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November 04, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-04

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..,........o

THE BAND TO

O. S. U.

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ttlx

ASSOCIATI
PRESS

and MINNESOTA Too

DAY A'NDNIGHT 1WIRE
SERVICE

I'

I

VOL. XXXI. No. 27. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

I

REPUBLICAN WAVE
STILL RISES AS
RETURNS COME IN
SENATE MAJORITY SECURED;
TEN AS COMPARED
WITH TWO
CHAMP CLARK, FORMER
HOUSE LEADER, LOSES
Hge Majorities Assure Harding and
Coolidge at Least 34
Electoral Votes
(By Associated Press)
New York, Nov. 3.--The crest of
the Republican election wave, both
presidential and congressional, con-
tinued rising tonight as belated re-
turns filtered in .
Among new Democratic casualties
were defeats of Representative
Champ Clark of Missouri, former
speaker and present Democratic lead
et in the house; election of the Re-
publican congressman from Texas;
re-election of a Republican senator
from Missouri, and a steady jump of
Senator Harding into the lead in Ok-
lahoma. Another border state, Ten-
nessee, hung by a narrow margin but
with the Democrats leading.
G. 0. P. Senate Majority
A Republican senate majority ot
about 10 as compared with 2 at pres-
ent, and a house mlajority around 100
as against 40, were other forecasts
of the overwhelming majority. With
about eight states still on the doubt-
ful list in presidential and senatorial
contests the huge -majorities assurei
Harding and Coolidge of at least 346
electoral votes, with Governor Cox
certain only of 127 and all from the
"solid South" including Kentucky.
The Republicans today added Idaho,
Maryland, and South Dakota to their
string on the face of large majorities
and in the remaining states the Re-
publicans are reported leading in Ok-
lahoma, Arizona, Missouri, Montana.
Nevada and North Dakota. Democratic
margins were reported in New Mexi-
co and Tennessee.
Lenroot Wins
Among Republican senators elect-
ed in hard contests were: Lenroot of
Wisconsin, who was opposed vigor-
ously by Senator LaFollette, Spen-
cer of Missouri, who defeated Breck-
enbridge Long, former assistant sec-
retary of state, and Jones of Wash-
ington, chairman of the senate com-
mittee on commerce.
Senator Phelan of California was
defeated by Samuel M. Shortridge
Republican; Senator Smith, a Demo-
cratic veteran, lost to . E. Weler,
Republican; SenatortNugent, Demo-
crat of Idaho, was defeated by for-
mer Governor Gooding.
MICHIGAN RETURNS
Detroit, Nov. 3. - Michigan had
given Senator Harding a lead of 400,-
719 over Governor Cox, rolled up a
majority of 333,413 for Alex J. Groes-
beck; Republican candidate for gov-
ernor, and elected Republicans to all
the state offices, on the face of re-
turns tonight. Substantial majorities
were also given candidates for the
legislature.
The vote for president in 2,019 pre-
cincts out of 3,781 was: Harding
565,432; Cox 164,713; for governor:
2,037 precincts gave Groesbeck 561,-

751 and Woodbridge M. Ferris 228,-
338.
Returns from 1841 precincts gave a
vote of more than 2 to 1 against a
constitutional amendment which
would in effect abolish private and
parochial schools.
HARDING RESTS
Marion, Nov. 3. - Warren G. Hard-
ing spent his first day as president-
elect resting from the tension and
reviewing late returns with particular
attention to the makeup of the 57th
congress.
He expressed keen pleasure as the
growing figures confirmed a Repub-
lican gain in both senate and house,
for he had told his friends that his
greatest apprehension over the out-
come had not been a fear of defeat
for himself so much as a realization
that, as chief executive, his hands
might be tied by lack of a working
party majority in the legislative
branch.

TICKETS FOR BRYAN
LECTURE ON SALE
"But Where the Nine?" This is the
title which William Jennings Bryan
has chosen for his address to be giv-
en at 8 o'clock Saturday evening in
Hill auditorium. This lecture will be
the first of a series of 10 being con-
ducted under the auspices of the Or.
atorical association.
In a letter recently received by
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood, of the
department of oratory, Mr. Bryan ex-
plained that the purpose of his lec-
ture was to point out the attitude of
citizens of republican governments in
respect to education, religion, and
right of franchise. During the past
summer, Mr. Bryan, the letter states,
has spoken approximately 100 times
on the same subject.
Tickets for the lecture are now on
sale at the bookstores and other
convenient places on the campus. It
is suggested that those desiring sea-
son tickets for the reserved section
for the entire course of lectures pro-
cure them as soon as possible, as
only a few more remain unsold.
BA4ND BOUNCE SALE
OPENS ON CA-MPUS

