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November 10, 1920 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-10

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IR Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10,

1 r Sirlpgan Dail~
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
Bless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, )6o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily oflice.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
ressed in the communications.
p "hat's Going On" notices will not be' received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITO1IAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR...........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editor......... .............Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
T. H. Adams-H. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor-..-- .......".. .... ....J. A. Bernstein
Editorials............ Lee Woodruff; Robert Sage, T. J. Whinery
Assistant News ................................. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sports............... Robert Angell
Women's Editor....Mary ).La-me
'Telegraph .......................... .. ..... West Gallogly
Telescope ............................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Frances Oberholtzer 1,. Armstrong Kern
Paul G. Weber Robert E. Adams Hlughston McBain
Almena Barlow Norman C. Damon Frank H. McPike
Elizabeth Vickery Byron Darnton Gerald P. Overton
G. E. Clark Thomas E. Dewey Edward Lambrecht
George Reindel Wallace F. Elliott William H. Riley Jr.
Dorothy Monfort Leo J. Hershdorfer Sara Waller

Harry B. Grundy

......

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER .........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising .................................... .. 'P.Joyce
Classifieds......................................Robt. 0. Kerr
Publication ........... .. . ..............--. M. eath
Accounts .... ... .................... ...BRI. Priehs
Circulation....................................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecht P. 1. Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross R: C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Fester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
T. J. HamelJr. D. S. Watterworth

. w..d_, siauaca ..

Night editors for this week are: Hugh Hitch-
cock, Monday night; T. .W. Sargent, Jr., Tuesday
night; B. P. Campbell, Wednesday night; Thomas
Adams, Thursday night; B. P. Campbell, Friday
night; John McManis, Saturday night.
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that nghlt.
WEDNESDAY,. NOVEMBER 10, 1920.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
The Women's league of the University of Mich-
igan was organized in' 1890. It was started at the
instigation of ex-President Angell as a Fruit and
Flower mission; the members visited local hospi-
tals and cheered the patients with such gifts. In
1890 it was decided the organization should be en-
larged and called the Women's league. Ethel
Fountain Hussey was the first president.
FILL THE RANKS TOMORROW
Tomorrow afternoon has been declared a holi-
day by both the Regents of the University and the
mayor of Ann Arbor in order that there may be a
fitting celebration of the victorious close of the.
Great War two years ago as well as a genuine trib-
ute to the dead who made triumph possible.
Armistice day is the anniversary of a twenty-four
hour period of excitement and happiness such as
probably none of us will ever witness again, as the
result of the glorious completion of a terrible ca-
tastrophe. November i ris decisive in history; it
is a world holiday in that twenty-six nations can
rejoice together on that day. It is unbelievable
that anyone who realizes the import and signifi-
cance of Armistice day will hold back through
either neglect or sheer indifference from doing all
in his power to make the celebration of thatday an
unparalleled success.
Do your bit, ex-service men, by slapping on those
old army and navy togs in time to, step into line
tomorrow. Michigan expects to see every one of
her soldiers and sailors back in the ranks.
NO ROOM FOR THESE
Ticket scalpers and professional gamblers who
attempt to make Ann Arbor their headquarters for
the Chicago game should be forced to retire in utter
rout before the united front of University and city
authorities and the opinon of the student body.
There is no room for this class of individuals in a
college town on the occasion of a clean, hard-
fought college football game in which the partici-
pants are amateurs. In the eyes of honest men
there is no place for them anywhere.
When Michigan plays Saturday the entire Uni-
versity will be on trial, in a sense, before the-thou-
sands of alumni who will return for the game. The
presence of the professional gambling and ticket
scalping will cause every loyal Michigan alumnus
to wonder at the negligence of the forces of or-
der, charged to avert and punish such lawbreaking.
Arrest and conviction of a person caught in the
act of scalping at the Illinois game showed the tem.-
per of the authorities. In carrying out the same
policy of enforcement this week-end, the police may
be sure they have the backing of a student body
which knows the harmfulness of such practices.
Any student caught in the act of profiteering on his
ticket is as guilty as the professional, with the added

