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November 10, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-10

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY RAIN OR SNOW
TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
PAY AND NIGHT llR
SERVICE

TTl1S 'V VSTT 7 T.. 9Q _ __ _

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VOL#. XXXI.No. 32.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 10. 1920

FORMER- SHIPPING
BOARD EMPLOYEES
SUBMIT CHARGE~

ALLEGE MANY SHADY
IN EMERGENCY
FLEET

DEAL

SAY WORTHLESS BONDS
TAKEN AS SECURITIE
State Gross Waste of Governmen
Funds; Improperly Drawn
Contracts, in List
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 9. - Election o
several officials of the shipping board
emergency fleet corporation, granting
the purchasing of supplies for repair-
ing old merchant ships, owned by the
government; the use of political or
other influences in floating contracts
for ship construction, are among the
maze of charges made in reports sub-
mitted to the house committee on
shipping board operations today, by
A. M. Fisher and J. F. Richardson,
former employes of the board.
Refuses Discussion
Chairman 'Benson of the shipping
board refused to discuss a report, re-
quiring that any statement he might
have to make would be made to the
house committee which is continuing
its investigation of the board's ope-
rations.
Thenreport was made public to-
night by the committee of which Rep-
resentative Walsh, Republican of
Massachusetts, is chairman.
Taking up in detail the board's ac-
tivities, the report charged: gross
waste of government funds, improp-
erly drawn contracts which cost the
government large sums, and failure
of the various divisions of the board
to co-operate efficiently, and the al-
most complete failure of some of the
divisions to function properly.
Padding of Payrolls
Padding the payrolls by firms re-
pairing shipping board vessels; own-
ership by companies operating gov-
ernment owned vessels of stock
companies furnishing suppliessto
those craft at prices ranging any-
where from 40 to 50 per cent above
wholesale costs; wholesale theft of
supplies and equipment of ships; and
the loss of millions of dollars through
improperly secured loans made to
contractors building vessels, also was
charged.
NALL OF FAME ADMITS
NOTED MICHIGAN LUMNA1
ALICE FREEMAN PALMER AMONG
SEVEN CHOSEN FOR
HIGH HONORS
Alice Freeman Palmer, '76, one of
the first women to graduate from the
University, has been admitted to the
New York University Hall of Fame.
According to the announcement
made Saturday she was accorded her
place as a great teacher, along with
six men: James Buchanan Eads, en-
gineer, Patrick Henry, statesman and
patriot, William Thomas Green, phys-
ician, August Saint-Gaudens, sculp-
tor, Roger Williams, preacher and
founder of the state of Rhode Island,
and Mark Twain, humorist.
Mrs. Palmer was the first woman
to have a part in the graduation pro-
gram of this University. She served
as president of Wellesley college for
five years, and as non-resident dean
of the women's department of the
University of Chicago for three years.
Her death occurred Dec. 6, 1902, in
Paris.
RIGGS TO SPEAK AT JUNIOR
ENGINEER SMOKER THURSDAY