_ _ _ _
"-------- - ---- -'-- t

REGENTS APPROVE
PLAN Of ALUMNUS
FOR DORMITORIES

SEND THE TEAM OFF

PROPOSITION DOES NOT
CONSTRUCTION IS
IMINENT

MEANI

Four o'clock is the time, the steps of Hill auditorium the
place. The occasion is the send-off of the Varsity to Ohio State.
We can't all go to Columbus, but we can all show the team that
we are behind it to a man. The band will lead the procession to
the Ann Arbor station, where Michigan's eleven will entrain at 4:50
o'clock.
The Wolverine team has shown the kind of spirit this fall that
merits the loyal and enthusiastic support of the whole student
body. Undaunted by the heart-breaking defeat at the hands of
Illinois, the Varsity is going to O. S. U. with more determination
than ever.
Do we want to come back after the defeat by Ohio last year?
Do we want to show the Buckeyes what Michigan spirit can do?
Do we want to inspire the football men to superhuman efforts Sat-
urday? Then be on hand and make it the greatest send-off a team
was ever given!

Large Number of Tickets Must
Sold Before Tomorrow Night
to Insure Trip

Be

VARIED ACTS WILl FEATURE
PROGRAM OFFERED BY BAND
An intensive Band Bounce ticket
campaign, on the success of which
lepends the sending of the Varsity
band to Ohio State Saturday, will be
opened on the campus today. Not
:nly will it be necessary to have a
large attendance at the production,
but a large number of tickets must
be sold in advance as the cash is
needed before the hour of the open-
1ng of the bounce.
"It will take active interest on
everyone's part," said H. P. Lindsay,
'21, "to help the band put its punch
behind the team on the Buckeye's field
and push the Wilcemen across their
goal line for a Michigan victory."
Fraternity men holding Band
Bounce tickets are urged to push
their sale, as the tickets will be on
sale only today and tomorrow.
A mystery act, "Nuts Gathered by
the Campus Squirrel," is one of the
numbers, and Knight Mirrieless, '21E,
with his bunch will be on the kill.
Some of the old time college songs
are promised by the Varsity quar-
tette, and there will be divers num-
bers of music and comedy skits.
FARNHAM COMES AT
BURTON'S REQUEST
Charles W. Farnham, an attorney
of St. Paul, Minn., comes to Ann Ar-
bor at the personal invitation of
President Marion L. Burton to deliv-
er an address on the subject, "The-
odore Roosevelt," at 4 o'clock Friday
afternoon in Hill auditorium.
Mr. Farnham delivered this ad-
dress last spring before the students
of the University of Minnesota, and
according to President Burton it drew
more interest among the students
than any other speech during the
three years of his presidency there.
At that time President Burton invit-
ed Mr. Farnham to give his address
before the students of Michigan.
"He does not pose as a technical
historian," said President Burton in
speaking of Mr. Farnham. "He is 'a
lawyer who regards it as his mission
to help the country to an understand-
ing of the life and character of The-
odore Roosevelt.
"His lecture abounds in original
material presented in a most interest-
ing and attractive fashion," he add-
ed. "All lovers of Mr. Roosevelt will
feel they have made a wise use of the
hour if they hear this lecture."
Admission to the lecture will be
free.
Millerand Appears Without Guard
Paris, Nov. 3. - President Miller-
and has amazed some of the old res-
idents of Paris by appearing on the
streets of the city apparently without
a guard.

BUILDINGS WOULD BE
PUT UP AS INVESTMENT
Continuation of Housing Bureau Rec-
ommended by Board; Summer
Pay Increases Granted
Approval was given yesterday by
the Board of Regents to the plan of
a Michigan alumnus for the construc-
tion of privately owned dormitories
for men students as a partial solu-
tin to the housing problem. Such
dormitories, if built, must be abso-
lutely fire proof and under the con-.
trol of University authorities.
The proposition was placed before
the meeting of the regents by an
alumnus who is considering the pro-
motion of a company to build dormi-
tories as an investment and who
wished to ascertain the attitude of
the regents. The action taken by
them in no way indicates that these
dormitories are to be erected, how-
ever.
Housing Bureau Contnu'ed
Continuation of the housing bureau
for the present was recommended by
the regents. The regents adopted res-
olutions of deep regret on the death
of the late Prof. I. N. Demmon of
the English department. Three in-
structors were added to the staff of
the Rhetoric department to help re-
lieve the pressure resulting from in-
creased enrollment.
Salary increases for faculty mem-
bers teaching in the Summer session
were approved.
Recommendation was made for
moving the pharmacy of the Health
service from the Chemistry building
to room M-140 on the first floor of
the Natural.Science building, to make
it more convenient for students. It
is planned to keep the pharmacy
open longer hours each day after it is
moved into the new location. The
dental clinic for Ann Arbor school
children will be continued.
Bates Reports Gift
Dean H. M. Bates of the Law school
reported the gift to the University of
a collection of briefs and legal pe-
riodicals from the library of the late
Otto Kirchener. One hundred and
fifty steel lockers will be purchased
for Barbour gymnasium.
The regents recommended contin-
uation of the press bureau in connec-
tion with the journalism classes, and,
arrangements will be made to give a
banquet on the evening of Dec. 2 for'
editors of the state who attend the
meeting of the Press club Dec. 2'
and 3.
G, 0. P. PLURALITY IN
COUNTYLARGEST EVER-
OVERWHELMING VUTE RETURNED
FOR HARDING AND GROES.
BECK

