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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 04, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univ
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherw~
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the, postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as seco
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the s
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily att
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily ofii
Unsigned communications will receive no cpnsideration. No rma
uscriptwill be returnedunless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentimentsc
pressed in the comnmunications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clo
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ............GEORGE O. BROPHY J

er.
for
vie
and
ig-
of
the
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an-
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R.

doors at night has opened a tempting field of ope-
ration for a band of petty thieves. The quickest
and most feasible method of stopping these rob-
beries lies with the fraternities themselves.
As none of the Greek letterites appear to be es-
pecially anxious to find out "what that noise is
in the, small hours of the morning, it might be sug-
gested that spring locks be installed and a number
of keys be made for the doors and these be dis-
tributed among the members. If this is done the
activities of the prowlers can be stopped.

News Editor .............................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Edito's-
T. Id. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J.I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor...............................J. A. Bernstein
Editorials..... ..Lee.Woodruff, Robert Sage, T. J. Xhinery
Assistant News...................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sportsw.........................................Robert Angell
Women's Editor...... ........................Mlary D. Lane
Telegraph .................... ....... West Gallogly
Telescope......................................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Frances Oberholtzer L. Armstrong Kern
Paul G. Weber Robert E. Adams Hughston McBain
AlmenafBarlow Norman C. Damon Frank H. McPike
Elizabeth Vickery Byron Darnton Gerald P. Overton
G. E. Clark" Thomas E. Dewey E'dward Lambrecht
George Reindel Wallace F. Elliott William H. Riley Jr.
Dorothy Monfort Leo J. Hershdorfer Sara Waller

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Most of us are capable of carrying on some out-
side activity. All of our time is not devoted to the
strictly scholastic side of college life. The major-
ity of us have one or more outside activities. That
"or more" is the subject of this editorial.
To many of us try wholeheartedly to make a
success of several things at once and as a result
fail to do any one thing well. Diversity of ambi-
tions is the cause of our downfall here as it is apt
to be in later life, if we do not pick out one objec-
tive and keep everlastingly at it.
Underclassmen who wish to do something for
their University and for themselves should pick out
some one thing-publications, athletic manager-
ships, Union committee work, it 'matters not
which-and stick to that one thing through all of
their college years.
Those who do this and do it conscientiously will
deserve to get an important office in the elections at
the end of their junior year.
Having achieved success in some one thing, the
hard worker will find that his services are in de-
mand for other activities during his final year.
What is still better, he will step in, not as a tryout,
but rather as a leader.

STICK TO ONE ACTIVITY

1

G 2AHAM

."_

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Valuable Papers
Given to Library
Judge C. B. Grant, '58, presented the
Library with a manuscript poem by
the first president of the University,
Dr. Henry P. Tappan.
The manuscript is in the form of a.
letter to Mrs. W. W. Murphy and is in
the president's handwriting. Dr. Tap-1
pan wrote a number of poems, of
which only a few were published.
Two notes written and signed by
General George Washington were giv-
en to the Library by Mr: .M. A. Ives,
of Ann Arbor. One note is an order
to release a military prisoner from
jail on petition of the citizens of Dan- 4
bury.
The other is a pass permitting the
bearer and his negro servant to getj
by the pickets at Ramapo. Both notes
are in fragile condition and are good
specimens of Washington's handwrit-
ing.
Another gift, which was presented,
to the Library by Ernest F. Lloyd, of

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Efect Nov. 2, 1920
Betwee
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
mited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. im.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p M.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. im.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jacksou--7 : b0 a. M., and
12:10 p.m.

OCTOBER
S M T W T F S
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
30
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory. Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

(Two Stores)
Agents for ROYCROFTEKS
CRAHAM

BOTH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK

Harry B. Grundy

1

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ....".....LEGRAND A. GAINES J1

R.

Advertising ........................ ... P. Joyce
Classifieds.......................................Robt. 0. Kerr
Publication.......................................F. M. Heath
Accounts ........................................E., R. Prichis
Circulation......................................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
R. W. Labrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
R. G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
J. J. Hamel Jr. D. S. watterworth

j

NOW IS THE TIME TO PLACE YOUR ORDER
FOR
PERSONAL CHRISTMAS GREETING
CARDS
PRINTED OR ENGAVED
THE MAYER - SCHAIRER CO,
STATIONERS, PRINTERS AND J$INDERS
QFFICE OUTFITTERS
Pone 1404 112 Qth 3 Not stroot

SEND THE YELL LEADER

r . __ _ __

The night editors for the week will be: Monda
night, J. I. Dakin; Tuesday night, T. F. Adams
Wednesday night, T. W. Sargent; Thursdal
night, H. W. Hitchcock; Friday night, J. I. Dakin
Saturday night, J. E. McManis.
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for an;
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charg
of all news to be printed that night..
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1920.

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KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
Michigan's student publications, The Daily, The
Michiganensian, the Gargoyle, the Chimes, the
Students' Directory, the Wolverine, and the Ath-
letic program are published and controlled by the
Board in ,Control of Student Publications. This
organization consists of five members of the fac-
ulty, three of whom act as president, supervising
manager, and critic, besides three students, one of
whom is secretary.

.
s
-.

