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November 06, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR; NO CHANGE IN
TEMPERATURE

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 29. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

CLEMENTSLIRARY
WiIL BE BUILT IN
REAR OF U-HALLi

R

REGENTS DECIDE POSITION
HOUSING FOR FAMOUS
COLLECTION

OF

ALBERT KAHN DESIGNS
TWO-STORY STR UCTURE
Work on Building to Be Commenced
in Spring;. Bedford Limestone
Construction
Erection of the building to house
the Clements Library of American
History will be directly in the rear of
University hail where the fire station
now stands, according to a decision
reached by the Board of Regents.
The building, which is to be a two-
story structure, will be of Bedford
limestone similar to that of Alumni
Memorial hll. It will be situated 100
feet from the northwest corner of .the
Library, standing at right angles to
it, and facing east towards the mall.
Start Work in Spring ,
The plans have not yet been com-
pleted but sketches have been made
by the architect, Albert Kahn, who
also designed Hill auditorium and the
Library. Completion of the plans is
expected by Jan. 1 and construction
to be started next spring.-
The structure will be absolutely
fireproof and contain rooms for two
professors of American history in ad
dition to provision for the library and
the library force. The extensive col-
lection of newspapers owned by Re-
gent Clements will be housed in the
basement.
Owing to the fact that the books
are so valuable, they will be kept in
steel cases with plate glass doors.
Books which are especially valuable
will be kept in a vault with the doors
heavily barred. The public will be
allowed to look in at one end through
unbreakable glass.
Vault Construction
The inside of the vault will be fur-
nished much the same as a library
in a home some 20 by 26 feet in di-
mension with table, chairs, and book
cases. The cases will also be of steel
with this new kind of glass which is
said to be strong enough to turn a
bullet.
Both the building and the library
are the gifts of Regent William L
Clements, '82, of Bay City, who pre-'
sented them to the University last
February.
The donation of this valuable col-
lection gave Michigan the best library'
in the West, according to Librarian
W. W. Bishop.
Dent and Medic Returns Delayed
Due to an unavoidable delay in the
collection and counting of votes, re-
sults of the dental and medical class
elections could not be procured lastE
night. Final results will appear in
tomorrow's Daily.
TICKET COMPLAINTS f
A number of complaints have
been received by the Student
council from students who sent
in their yellow coupons for Chi-
cago game tickets before the r
time limit set by the Athletic t
association, and had these cou-
pons returned.
All men who have complaints
to make in this regard should
submit their evidence to Stu-I
dent council members who will
be at the Student council desk
in the student activities room,J
third floor of the Union, between z
1 and 3 o'clock Monday and
Tuesday afternoons.
I I

UNION WILL GIVE
RESULTS OF GAME
Returns from the Michigan-O. S. U.
ame today at Columbus will be given
rom the following places: Play-by-
)lay in the reading room, tap room
Lnd billiard rooms of the Union. A
niniature playing field is located in
he reading room of the Union.
A play-by-play bulletin has been
orected in the Majestic theater, and
luring the game results will be post-
d. A special wire connects the Ar-
,ade theater with the scene of the
;ame and returns will be given out
luring the show.
URGE STUDENTS TO
lOIN PEP SMOKER1
Detroit Alumni Hope for Large Crowd
at Gathering During 0. S. U.
Game
BOARD WILL SHOW PROGRESS
OF CONTEST PLAY BY PLAY
Students unable to attend the Ohio
State game at Columbus today are
3arnestly requested by the Detroit
ilumni to make the shorter trip into
Detroit and join them in their pep
3moker to be held during the game
it the Board of Commerce.
Particular stress has been laid on
his point by the committee in charge
rnd it is to be hoped that a suffi-
.ient number of students will attend
to insure the complete success of the
-an. Besides the recording of the
;ame play by play on a gigantic
oard representing the field, there will
be a jazz band, corncob pipes, dough-
nuts and cider. A cheerleader will be
,n hand to put the necessary punch
in the crowd and create the old time
Spirit.
Among those responsible for the
Smoker and actively engaged in carry-
ug it out are Carl Johnson, '20, Rus-
iel Barnes, '20, and Harry Carey, '20.
Tf the smok.er is a success, a similar
'me will be planned for the Minne-
7ota game.
SENTOR ENGINEERS
PICK COMMITTEES
At the meeting of the Senior engi-
ner assembly last Thursday, the fol-
lowing committees were appointed:
Social: C. Wetzel, chairman, L. E.
Frost, P. Roderick, M. E. McGowen,
E. F. Moore. Finance: R. C. Gind-
ley, chairman, J. Kennedy, W. Blod-
gett, M. Covell, J. Finley. Auditing:
Tex Gaines, chairman, E. Johnson.
Assembly: E. Kerby, chairman, D.
Stratton, W. Meese. Publicity: R.
Smith, chairman, D. Wheeler, H. M-
Naughton, J. D. Hulson, W. H. Grid-
ley. Picture: D. Hunter, chairman,
W. S. Clarkson, D. W. Pitkin. Memo-
rial: R. Dillon, chairman, D. Long-
enecker, G. Hall, L. B. Middleditch.
Souvenir: J. Reilly, chairman, H.
G. Johnson, T. Keidanz, H. A. Browne,
A. R. Reynolds. Reception: R. Mar-
shall, chairman, C. P. Beath, G. R.
Clemens, M. Pearson, 0. S. Gully.
Cap and Gown: J. Pilkington, chair-
man, R. B. Alexander, R. G. Freeman,
K. G. Phelps, E. A. Krueger.
Promenade: S. Steinbaugh, chair-
man, S. Lawson, F. Pfluke, S. N. Law-
son, G. L. Weninger, L. J. Scott.
Sing: S. D. Porter, chairman. Invi-
tation: Ted Gustafson, chairman, P.
Ramsey, W. Lippincott, L. S. Lukins,