ROADS FROM TOELDO
TO COLUMBUS ARE FAIR
A telegram received yesterday
morning from the Toledo Auto-
mobile club reads as follows:
"Roads Ann Arbor to Toledo
good. Toledo to Columbus fair."
Signed, Toledo Automobile club.
The road from Ann Arbor to
Columbus as outlined by the De-
troit News auto service depart-
ment, is as follows: Ann Arbor
south to Toledo, south to Find-
ley, to Kenton, to Marysville,
to New California, to Dublin,
to Marble Creek station, to Col-
umbus, entering on Fifth avenue.
The route Is indicated on the
telegraph poles along the road
by AAA No. 472. The total dist-
ance is about 185 miles.
Soldier Virtuoso
Will R~ender Own
compositions
Lieutenant Albert Spalding, Amer-
ica's premier violinist, will make his
Ann Arbor debut in the initial recital
of the Extra Concert series at 8
o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium.
Lieutenant Spalding's interpretive
power is unbounded, and the program
which he has arranged for the occa-
sion affords many opportunities for
the exhibition of his technique and
tonality.
In justice to his creative powers,
Lieutenant Spalding has included in
the program two of his recent com-
positions, "Castles in Spain," and
"Lettre de Chopin." An uncommon
eventtof the evening will be his play-
ing the adagio and fuge movements
from Bach's "Sonata in G minor"
without accompaniment.
The program follows:
z
Sonata in D .................Coreli
Grave-Allegro-Moderato-Adagio-
Allegro
AdagioandFuge from Sonata in
G minor.................Bach
(For violin alone)
II
Concerto in D minor .....Wieniawski
Allegro moderato-Romance-Alle-
gro moderato (alla Zingara)
III
Castles in Spain ............
Lettre de Chopin ...........Spalding
Eklog....................Kramer
Waltz....................Brahms
Carmen Fantasy ............Sarasate
COUNCIL BACK OF PLAN TO
SEND CHEERLEADER TO OHIO
In order to send a cheerleader to
Ohio State, a collection will be taken
up tomorrow among the crowd that
assembles for the team send-off. h.
W. Christie, '22D, was appointed last
night by the Student council as
chairman of the committee to take up
the collection.
The council hopes to select some
new contests for the Fall games this
year. The committee in charge has
been instructed to give as much va-
riety as possible in the program for
the morning of the Chicago game.
Renaud Sherwood, '22, was elected
recording secretary of the council to
replace F. L. Walters, '21L, resigned.

TICKET SELLING BOOTH IN
LOBBY CLOSES THIS EVENING
Only 125 students have signed up
to make the trip to Columbus on the
Union special train next Saturday
although about 2,200 tickets to the
game have been sold at the Athletic
office. It is estimated that half of
the seat reservations sold have been
taken by alumni, but allowing for
that, there are at least 1,000 stu-
dents who plan either to make the
trip by automobile or by another
train, or who have neglected to reg-
ister for the special.
Must Notify Railroad
As the Ann Arbor railroad must re-
ceive, not later than tonight, a noti-
fication of the number of cars that
will be needed for the special, the
selling booth in the Union will be
closed this evening.
The 125 students who have al-
ready signed up for the trip repre-
sent but few actual sales as this
number includes the members of the
freshman team and the Varsity band.
No more than 35 students other than
those included in those organizations
have registered, and 21 of these are
women. Announcement was made
yesterday that Mrs. Roy W. Cowden,
wife of Professor Cowden of the
rhetoric department, will accompany
the women as chaperon.
Will Not Order Extra Cars
Donald J. Thorpe, '21, chairman of
the Union's special train committee,
said yesterday that although he be-
lieved many more men than have al-
ready signed up were planning on
making the trip on the special, he
would not order any extra cars. "The
train will be made up to accommo-
date only those students who have
registered," he said. "We-cannot as-
sume the risk of ordering too many
cars, even if we are forced to turn
down eleventh hour applications." n
The special is scheduled to leave
Ann Arbor station at 7 o'clock Sat-
urday morning. Round trip fare, in-
cluding war tax, has been placed at
$14.78. The train will carry a cafe
car which will be in charge of the
Union.
SP ICIAL CAR TO
SMOKER PLANNED
Providing 50 men signify their in-
tention of attending the smoker to be
given by the Detroit alumni Saturday,
a special car will be chartered to
make the trip. It is necessary that
those men who intend to make the
trip into the city, sign up today. A
booth has been arranged at the desk
in the Union lobby for this purpose.
Final arrangements will be made with
the Detroit, Jackson and Chicago rail-
way immediately if the desired num-
ber of men is secured. The company
has made a round trip fare of $1.34
for the trip.
The smoker in Detroit is intended
for those who cannot go to Colum-
bus with the team. Returns will be
received from the scene of action and
will be recorded play by play on a
giant board.