Prof. Henry E. Riggs, of the civil

EFFINGER LEAVES
FOR INAUGURATION
Dean John R. Effinger, representin
the University of Michigan, left toda
for Meadville, Pa., to attend the in
auguration of Dr. Fred Whitlo Hix
son, as president of Allegheny col
lege.
The inauguration exercises taki
place the afternoon of Thursday, Nov
11. At noon a luncheon is to be given
university and college representatives
with the academic procession at 2
o'clock and the ceremonies at 2:30
o'clock.
The representatives will be ban
queted at 6 o'clock and a formal re-
ception given in their honor at 9
o'clock of the same evening, closing
the inauguration.
SMORRSON TO BE
SUNDAYSPEAKER
Lauded As One of Most Brilliant
Talkers of Present Day
America
DONALD J. PORTER, '21, TO
BE CHAIRMAN OF SERVICE
Dr. Charles C. Morrison, preacher
and editor of The Christian Century,
will speak next Sunday night in Hill
auditorium in the second of the
monthly Union services for this year.
The subject on which he will speak
has not yet been announced.
Donald J. Porter, '21, will 'act as
chairman of this service, while the
prayer and scripture reading will be
given by a speaker from out of the
ctiy. Music is in charge of William
Wheeler, head of the vocal department
of the School of Music, and detailed
plans of the program will be complet-
ed later in the week.
Thomas S. Evans, general secretary
of the Students' Christian association,
says of the speaker, "Dr. Morrison is
one of the most brilliant speakers in
America today. His speaking ability
is equalled only by his scholarly
thinking and his editorship of The
Christian Century, the best and most
progressive religious publication in
the country.
"This paper has the finest religious
articles of the day and of all the pub-
lications of its kind that come to Lane
hall, it is the best. Dr. Morrison is
highly progressive in the editing of
his paper. I am sure his talk will be
highly interesting to students and of
great instructive value."
He is the author of several books o
a religious character, probably the
best known of which is "The Daily
Altar." Sunday morning Dr. Morri-
son will speak at the Congregational
church here.
.Barrisers Hold
Fall Initiation'
With impressive and arduous cere-
monies, Barristers, senior honorary
law society, initiated 13 men at 3
o'clock yesterday afternoon in the
practice court room of the Law build-
ing. The neophytes were Ernest Zeig-
ler, Harry Rudine, B. B. Loring, G. D.
Clapperton, Lee Joslyn, Jr., George
Bouchard, Turner Rudesill, M. B.
Conklin, G. B. Wolfe, E. J. Richards,
W. R. Tomkin, A. J. Cohn, and Prof.
E. R. Sunderland. Willis Blakeslee,
'21L, was in charge of the initiation,

assisted by Arthur Zeigler, '21L.
After the initiation the men went to
the Union where a banquet was given
in honor of the new members.
Eclipse Of Sun
Evident Today'
One-fourth of the surface of the
sun will be obscured in a partial
eclipse between 7:54 and 9:56 o'clock
this morning, which will reach its
greatest magnitude at 8:52 o'clock.
The eclipse occurs when the earth

At Meeting
Eliected

Tonight Captain Will Be
and Idea of Contests
Explained

' SOPHOMORE CLASS TO ELECT
S LEADER THURSDAY NIGHT
Freshmen tonight will inaugurate
the preliminaries for the annual Fall
-games which are to be held Saturday
morning at Ferry field.
The doors of Hill auditorium will be
opened at 7 o'clock tonight and at 7:15
the freshmen will be addressed by up-
perclassmen who will explain the
games to them. A freshman captain
will be elected and he will appoint his
lieutenants.
Calvin G. Wetzel, '21E, chairman of
the Student council Fall games com-
mittee, will preside at the freshman
meeting, and he will be assisted by
other councilmen in telling the men
of '24 how to do their part.
Members of the sophomore class
will meet at- 7:15 Thursday night in
University hall to elect their captain
for the games. He will appoint lieu-
tenants to assist him.
"It is imperative;" said Wetzel last
night, "that every freshman be on
hand for the meeting tonight at 7:15
o'clock sharp, in order that arrange-
ments for the games may be made
promptly, and that the freshmen may
get a correct idea of Saturday's ac-
tivities."
0BBIRS BLAMEDFOR
CONTAGIOUS DISEASES
UNSANITARY CONDITIONS CAUSE
OF CASES SAYS HEALTH
SERVICE
That lack of sanitation in local bar-
ber shops is the cause of the increas-
ing number of cases of contagious
skin diseases which have been
brought to their attention, is a state-
ment made by authorities of the Uni-
versity Health service.
Dirty Towels Used
The disease, which is more com-
monly known as "barber's itch," is
due to the use of dirty towels by bar-
bers. While not extremely danger-
ous, says the Health service, it is
highly irritable and painful, and
should be carefully guarded against.
Several physicians of the Health
service, in order to ascertain forj
themselves sanitary conditions in I
barber shops, made personal visits
of inspection to all Ann Arbor shops,
and finally decided that barbers were
using dirty-towels on the faces of
their patrons. In order to abolish this
danger, the doctors declare that stu-
dents should insist on clean towels,
and wherever other than clean ones
are dsrr chrnld hinf '+f +

