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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 03, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-03

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psis.,

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY '
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper-and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cleas matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, z4t4.
Comnunications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
oature not nrecessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at Lthe
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incleses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.'
"What's Going On" notices wilt not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR :...... GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
New. Editor ...........................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
T. H. Adams H. WV. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
3. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday dtr...... ..................3.A. Bernstein
Editorals.or..... ee-Woodruff, Robert Sage,'T. J, Whinery
Assistant News ...................... . .. -E. P Lovejoy Jr.
Sports. ,...........:................... Robert Angell
Women's Editor................ . . ........Mary D. Lane
Telegraph. . ................ ............Wbest Galiogly
Telescope. .................................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
osephine Waldo Frances Oberholtzer I,. Armstrong Kern
PsuG. Weber Robert E. Adams Hughston McBain
Almena Barlow Norman C. Damon Frank H. McPike
lizabeth Vickery Byron Darnton Gerald P. Overton
G. E. Clark Thomas I. Dewey Edward Lambrecht
George Reindel Wallace F. Elliott William H. Riley Jr.
Dorothy Monfort Leo J. Hershdorfer Sara Waller

LIaA

y

Harry . Grundy

BUSINELSS STAFF
Telephone 960

BUStNESS MANAGER.........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising..................................+.D. P. Joyce
Classifxede ........................ ..........,.Robt. 0. Kerr
Publication........... .......... ........... M. Heath
Accounts.... ................................ I. R. Priebs
Circulation. ................... .............V. F. Hillery
Assistants
R' W. Lambrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Root. L. Davis Thos, L. Rice
fester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
3. J. Hamel . D. S. Watterworth

wholly and unselfishly to bringing research to prac-
tical utility for .mankind.
GIVE THEM A MICHIGAN SENDOFF
"See -the team off for Columbus !"
These six woFrs should come as a welcome ad-
monition to a student body whose football spirit
has seldom been equaled. That this season must
andl will be successful has been imbeddied in the
mind of every Michigan man and woman during
every moment from the kickoff at the Case game
to the present. It appeared in striking relief, when,
fired by the boundless enthusiasm of its supporters,
and ignoring tremendous handicaps caused by in-
juries to essential stars, the Varsity fell short only
two points of defeating Illinois.
It is shown again in the current conviction that
because we were nosed out of one game our
chances for the Conference championship are not
lost. And this unbeatable football spirit flares up
like a flame in the determination of everyone on
the campus to beat undefeated Ohio.
It is impossible for all of us to communicate this
spirit to the Yostmen as they battle on the field next
Saturday, as we did when they met the Ilini. But
if we cannot be present then, we can do the next
best thing tomorrow. We can turn out to a man
and show the team as it leaves just how we will
feel while it is fighting on the Buckeye gridiron.
Show by your acts the spirit you feel and come
out for the mammoth sendoff the team is going to
get tomorrow. Help instil fight in 'the lghtinest
team in the Conference!"
FOR A MICHIGAN ART SCHOOL
With all the facilities which are provided here
for instruction in so many branches of learning, it
no doubt seems strange to the outsider that no
means is furnished at Michigan whereby one may
make an exhaustive study of drawing; painting,
sculpture, and the like, and receive regular credit
for it with a view to taking up one or another
branch of art work upon his graduation. With the
exception of courses intended primarily for the in-
struction of architects, no such provision is made
and the person who is interested primarily in such
subjects, has to go to Chicago or some other city
for his instruction.
An art school should be of value to the Univer-
sity itself, in that it would provide student talent
for the necessary art work on the Michiganensian
and other publications when students already skilled
along these lines were not readily available. It
should, moreover, prove an immense drawing card
for students interested in such subjects. But even
if we do not consider the good which could be de-
rived by the University itself from a college of art,
it seems unfortunate that students should have to
go elsewhere for such work when artistic appre-
ciation is so highly developed and when there are
such excellent facilities provided for work along
other lines right here at Michigan.
The class which least appreciates our good for-
tune in the leadership of President Burton must be
that of '24, if we may judge by the small attend-
ance at the freshman meetings he has addressed.
Whoever said "It'll be a cold day when either
Cox or Harding is elected president of this coun-
try" was some little weather prophet.
Traditions day is not the only time Michigan tra-
ditions should be kept in mind.
The oldest and worst campus emotion - antag-
onism toward sidewalks.
Snap into it, you gob, and get those ducks washed
for the eleventh.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
.(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p.,im. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e. ery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.n., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7 :5f0 a. mn., and
12:10 p.m.
Michigan Daily liners bring , re-
sults.-Adv.
EXra Cocert