ONLY 125 STUDENTS SIGN UP F'OR
UNION SPEILTRAIN TO COLUMBUS

Ann

Arbor Railroad Must Be Notified
Tonight of Number of Cars
Desired

HUGE CROD FO
..
BAND MEETS AT HILL AUDITOR.
IUM PROMPTLY AT 3:45
O'CLOCK
ALL STUDENTS URGED
BY PORTER TO ATTEND
Procession Will Leave for Station at
4:15; to March Through
Streets of City
TO TAKE COLLECTION
A collection by a Student
council committee will be taken
today among the crowd at the
team send-off to send the cheer-
leader to Ohio State.
huge crowd is expected. to be on
hand for the team send-off at 4:50
o'clock this afternoon from the Ann
Arbor station. Plans for the affair
have been completely arranged by the
Student council committee, and Don-
aid Porter, '21, chairman, late last
night issued an urgent appeal for
every student to be on hand.
Meeting at Hill auditorium. at 3:4
o'clock, the Varsity band will parade
the streets around the campus to get
the students out by 4 o'clock, the
time of the meeting at Hill auditor-
ium.
Procession Leaves Promptly
Headed by the band, the procession
will leave the auditorium promptly at
4:15 o'clock, and on torchlighted
streets will march west on North Uni-
versity to State, north on State to
Huron, down Huron to Main, south on
Main to William, where the as-
semblage will move down to the Ann
Arbor station.
Forming four abreast, the students
will snake dance their ,way through
the main streets of the city, and as the
march is continued, Al Cuthbert, '21E,
and his team of yellmasters will lead
cheers. Permission for the procession
has been granted by Mayor E. M.
Wurster.
Real Demonstration- Planned
At the station a real demonstration
of Michigan spirit will be accorded the
Varsity, according to Donald Porter,
'21. "We want every man out to show
the team that Michigan is behind them
to a man."
In case of a heavy downpour, the
students will meet at the station, but
if there is only a light sprinkle or
snow, the original plans will be car-
ried through. The cars, which have
been placed at the disposal of the team
to carry the men from the field to the
station, should be at Ferry field
promptly at 4:15 o'clock.
LaCLASSES ELECT R
OFFICERS YESTERDAY

DENTS AND
BALLOT]

MEDICS ARE
FRIDAY MORN.
ING
all three of the Ia
yesterday resulted

Latest election returns in both Ann
Arbor and Washtenaw county show
the greatest Republican landslide ever
recorded here. In 1904, the largest
Republican year previous to 1920, the
county plurality was only 2,700, com-
pared with probably more than 10,000
this year.
But a single local official was elect-
ed on the Democratic ticket, Harry H.
Atwell, city surveyor, who ran with-
out opposition.
While returns were still incomplete
last night, the entire Republican tick-
et was then leading by more than two
to one, while Harding's average was
more than three to one against Cox.
with 10,151 votes recorded for the
former and 3,132 for the latter. Debs
had 17 votes in 23 out of 37 precincts.
Every precinct went Republican for
the first time on record.
Groesbeck polled 10,272 votes
against 6,046 for Ferris out of 27 pre-
cincts recorded last night. The school
amendment was losing heavily with
incomplete figures showing 2,205 for
it and 4,953 against it.

Elections in
school classes

the selection of George Bouchari
senior president. Other senior c
ers are: E. Martinek, vice-presid
Ernest Zigler, secretary; and G
Wolfe, treasurer.
Junior laws elected the follo'
officers: James Spier, presid
Richy Reaville, vice-president; F
Eaton, secretary; and C. W. C
treasurer.
The following officers were chi
by the freshman law class: Fra
Chadwick, president; Thomas Do
erty, vice-president; Elmer Step
sohn, secretary; and Harold J
treasurer.
Dental college elections will be
off from 10 to 12 o'clock ThursdE
corridors of the Dental building.
Medical school class elections
scheduled for Friday morning or
main floor of the Medical buildin

THE WEATHER,
Unsettled; Probably h

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