FRESH TO PREPARE
SFOR FALL GAMES'

Practically every member of the
faculty who was in the service during
the war, will appear in uniform to-
morrow afternoon to take part in the
Armistice day parade, according to a
statement made yesterday by the com-
mittee in charge of the Armistice day
celebration.
Plans for the parade have been en-
tirely completed by the committee and
it is expected that almost every man
in the University who saw service will
turn out. The various University units
will take formation promptly at 1:15
o'clock and the parade is scheduled to
start at 1:30 o'clock sharp. r
Led by the University band, the de-
tachments will march west on North
University to State street and then

URGED BY JOHNSON
President of American League Asks
Minors to Refrain from
Taking Sides
DECLARES NEW CLUBS WILL
REPLACE THOSE DESERTING
(By Associated Press)
Kansas City, Nov. 9. - The minor
baseball leagues of the country at a
convention here today were urged by
President Ban Johnson, of the Amer-
ican league, to follow "a hands off
policy" in the baseball war and to
take no action that would be partisan
to either side.
President Johnson, here for the an-
nounced purpose of preventing the
minors from joining with the new Na-
tional league in the Lasker plan of
reorganization, addressed the conven-
tion this afternoon. Proponents of
the new league said the Lasker plan
will appear later.
The political shakeup in the na-
tional association of minor leagues
which it was rumored was being en-
gineered by the faction, said to be
favorable toPresidenttJohnson in the
baseball war, failed -to materialize.
John H. Farrell was re-elected secre-
tary for 10 years, and Mike Sexton
of Rock Island was re-elected presi-
dent.
Previous to his address before the
convention, President Johnson issued
a statement declaring "that it was
war to the finish and after that the
American league would place new
clubs in New York, Chicago and Bos-
ton to replace those joining the new
national league."
Chimes To Ile On
S a le Saturday,

EX-Si RVICE MEMBERS OF FACULTY WILL
BE IN ARMISTICE DAY PROCESSION

proceed to the City hall square where
they will join the Ann Arbor divisions.
After marching down Main street to
Packard, the columns will turn up
State, march past the Union, and pro-
ceed to Hill audtiorium where the
memorial services are to be held.
Col. Arthur H. Lovell, of the engin-
eering college, will act as grand ma-
shal of the day. He will be assisted
by several aides, chosen from among
the prominent ex-service men on the
campus and in the city of Ann Arbor.
The Rev. Charles W. Merriam, past-
or of the Park Congregational church
of Grand Rapids, will be the principal
speaker at the memorial services to be
held at 3 o'clock in Hill auditorium
following the parade.
The complete program for the mem-
orial services is under the direction
of George A. Bowen, formerly the
community song leader for the city of
Flint. The services, which will last
only one hour, will commence with1
the singing of "The Star Spangled
Bannsr," after which the Rev. L. A.
Barrett, of the Presbyterian church,
will offer the invocation. After the
invocation Mr. Bowen will lead the1
audience in some of the war-time1
camp songs, the words of which wills
appear on the program. Following a
solo, to be rendered by a member off
the School of Music, the speaker of
the day will be introduced by a mem-
ber of the faculty. An anthem and the1
benediction will mark the end of the
service.I
Invitations to the service have beenf
sent by the committee to the deansE
of the various colleges in the Uni-Y
versity, and places on the platform
will be reserved for them. Because of
the large number of men taking part
in the parade, it is probable that the
entire main floor and first balcony of
Hill auditorium will be taken up by
the different detachments. However,
it is the desire of the committee that
all students and faculty members to-
gether wtih as many townspeople as
possible, attend the services.
Following the exercises the mem-
bers of the University post of the Vet
erans of Foreign Wars will have a
group picture taken on the steps of
the Union for the 1921 Michiganen-
sian.
Carver, La Forge
Win Appreciation
From Audiencet
(By D. F. M.)9
Warm appreciation greeted Charles:
Carver, basso, and Prank La Forge,
pianist, at the second concert of the
Matinee Musicale series given Tues-
day night in Pattengil auditorium.
Coupled with a true bass voice ofs
wide range, a wealth of color in thee
lower no less than in the higher tones,t
easy enunciation, and dramatic qualityo
of interpretation, Mr. Carver possess-t
es an engaging personality which in-
sured him the sympathy of the entiref
audience.
"0 Thou My Sacred Land," by HugoS
Wolf, was especially adapte4 to thet
young singer's full rich tones. Bish-
op's "Love Has Eyes," won him a well
earned encore as did also Grieg's rol-
licking boat song, "Thy Warning Is
Good." Mr. Carver concluded the pro-
gram with four French songs and
three by La Forge including "A Hearts
Mislaid," which had to be repeated.t
Beside reaching the acme of excell-
ent accompanying, Frank La Forgeg
played two piano solos, proving agains
in "Romance" that an artist's inter- g
pretation of his own work is always
doubly enjoyable and instructive,e