W. F. Barney. Banquet: F. Stoner,
chairman, W: Williams, C. Auer, L.
Ferris, J. L. Baker.
The following men were appointed
on a committee of three seniors, two
Juniors, one sophomore, and one fresh-
man, to discuss the wearing of canes
and other like matters: J. Brill, A.

BOUNCE RASES
EG FOR BA9ND TRIP
4500 STUDENTS FILL AUDITOR-
IUM; CHAIRMAN CALLS
BOUNCE SUCCESS
ASSURES SENDING OF 70
PIECES TO OHIO STATE
Rhodes and Wood, McDonald, Tommy
Thomas' Band and Merrie-
lees Feature
Proceeds amounting to more than
$2,000 were realized from the Band
Bounce held last night in Hill audi-
torium. This figure represents more
than the amount necessary to send
the band of 70 pieces to Columbus
today. Nearly 4,500 students were
present.
H. P. Lindsay, '21, in charge of the
Bounce, is more than pleased with
the result, and wishes to thank,
through the medium of The Daily, the
students who helped to make it a suc-
cess. The committee in charge of ad-
vertising consisted of J. M. Stedman,
'21, Hugh Benson, '22E, and Bryan
Warmen, '23.
Band Numbers
The Band program rendered repre-
sented a variety of concert numbers,
each of which drew forth unstinted
applause. The selection from Robin
Hood by de Koven and "Whistling
Jonnies" by Hager especially pleased.
Rhodes and Wood opened the vaude-
ville. section of the program with
Xylophone numbers, which were well
received. Both members of the team
proved themselves masters at their
particular instrument.
Archie McDonald. '22L, followed
with a new line of humor, and several
good recitations. His impersonations
of two professors of the Lit school and
of Dr. Thomas Lovell brought down
the house.
Acts Are Successes
Real harmony was furnished by
Tommy Thomas' all professional or-
chestra in the rendering of "Whisper-
ings," and their jazz piece, "Chile
Bean," brought forth much applause.
Knight Merrielees, '20E, brought the
Bounce to a close with the singing of
several of the latest popular songs,
a la Al Jolson.
COMMONER ARRIVS TO
OPEN LECTURE SERIES
BRYAN TO BE GUEST AT DINNER
IN UNION PRECEDING
ADDRESS
William Jennings Bryan will arrive
in Ann Arbor this afternoon to give
the first lecture of the Oratorical as-
sociation program at 8 o'clock tonight
in Hill auditorium. Mr. Bryan will
be the guest of honor at a dinner to
be given at 6 o'clock in the Union,
which will be attended by President
Marion L. Burton, Prof. Thomas C.
Trueblood, and other invited guests.
President Burton will introduce Mr.
Bryan at the lecture. After the ad-
dress, Mr. Bryan will leave for the

east. During his stay here he will
be the guest of Professor Trueblood.
As the address will begin promptly
at 8 o'clock it is necessary that every-
one who wishes to attend the lecture
be in his seat by 7:50 o'clock. No al-
lowance will be made for late com-
ers. Tickets for the lecture may be