OCT OBER
S M TWT T F S
1 2
3 4 6 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 16 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
30
MIen : Last season's hats turn-
ed Inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

Your Leather Coat Is Dirty
k The ordinary method of cleaning
leaves them spotted and faded.
a leather coat to get the results you
seek, our process of dying a brows
leather coat, a mahoganycolor or blai
has proved a success all over the country judging from
satisfied customers.
We are the Largest Leather Dye House in Chicago
and on account of the g reat demand for the cleaning of
Leather Automobile and Sort Coats, we have made
special efforts in this direction.
For a reasonabl charge from $6.00 to $8.00 we are
prepared to renew your coat.
Our facilities for dying and process of finishing
enables us to return to you practically anew coat gear-
anteeing the workmanship as well as entire satisfaction.
Send your coat by registered parcel post. We will
return cat to you by regstered mail.
Frank Jackson Co4,3O1 Larrabee St., Cbicago

Series

GRAHAM

(Two Stores)
Agents for ROYCROFTERS
GRAHAM

BOTH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK

We Carry Complete Lines of
Gordon & Ferguson
Lamb and Sheep Lined
Fur Collared Coats

i

HILL AUDITORIUM

.I a .+

The night editors for the week will be: Monday
night, J. I. Dakin; Tuesday night, T. F. Adams;
Wednesday night, T. W. Sargent; Thursday
night, H. W. Hitchcock; Friday night, J. I. Dakin;
Saturday night, J. E. McManis.
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1920.
- KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
The Student Council is a representative group
from the entire student body whose function is to
regulate and properly supervise, or govern, stu-
dent affairs. Its members are elected once a year
at. an all-campus election and are chosen from the
various classes of the different colleges of the Uni-
versity.
"THE VICTORS" IN COLUMBUS
Friday night the first Band Bounce of the year
will be held in Hill auditorium. This year the
Bounce will have a peculiar significance, different
and relatively more important than those of former
years, for the proceeds from this affair will be the
sole means of permitting the Varsity band to make
the trip to Columbus for the Michigan-O. S. U.
football game. A sense of appreciation and loyalty
to the band should alone be sufficient reason to
prompt every student to do his or her share by pur-
chasing one or more tickets for the Bounce. ,
Aside from this, another element enters in-that
of the value of the Bounce as an entertainment.
The program for the evening will include a con-
cert by the band ensemble, playing those stirring
songs which have gained for it its present enviable
reputation among other college bands. There will
also be five vaudeville acts, intermingling jazz mu-
sic and terpsichore, coredy and harmony, each act
a feature in itself, and with men as entertainers
whose previous records in campus performances as-
sure a peppy, laugh-from-beginning-to-end show.
For these two reasons, it is the duty of every
loyal Michigan man and woman to lend his moral
and financial support by attending the Band
Bounce. Let's hear "The Victors" in Columbus.
THE NOBEL PRIZE
Few events have so stirred the pride of America
as the awarding of the Nobel prize to President
Theodore Roosevelt for his part in ending the Rus-
so-Japanese war. But this medal, awarded for
achievement in literature as well as in peacemaking,
for scientific achievement as well as for statesman-
ship, has been given during the past year to a man
who, not devoting his genius to those branches of
humanitarian research which receive the greatest
popular recognition, nevertheless has performed a
great service to the world in his medical discov-
eries.
Professor Bordet, member of the group of Bel-
gian professors who are visitors at Michigan, and
winner of the great world-award for 1920,
neither started nor ended a war, nor has his life
of hard work at his profession been spectacular in
any degree. But men such as he, whose achieve-
ments are passed on and incorporated into new
cures, and preventatives, save their millions where
the great Roosevelt saved his thousands. To sci-
ence goes the tribute of this year's Nobel prize: to
.eee and the type of mind and character devoted

NOVEMBER 4
ALBERT SPALDING
Violinist
ANDRE BENOIST, Accompanist
America's finest violinist who gave
up his art during the war and won
great distinction as a Lieutenant in
the Aviation Corps.
NOvEIBER 13
UNITED STATES
MARINE BAND
WILLIAM H. SANTELMAN, Leader
ARTHUR S. WHITCOMB,
Cornet Soloist
This organization, famous for a
century and a quarter, has played at
every presidential Inaugural since
that of Thomas Jefferson. For the
first time in nearly a decade it has
been permitted to leave Washington
for a brief tour, Ann Arbor, through
the co-operation of the Chamber of
Conmerce, being one of the few music
centers to be visited.