while in "Etude de Concert," by Mac-t
Dowell, Mr. La Forge left nothing un-
done in the way of perfect technique.t

PRICE FIVE CENTS
PEP MEETING To
PRIME MICHIGA4N
FOR COME-BACK
SPIRITUAL REJUVENATION FOR
CHICAGO STRUGGLE
PLANNED
FRIDAY NIGHT DATE
OF BIG STUDENT RALLY
Doors of 1ill Auditorium to Open at
7 o'clock; Only Two Speeehes
on Program
In the face of two conference de-
feats on the football field this sea-
son, Michigan this week is preparing
a comeback, spiritually as well as
physically.
The third mass meeting of the year
is to be held this week, it has been
announced, for the purpose of show-
ing the Michigan Varsity football
team that despite the two recent de-
feats the University is behind it to a
man.
Friday night has been set as the
time, Roswell P. Dillon, '21E, student
councilman in charge, announced last
night. The doors of Hill auditorium
will open at 7 o'clock, and the meet-
ing itself will begin at 7:30. Only
two speakers will be on the program
for the evening, Dillon has announc-
ed, in order that no more time than
necessary will be consumed.
The band and varsity cheer leader
will be in attendance, and the cus-
(Continued on page Eight)
i-
SUPERFICIALITY VICE
Of AMERICIA-BURTON

PRESIDENT
ING

ADDRESSES MEET.
OF GRADUATE
CLUB

tenutn eheu had branitr to theat With the announcement that the No-
tention of the head barber or to the vember issue of Chimes, campus lit-
Health service. erary publication, will be on sale Sat-
Campaign Being Waged urday morning, C. M. Atkinson, '22
A campaign against unsanitary business manager, also states that
methods in barber shops is being car- only 1,100 subscriptions have been re-1
ried on by the Health service, and it ceived to date. The aim of the busi-
has adopted as its slogan, "Insist oi. ness department, he declares, is to!
clean towels." While the disease " vsecure a total of 2,000 subscriptions.
not as yet very prevalent on the cam-i Saturday will be the last opportun-
pus, it has been rapidly spreading ity to sign up for Chimes, and Atkin-
among school children, whose cases son suggests that students call at the
are being handled by town physi- Chimes office in the Press building any
cians. time before 5 o'clock during the rest,
of this week. This also applies to
ACOLYTES ELECT those who have already signed sub-
scription slips, but who have not yet;
OFFICERS MONDAY paid the full amount.
Meeting next Monday night for the MORE SUBSCRIBERS
first time this semester, the Acolytes
will elect new officers. "Ethical ap- TO 'ENSIAN NEEDED
proach to a solution of present day
educational problems," will be sub- Subscriptions for the Michiganen-
ject for the semetser and different sian have now reached a total of 2,150,
papers will be read on it. several hundred below the early esti-
For the first time in the history of mate of 3,000 copies. However, ac-
the society, women are invited to at- cording to Boyd Logan, '21, business
tend the meetings, although they will manager, the signing up of three or
not be elected to membership. four hundred more subscribers will
The program for the semester is as insure a successful publication.
follows: Nov. 15, Prof. Walter B. Students who have not yet subscrib-
Pillsbury on "Relation Between Ideal ed may do so any afternoon this week
and Action"; Nov. 29, Prof. Robert from 2 to 5 o'clock at the 'Ensian's
M. Wenley on "Final Purpose of Edu-! office on the second floor of the Press
cation"; Dec. 6, Prof. Guy M. Whip- building.
ple on "Human Nature and Its Remak-
ing in Human Education"; Dec. 20, CORRECTION
Symposium - "The Undergraduate The Graduate club will not meet in
Soul," by student members; and Jan. the Union this evening as was stated
10, Prof. Charles H. Cooley on "Pres- in yesterday's Daily. The meeting
ent Day Social Ideas and Education." was held last night.