Varsity Celebrities Set Columbus
i All Agog On Eve Of Big Contest

(With apologies to Ring Lardner)
Columbus, Nov. the fith.
Dere. Al:
This hear Michigan 11 blew in early
this am from A Harbor mish. I herd
one guy call it An Harbor, but I guess
thats just a little colidge dog, eh al?
But not to interupt m-yself Al this
bunch sure looks like the goods to
me. Most of em, wouldnt have me
picking scraps with em on a dark
night no kid.
Goebel Needs Two Uppers
1 of the bigest they call capting
Gets. I guess cause hes so good at
bringing home the bacon, I laughed at
that one al. But he aint a pach on
this man Goble. They say he had two
uppers in sucseshun on the sleeper.
They - brought a noble or- something
alongtoo. His title is Duke Done, but
he don't look it. A relation, proba-
bly a discount or a Pere, came also
named Jack. These Ohio birds gotta
look out for him, Al, cause he dont
look like the kind to letany ancestry
hold him down"when he gets into a
scrap.
FARNHAM [lAUDs"1R10.
IN GLOWING- TRIBUTE
DECLARES ROOSEVELT'S DEATH
STRUCK PATRIOTISM
BLOW
Charles W. Farnham of St. Paul,
Minn., gave his interpretation of. the
life of Theodore Roosevelt yesterday
afternoon in Hill auditorium. "I
have come to paint an impressionis-
tic picture of my subject," he said,
and then added, "After I am finished,
if you are gladder that he lived and
sadder that he died, my lecture shall
not have been in vain."
Devotee of Roosevelt
Mr. Farnham declared he had fol-
lowed Roosevelt "in war and peace,
in politics and out," and he said that
it would take a course of lectures to
survey the - field covered by the life
of Roosevelt. He-brought- out--Roose-
velt as a president, as vice-president,
as governor of New York, as assist-
ant secretary of the Navy, as police
commissioner in New York city, as a
writer, as a speaker, as a conversa-
tionalist, as a lieutenant-colonel of
rough riders, as an explorer, and a
naturalist.
Finally Won Letter
"Those who fought him while he
lived were quickest to come forward
in their praise after his death," said
Mr. aFrnham. "At his death patriot-
ism has been struck an almost mor-
tal blow. Roosevelt never received
an athletic letter, but It has been
said beforeshe ended his life he got
two letters, T. R. He was the
youngest man to ever hold any of the
offices that he did hold.
Wonderful Conversationalist
"Mr. Roosevelt did not read un-
pleasant books and it was the excep-
tional novel that he read where 'he'
does not marry 'her,'"' quoted Mr.
Farnham. "The letters of Theodore
Roosevelt would in my judgment form
the most interesting, instructive, and
elevating work of its kind ever writ-
ten. In the gift of conversation he
stood absolutely alone. Kipling says
of his conversational ability, 'I lis-
tened and wondered until the world
seemed to be spinning round and The-
odore Roosevelt was the spinner."'"
Leading Lawyer
Such are a few of the many state-

ments concerning Roosevelt made by
Mr. Farnham. Mr. Farnham is a
member of the executive council of the
American Bar association. President
Burton, in introducing Mr. Farnham,
spoke of him as a lawyer by profession
and interested in Roosevelt by choice,
interest, and acquaintance.

One of the hedliners Js this Stek.
Walter Camp made him full on his
mithical 11 two years back. Bronxes,
it was I think. They brought an
usher with them too but i guess he
wont wait to see any tickit stubbs to
sit these State boys down. His other
pal beside jack Done is another jack
named Perrin. He works behind the
line too-until the center passes the
ovul. Then they say he gets across
it like a welsh rabbit. Any guy whot
can eache tranes the way he don out
of Toledo wont gather no moss.
I read somewhere that this full Nel-
son has the greatest defensif back on
the teme. He probly used sloans
lineament eh Al? The left finis plays
with his hat on or something I guess,
I didnt get his right name, but he
looks like he had a good 20 minits
boil. Vik, the central, is another man
what wouldnt sop any milk.
Gob Not Like Pater
Pres wilsons boy what goes out of
offus next March four is playing a
guard. Guess he didnt inherit the
piece treete making instinkt from
the ole man cause he looks like one
fighter. Next beyond him on the line
is a boy whose forgot his last name
called Johns.
I overheard a couple of the boys
talking and I guess it needed all yost
and his assistance to get the footbawl
men out of their downies this morn.
But now their up I just figure that its
going to be one awful job to put them
down again. Well, al, time is tied by
no man so we'll see tomorow.
Yrs.
BILL.
Wyvern Elects 11
Junior Women
Invitations to membership in Wy-
vern, junior women's honorary socie-
ty, were received by 11 juniors yester-
day. At the fali initiationto be held
at 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, the
following will be taken in:
Ruth Deemer, Edna Groff, Beata
Hasley, Catherine Larkin, Amy Loom-
is, Dana Pettibone, Evelyn Rockwell,
Margaret Schnaple, Doris Sprague,
Hazel Storz, Frances Weimer.
IlICHIGANENSIAN DRIVE
CLOSES; 2,050 COPIES SOLD
With total sales amounting to 2,050
copies, the Michiganensian subscrip-
tion drive was brought to a close yes-
terday afternoon.
Subscriptions will be taken for the
year book every afternon of next
week in the office of the Michigenen-
sian in the Press building, according
to B. H. Logan, '21, business manager.
THE LINEUPS
Michigan Position Ohio State
Cappon ......L.E........ Myers
Goetz ........L.T....Huffman
(Capt.) (Capt.)
Dunne......L.G.......Taylor
Vick .........C.......Nemecek
Wilson... ...R.G......... Trott
Johns......R.T....... Spiers
Goebel.....R.E... N Workman
DunnB.......Q.B.. H Workman
UsherL.......H Stinchcomb
Steketee.R.H.......Bliss
Nelson.....F.B. Willaman
OFFICIALS -
Referee - Walter Eckersall,
Chicago.
Umpire-Harvey Snyder, Har-
vard.