WadhamsF& C.

TWO COMPLETE STORES

STATE STREET

MAIN STREET

S - ~

I

U

- :,

DECEMBER 2

/ \ :
c _ 'I
<z jIL

PERCY GRAINGER
Pianist
ir. Grainger is recognized as one
of the world's greatest artists. He is
also famous as a composer and con-
ductor.

I

J

JANUARY 10

Almost time for the borrowing of dress
to start.

suits

THE

O V E R

C OAT S

The Telescop e
"Listening to your sweet voice," I said,
"Almost makes me soar."
And now I wonder why it is
She speaks to me no more. '
Girls, a Chance to Be Original
If a girl wants to be dressed differently from
nine-tenths of her sisters on the campus all she
has to do is buy a nice long fur coat - and then
refuse to wear it.
Dear Noah:
The other day while in Detroit I bought me a
suit of underwear which I now find is too long in
the sleeves. Is there anywhere in Ann Arbor that
I can change this suit? '24.
Yes, there are any number of places where you
might change it, but we would recommend your
own room for this purpose.
What has become of the old fashioned humorist
who used to crown himself the king of merrymak-
ers by this little monologue:
"I think I have absolutely the rottenest room in
Ann Arbor. Why, do you know, the other night
my roommate woke me up at two in the morning
and says, "Wake up; the gas is escaping." And I
just turned over and said, "Well, what of it. You
can hardly blame -it."

FLONZALEY QUARTET
ADOLFO BETTI, First Violin
ALFRED POCHON, Second Violin
LOUIS BAILLY, Viola
IWAN D'ARCHAMBEAU, 'Cello
The most perfect string cguartet
ever assembled.

FEBRUARY 28
NEW YORK

IN DEVELOPING A SERIES OF OVER-
COA T STYLES FOR COLLEGE MEN,
FINCHLEY HAS GI VEN EXTRA OR-
DINA R Y CONSIDERA TION TO THE
DEGREE OF COMFORT REQUIRED BY
THE COLLEGE MAN OF A CTIVITY.
THE MODELS A RE RESTRAINED
IN STYLE BU T ENfOY THE CHAR-
ACTER AND ELEGANCE COM-
MONLY ASSOCIA TED WITH THE
WORK OF THIS ESTABLISHMENT.

CHAMBER MUSIC

SOCIETY

CAROLYN BEEBE, Director and
Pianist
ANDRE TOURRET, First Violin
HERBERT CORDUAN, Second Violin
SAMUEL LIFSCHEY, Viola
JACQUES RENARD, Violoncello
LU'DWIG MANOLY, Double Bass
WILLIAM KINCAID, Flute
GUSTAVE LANGENUS, Clarinet
HENRI DE BUSSOHER, Oboe
UGO SAVOLINA, Bassoon
JOSEF FRANZEL, French Horn
LAWRENCE WHITCOMB,
English Horn
TICI(ETS FOR TIlE COURSE
$2.00 - $2.50
SI(N(LE CONCERTS: $1.00, 75c, 50e

SIXTY DOLLARS. AND UPWARD

CUSTOM FINISH WITHOUT
THE ANNOYANCE OFA TRY-ON

' READY-TO-PUT-ON

324 South'State Street
ANN ARBOR, MICH.

No.-345-College

ENGINtERS -- you can
to
STUJDENTS'
Tracing Cloith, Draw
1 S. University. Home of t
pi gggaiganangniggig

Hake it in one jump-- WHERE?
the only
SUPPLY STORE
ving Paper, Blue Print Paper Etc
he Con-Proof Blue Books Phone IIOR

Famous Closing Liues
"Ha, close quarters," we mattered
friend refused to lend us two bits.
NOAH+

when our
COUNT.

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