unjust
and it will also protect the students
from any injustice at the hands of
landladies.
The rooming situation is about the
same as yesterday. There is no short-
age, and asking prices are not so
high as earlier in the week.
Hall house, the temporary rooming
quarters provided by the University,
is still being used That not by so many
students as when it was first started.
Indications are that most of the stu-
dents are now located in permanent
rooms.
SENIOR MEN PRESENT
AT THIRD RECEPTION
PRESIDENT URGES WORK TO BE
DONE IN SPIRIT OF THE
ARTIST
Addressing more than 400 men of
the senior class at his third informal
reception held last night in the Union
Assembly hall, President Marion L.
Burton urged each member of this
year's graduating class to do his work
in the spirit of an artist. -
,"An artist," he said, "is a person
who can saturate his work with the
spirit of play."
President Burton shook hands with
all those present before he was form-
ally introduced to them as a body.
His parting words were an invitation
to each one to drop in and call on
him any time either at home or in his
office. The President and Mrs Burton
plan to hold open house on one night
each month for the student body in an
effort to get in personal touch with
the students.
Tonight marks the close of this ser-
les of receptions, when President Bur-
ton will meet the men of the sopho-
more class at 7:30 o'clock in the Un-
ion Assembly hall.
AWAIT FRATERNITY ROBBERY
CLUES FROM DETROIT POLICE
Although no clues have been secur-
ed as yet as to the thieves who ran-
sacked the Psi Omega and Phi Sigma
Kappa fraternity houses Monday night
disposing of a large amount of jewel-
ry and cash, information from pawn
shops in Detroit and vicinity is ex-

pected by local police soon which will
clear up the mystery surrounding the
affair.
In view of the large number of un-
employed men in Detroit at the pres-
ent time, fraternity houses will do
well, in the opinion of the chief of
police, to take extra precautions thisj
year against a series of systematic;
robberies which are almost sure to be
attempted in Ann Arbor.

WILL NOT REPEAT
FRESHMAN TESTS
Contrary to popular belief, fresh-
man efficiency tests conducted last
year were for experiment only, stated
Professor H. H. Higbie Wednesday.
The process will not be repeatedthis
year.
Aside from the fact that the tests
were highly expensive, the idea has not
had sufficient time to prove its prac-
ticability. Close observation of rec-
ords made by all men taking examin-
ations up to a period of five years
after graduation will be kept. The
object of the experiment is to deter-
mine whether or not a keen mind and
ability to grasp small details is not
more important than a mechanical
knowledge of the subject.
At Columbiauniversity where the
test was originated, it has been given
for several years. There it was found
that most of the men making the
campus honor societies had highest
standing in the general efficiency ex-
amination. Nevertheless its real val-
ue is not yet certain.
U. O e MAYSOON
HAVE DEAN OF MEN

BAR "TELME, YOST
TELL. ALUMNI OF
GRID SITUATO
DETROIT GRADUATES HOLD FIRI
OF SChEDULED WEEKLY
MEETINGS
WILL PARADE TO CASE
GAME NEXT SATURDA
Mentor Reviews Training :Season
Date; Says Line Work Part
of Team

Nearly All Old M a Back;
Now Being Held
Regularly

PracticeI

With most 'of the old men back and
a ntimb.er of new try-out4, .ho Varsity
band, under Captain Wilfred Wilson,
director, William C. Elet, "1M, presi
dent, and Eugene A. Osiis, '21M, drkmn
major, is planning on rnakin; this one
of the most successful years since itts
organhvation.
Approximately 65 men have been
practicing regularly and are in readi-
ness to play at the first game of the'
season next Saturday. In addition to
playing at all the football games the
baud will play at President Marion L.
Burton's inauguration and a Band
Bounce will be held some time in No-
vember.
If the men are given sufficient sup-
port they will make the trip to Min-,
nesota, otherwise it may only be pos-
sible to go to Ohio State.
REPORT GENERAL STRIKE
THROUGHOUT ALL PORTUGAL
London, Oct. 6-The Madrid corre-
spondent of Reuter's Limited says that
intelligence from various points on
the frontier indicate that a general
strike apparently of a revolutionary
character has broken out in the whole
of Portugal.
TRYOUTS FOR FOOTBALL
MANAGER REPORT TODAY
All sophomores wishing to try-
out for the position of football
manager report to R. B. Mc-
Kean, '21, football manager, at
I the Ferry field clubhouse, Thurs-
day afternoon at 4 o'clock. Those
who have already reported are
requested to be present at the I
same time.