Michigan is going to have a record student repre-
sentation at the Ohio State game Saturday. But
without an official yell leader, the cheering of the
rooters will be ineffective. - A conference ruling
prevents the Athletic association from using its
funds to send the Varsity cheer leader. The mat-
ter, therefore, lies in the hands of the students, who
must act quickly.
A small amount is all that is needed to cover the
expenses of one man. If all those who are loyal
enough to turn out to send the team off will raise
their school spirit one point farther and contribute,
the Michigan rooters will be led with the usual pep
and efficiency.

3
i

Ann Arbor;is a typewritten paper des-
cribing the earthquake in Peru in 1868.
INTERPRETATIVE DANCES TO
BE GIVEN AT THE WHITNEY

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Fokine and Kokina are to appear at
the Whitney theater Saturday night,
Nov. 6, in a program of Russian inter-.
pretive dances. According to all re-
ports the performances promises to be
a rare opportunity for the public to
see something really worth while.
Fokine established his reputation
when he directed the staging of the'
Diaghileff ballet at the New York
Hippodrome, featuring Nijinski.

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"Detroit Alumni to ,Smoke During Ohio Stat(
Game."-Daily head. Yes, and at the same time
eleven.men from Columbus are going to be having
a hot time of it.
Snap out of it, you leatherneck. Scrape the mud
off thase O. D.'s and march with your buddies on
Armistice Day.

GET YOUR TICKET FOR THE SPECIAL
Fifteen hundred students have purchased tick-
ets for the O. S. U. football game in Columbus.
Of this number, only one hundred have applied at
the Union for railroad tickets on the Michigan
special. Judging by similar occasions in the past,
the "last minute" contingent is going to be so large
as to swamp the special, which will carry only cars
enough to accommodate the persons to whom
tickets have actually been sold.
The Union must know by 8 o'clock tonight just
how many are going, as the railroad company has
set that time as the limit for ordering the necessary
cars. Michigan is going to that game en masse,
and a large proportion of the fifteen hundred are
undoubtedly planning to take the special. They
will save themselves and others the discomfort of
standing up from Ann Arbor to Columbus by ap-
plying for their tickets on the special today.

The Telescope

Subscribe for that Ensian!

ORDER AN AIJTO
when you wish to go calling
or shopping. Just phone us
when and where you want it
and it will be at your door
waiting for you onl th min-
ut . Our auto livery service
is efficient in every detail and
it is not expensive. Yqu will
find it sstisfactqry in every
way and we invite you tQ
give it a trial.
CITY TAXI - Phiohe 240

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When you've suggested to a friend
You wish he'd buy for you a coke,
What answer could be sadder than
"Sorry, Bud, but I'm dead broke."

First stude-I know a student here who has been
on a hunger strike since school started.
Second-On a hunger strike since school started?
Why, that's impossible.
First-Not at all. He's been boarding that
length of time at an Ann Arbor boarding house.

The other day one of our readers wrote in and
called us a "near wit."
For the benefit of those who may not know what
a "near wit" is we'll say he's the bird who, when he
finds a strawberry in the strawberry shortcake at a
church social exclaims, "Ah, welcome little stran-
ger."

e.

THE FRENCH FELLOWSHIPS
Every war, whatever its purpose, has some bene-
ficial results. The recent world conflict, though it
claimed the lives of millions of human beings and
caused irreparable destruction of homes and prop-
erty, succeeded in establishing among the youth of
America and France a feeling of mutual under-
standing and fraternity of spirit. That this atti-
tude, which characterized the relations of the arm-
ies of both nations during the war, might be per-
petuated among future generations, there was or-
ganized a society known as the American Field
Service Fellowships for French Universities.
One hundred and twenty-seven men of the Field
service gave their lives in the cause of democracy,
and as a lasting memorial to these men, this or-
ganization will endow, commencing with the year
1921, twenty-five fellowships annually, each for a
year of study in French universities. By this
means, the society hopes to bring into closer con-
tact the scholars of the two countries.
Students would do well to set their aims at at-
taing one of these fellowships, for aside from the
moral aspect, they present an opportunity, for study
in universities which rank high among the world's
institutions of learning.
A SUGGESTION TO FRATERNITIES
Fraternity robberies have been of frequent oc-
currence during the past month. No doubt the
laxity of the campus clubs in failing to lock their

F t

says V etty lutterl

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Dear Noah:
What is meant by the expression "untold
wealth ?"' Stude.
That's the money you forget to mention when
Dad writes and wants to know how much you have
left: from last month's allowance.

One girl is.,a firm believer in the proverb that
"the way to reach a man is through his stomach."
One night last week after we had tasted her latest
culinary effort we failed to wax enthusiastic, so
she hastened to explain:
"You know, of course, Jack, I made that pie di-
rectly out of the family cook book."
"I dont' doubt it," we lightly rejoined, "because
the piece we had must have been mode out of the
covers."
And after that both of us seemed to have lost
our appetites.

You will agree to help our "team to win

-

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C

The freshman stood on State street,
He didn't hear the car.
They placed him in a pill box
And sent him to his ma.

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started

Pamous Closing Lines
never too late to be Gin," he muttered as he
to boil the home brew.
NOAH COUNT.

- ..

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