Declaring superficiality to be the
national vice of America, President
M. L. Burton told members of the
Graduate club, meeting last night in
the assembly hall of the Union, that
it is their outstanding duty to raise
the standards of scholarship in the
United States by concentrated, thor-
ough-going mental work. "It is a
question not of how much we are do-
ing but of how well we are doing It,"
he said.
Hurry Shows
The characteristic hurry of the
American people has weighed into the
standards of our civilization, showing
itself in every phase of our lives, and
especially in their scholarship, oen-
tinued President Burton. He pointed
out that Rhodes scholarship men, dis-
tinctly above the average American
student, are in the words of their Ox-
ford tutors "lacking in accuracy and
deficient in scholarship in a wide
sense." Although appreciated for
their distinctive American qualities,
'they seem to have been taught noth-
ing very precisely.'.
Indictment Found
Finding in these statements a se-
vere indictment of our standards of
scholarship, the speaker asserted that
there must be an improvement in
these standards during the present
generation. Such improvement, he
said, must first manifest itself In the
graduate schools.
President Burton stressed the ne-
cessity for accuracy and concentra-
tion. He urged that research work,
as being absolutely vital to a true
university, be brought to a higher de-
gree of thoroughness.
Preceding the address by Dr. Bur-
ton members of the graduate school
elected officers for the coming year.
M. ten Hoor was chosen president, J.
K. Pollock, vice-president, Roberta
Deam, secretary, and E. 0. Scott,
treasurer. Executive committee mem-
bers will be named later.

i
i

engineering department, will be comes into the shadow cast by the
egeing partmentew'll e moon as it lies between the sun and
among the speakers at the '22 engin-the earth. From the spot on the earth
eers' smoker to be held at 7:30 o'clock lying directly in this shadow a total1
Thursday night at the Union. Roger's eclipse can be seen, but as Ann Ar-!
orchestra and the Mimes quartet will bor is some distance away, only a
furnish music, while Vernon Foster, partial one will be evident. The
Spotlight artist, will perform. Apples eclipse takes place during new moon
doughnuts, cider, and smokes will be time when the moon's orbit lies in the
furnished for refreshments.:same plane as the orbit of the earth.

Druids Take In
Six New Members
Druids, senior honorary literary so-
ciety, initiated six men at 4 o'clock
yesterday afternoon. The new wor-
shippers of the mistletoe are William
H. Ingham, George M. Gilmore,
Charles H. Murchison, Robert L.
Drake, George Duffield, and Peirce
McLouth. After the ceremonies came
the festivities, which consisted of a
dinner at the Union in honor of the
new initiates, at which Professors
Cross, Tilly, and Dean John R. Effin-
ger spoke.

i

f FRESHMEN MEET TONIGHT
The freshman meeting at 7:15
o'clock tonight will inaugurate
the activities for the annual Fall
' games which are to be held Sat-
urday morning at Ferry field.

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