taint of disloyalty; and the Athletic association will
not err in enforcing its rule.
The professional who makes his headquarters in
a public place and produces a "roll" for the pur-
pose of persuading students to bet on the game is
just as eligible for the hand of the law as his col-
league the pasteboard profiteer. Extension of po-
lice action to cover this class of miscreants should
be backed by the full assistance of student body and
townspeople alike. Ann Arbor can put its foot
down ou both practices this week-end so hard that
scalper and gambler alike will understand they are
persona non grata in this city for all time.
THE BUSINESS ADVENTURER
That the English and- othcr Europeans are not
the only ones "shouldering the white man's bur-
den" is brought out with emphasis each year by the
positions in the export service of American corpo-
rations offered college students. American firms are
taking an increasing interest in opportunities
abroad. Whereas at one time our business men
were willing to let the other peoples of the world
transact our business in the four corners of the
earth, they are now displacing this passive policy
by that of sending their own countrymen to repre-
sent them.
They realize that while the United States itself
is their great natural market and will probably al-
ways be so, there are possibilities in foreign fields
worthy of recognition. Consequently the British,
French, and Germans who have been middle men
for the world so long are being forced to make
room for American colleagues.
Banking, marketing, or exporting in a foreign
land all have their appeal for men with a love for
adventure. Occasionally the one who enters these
fields finds himself called unon to display that cour-
age so frequertly described in Kipling's poems
which carries a man to success in spite of isolation
from white men, secret antagonism of natives, or
the hardships of a tropical wilderness. He may be
forced to show his stamina by holding out a year or
longer as the only white man in a far-away village,
dealing with people whose ways are strange and
facing unknown dangers, but he will be rewarded
at least by the satisfaction of taking part in a man-
sized strutlgle, and by a life full of new scenes and
excitement.
Not every nan has that pioneer instinct which
makes him delight in extending the outposts of civ-
ilization. To most of us, hazards, hardships, loss
of the companionship of people of the same race,
far outweigh the zest of commercial empire build-
ing. But those who love the game for itself will
find that there still can be had in business the color
and romance of former centuries whose absence we
are wont to lament.
Every ex-soldier or sailor on the. faculty list is
expected by the ex-service students of the Univer-
sity to march by their side in the great Armistice
day parade. Age made no difference in. loyalty to
colors then, and it is going to make no difference
Thursday, when young and old alike pay tribute
to our hero dead.
The Telescope
The weather man predicts us rain,
We'll get a cold, cold drizzle,
And now I wish that I'd been bad -
I'd keep so warm and sizzle.
MAN SHOT THRU DOOR - Detroit News
head.
And after that he probably shut up.
First stude-I see where a scientist has discov-
ered something that will cure a man's cravig for
whiskey.
Second ditto-That's nothing. In lab last year
I discovered something that will do that too.
First-You did? What was it you discovered?

Second-Some straight alcohol.
Dear Noah:
I have a son in college who in his efforts to be
exact has a great habit of "splitting hairs." What
shall I do with him? Father.
Why not hire him out to one of the local short
order houses where his services would be in great
demand as meat cutter for the sandwiches?
Familiar History, Poetically Told
'Tis said that in the days of old
When Nineveh was Tyred,
To see a flame was her delight,
And that's why Rome was fired .
When through the dank dark streets at night
Cruel Cassius did Rome,
The next day Caesar was a sight,
As is this little pome.
If brevity is the the soul of wit then some of
these dresses that we see every day on the campus
are the funniest things that ever happened.
Famous Closing Lines
"An important article gone to press," he mut-
tered as his friend took his only pair of trousers to
the tailor. NOAH COUNT.
Some of the worser half tried to join merrily in
the "Hello day" festivities, and were very properly
frozen.

DETROIT UNITED L"ES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920'
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limuiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presse: at 9:48 a. in. and e'.ary two
hours to 9:48 p. in.
Local; to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25.a.in., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.
LOCAL PHOTOGRAPHER GIVES
PORTRAIT BOOK TO LIBRARY
"Portraits of Leading Educators" is
the name which has been given to a
leatherbound, loose-leaf book to be
presented to the University by H. L.
Spedding, a local photographer. It
will be placed in the general library.
During the educational conference
here last week, photographs were
taken of many of the most prominent
men, and these pictures will be the
first to be placed in the book. The
sittings were taken at the Union. The
photographs will be sent to the edu-
cators for their approval and will be
returned by them autographed. The
collection of pictures will bei added to
from time to time, as Mr. Spedding
says he expects to get a photograph of
every prominent educator who visits
Ann Arbor. The book will be about
12 by 16 inches in size and the 'pic-
tures 10 by 15 inches, some in the
one-half style, others in the three-
quarters lengths.
ELECTRICITY CONSERVATION
URGED AS PLANT IS TAXED
The buildings and grounds depart-
anent wishes again to urge conserva-
tion and economy in the use of elec-
tricity. The present capacity for gen-
eration has been taxed to the limit,
and thishcondition will continue to
exist until the installation of the new
600 kilowatt unit.
Fwieral Services for Condon Today
Funeral services for Michael Con-
don, oldest Michigan employee, who
diol Sunday afternoon, will be hBd
a 9 o'clock this morning at St.
Thomas' church,
Patronize Daily advertisers.-AdR
'T s f-

I

i

NOVEMBER
S X T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6
7, 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30
AfeI: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hant Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

,

for information concerning
A LARGE
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TR U N K
FRATERNITY
HOUSE PORTERS
NOTICE!
This Trunk may be Stored
away somewhere in your house
TELEPHONE 1300

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OUR SODAS
AND SUNDAES
ARE THEY GOOD I
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United States Marine Band
"The Presidents own Wand'

SAT. 8 P.M

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Extra Concert Series

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Tickets $1.00-75c-50c at School of Music

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