Plan First Proposed Two Years Ago;
Regents Approve i.t Recent
Meeting
SEVERAL UNIVERSITIES IN
ID-WEST NOW USE SYSTE31
That the University of Michigan at'
some time in the near future may have
a dean of men, similar to several oth-
er of the universities and colleges in
the mid-west, is shown by the recent
approval of the plan by the Board of
Regents. The plan was proposed at
the opening of school two years ago
and since that time has been discussed
by the various executive committees,
ending with an endorsement from the
Regents, although no legislative ac-
tion has been taken.
The idea of a dean of men originated'
in the University of Illinois several
years ago and since that time has been
adopted by Wisconsin, Iowa, and Min-
nesota.
The fundamental duty of a dean of
men is establishing a meeting ground
between the students and the execu-
tive deans, and having a more person,
al acquaintance with the students'
needs than the executives can acquire.
Under the present system at the Uni-
versity the meeting ground between
the men and the executives is best re-
cognized in the Committee on Student
Affairs, but this committee gets in
touch with the student only as he is
connected with some organization on
the campus, such as the Glee club or
the publications.
Under the system as developed at a
few of the other universities the dean
of men has supervision of attendance
and grades, and without interfering
with the discipline which is vested in
the deans of the various departments,
touch with the student only as he is
dent's work so that he can get the
best things in the class room and in
the activities of the school.

(By B. P. Campbell)
Detroit, Oct. 6-Before an assei
blage of 300 Michigan alumni, Phil]
G. Bartelme, director of athletics; a:
Coach Fielding H. Yost today ga
their versions of the football situati
at Michigan this fall. The occasi
was the first of the weekly Michig
alumni luncheons to be held in t
Palm room of the Hotel Cadillac,
Large Orders Place
Mr. Bartelme spoke on "The .Bu
ness Side of Athletics," pointing o
that while in some institutions this
the sordid side; such is not th ea
at Michigan. He stated that it hada
ready cost $12,000 to maintain t
football team this year, and that t
total amount spent would unoubte
ly run to $15,000. A single ord
placed early in the season called.. f
such items as 300 football pants, 3
jerseys, 404 pairs of shoes, 350 pa:
of stockings, 120 headgears, 130 sho
der pads, and other items in a li
proportion. All this equipment is ne
and in addition to that left from li
year. The present cst of equipl
the team is $44.20 per man, Mr. B
tehme stated, and whereas freshm
used to bring part or most of th
equipment with them they now co
expecting the athletic department
outfit them comletely.
Detroters Big Aid
"The movement to interest athlei
in Michigan, which began, and fou
its strongest backing in the Detr
alumni association has done a gr
work," said the speaker. "It has be
the means of substantially aidi
Michigan athletics. The bet of I
entire thing is that it has all' be
open and above board. The meth
used have been fair and square, a
the entire affair is open to public
spection."
Coach Yost reviewed the traini
season to date, pointing out I
weaknesses of the team as it n
stands. He paid special attention
the line, that department in whi
last year's team was cardinally we
In the backfield the coach stated t
he considered the .team espeqi
strong. "We have more good ba<
field men than we have had in a
one year," he said. "Not, perha
the stars we have sometimes had, 1
more really good men than we h
ever before had at one time."
Parade to Case Game
James Schermerhorn, '18. who
In charge of the arrangements
the automobile parade to the C
game, outlined his plans. The alu
ni will leave from Bagley Ave-.'a
Grand River in Detroit, and will
-escorted to the city limits by mot
cycle policemen. There they will
met by Sheriff Coffin who will p
the cars to the Washtenaw cou
line where Sheriff Pack will m
them and make the pace to Fe
field. Schermerhorn appealed to
ery Michigan man in Detroit to
a member of the parade, saying,"
must forget last year and begin t
year. Be behind the team."
Quote Sugar at 11 3-4 Cents in Boas
Boston, Oct. 6-The Revere refin
today announced a price of 11
cents a pound for refined sugar. T
weeks ago the company quoted a n
inal price of 22 1-2 cents a poi
stating it was "under the market.

DIRECTORY CHANGES
MUST BE IN OCT. 9
All corrections, changes-in ad-
dress and telephone numbers
must be in at the office of the.
Students' Directory by Oct. 9.
Names of people in fraterni-
ties, sororities, dormitories and
house clubs, together with the
telephone numbers and address-
es of these organizations, offic-
ers of sectional clubs, honorary
societies, etc., with their tele-
phone numbers must also be in
at the Directory office by Oct. 9.
I Make phone calls to the Stu-
dents' Directory, 176-J.

i

4
I

Important Notice

Students must exchange athletic coupon for athletic book before 12 noon
Saturday, October 9th, 1920. Otherwise they will have to pay admission
of 50 cents to Case game.
Books can be secured at Waterman Gymnasium, Main Hall and Athletic
Association Offices.

Ushers Wanted for Illinois and Chicago Games
The Athletic Association will pay a fee of $i.oo for each game to Univer-
sity Students, providing they are able to report at Ferry Field at 4:00 P. M.
Friday, the day previous to the game, and at 12:oo Noon on the day of
the game.
Applicants for ushering appointments call immediately at the Athletic
Offices, Ann Arbor Press Building, to leave Coupons No. 3 and No. 5 with
name, class and address on reverse side of each coupon.

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