Filed judge-L. Gardner, Il-
linois.
Head linesman-E. E. Prugh,
Ohio Wesleyan.
Time of game-2 'oclock

T H CCEPREPARE FOR STIFF
ENCOUNTER TDA
FOOTBALL KING IN COLUMBUS.;-
OHIO ROOTERS LOOK FOR
CLOSE GAME
VARSITY RECEIVES HARD
WORKOUT BEFORE GAME
MIchigan's Task Will Be to Stop
Speedy Backs and Open
Game of Ohio
(Special to The Daily)
Columbus, Nov. 5.-The Michigan
team and coaches are set for a stiff
battle with the title seeking Ohio
eleven tomorrow. Every player and
all the mentors realize the hard and
important battle which confronts
them and they are all prepared to give
Ohio their best. A win will keep them
in the race for the title whereas a
defeat will put them in the second di-
vision.
A short hard workout was given the
eleven this afternoon with emphasis
on passing and kicking. Stekete,
Dunn, and Van Orden sent off punts
of about 40 yards and with Dunn and
Banks holding the ball, Goebel, Per-
rin, and Steketee tried kicking field
goals. Yost may use Perrin as a
place kicker for both he and Stek
were sending the ball over the bars
with regularity from the 30-yard line.
Harley on Deck
Chick Harley was down to .look
over the men before guards were
placed around to keep spectators
away. Both first and second teams
were run through snappy signal drill,
nothing except straight playsp'being
used. In case Goebel or Cappon are
injured, it is probable that Usher or
Cohn will be shifted to an end.
Michigan supporters are gradually
arriving, some coming with the team
and others dropping in from time to
time. By evening the lobby of the
New Southern became thronged with
student and alumni rooters.'The crest
of the incoming wave of Michigan
supporters was reached late in the
evening when the loaded autos and
late train brought many into the city.
Team in Good Shape
The ride from Ann Arbor to Co-
lumbus was uneventful, the team re-
tiring in its special Pullman at an
early hour. Tonight Trainer Hahn
has ordered the men in bed by 10
o'clock. The team is in good physi-
cal condition with the exception of
Wieman, whose injured knee will
keep him from playing.
No Ohio over confidence is evident.
Michigan goes into the second
Western Conference game of the sea-
son today, meeting Ohio State univer-
sity on the Columbus gridiron. A win
by the Wolverine eleven will keep the
Ann Arbor team in the Big Ten race,
while a defeat, added to that admin-
istered by Illinois, will put Michigan
in the second division for the rest of
the year.
Ohio Backs Are Speedy
Michigan will have a hard task to
stop Coach Wilce's three speedy
backs, Willaman, Stinchcomb, and
Harry Workman. The combination of
open field and aerial attack that this
trio puts on the field has already
won two Conference games, and will
prove dangerous for any opponent

that -the Wilcemen meet this year.
Michigan has been coached to stop
the open game of Ohio State, both the
backs and line being instructed in the
blocking and intercepting of passes.
In Jack Dunn, Michigan has one of
the cleverest open field runners in
the Conference. The fight and pep
which Dunn puts into the Michigan
team will carry the eleven to vic-
tory if any one factor will have any
influence.
(Continued on page Three)

F. King, L. Van Horn. Another meet- secured at the box office in Hill audi-
ing of the assembly will be held later torium, while season tickets are still
in the month. on sale at the bookstores.

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aturday, Nov. 6, 2 to"5[P. M.
dent Dance
AN UNION

Bob's

University

Jazz

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