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November 03, 1920 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-03

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SEND THE BAND TO

0. S. U.
and MINNESOTA Too

cZr r r i an

VOL. XXXI. No. 26. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

P

Em saUEUWE w a U EWE. EUnaa s

Groesbeck

No 'V

Far

Ahead Of Ferris

_. .._

REPULI CANTICKET
WINS TROUGHOUT
RETURNS FROM 922 PRECINCTS
FAVOR ATTORNEY
GENERAL
LEADS EX-GOVERNOR
BY LARGE MAJORITY
(By Associated Press)
Detroit, Nov. 3.-With a Republican
landslide in Michigan seemingly ap-
parent the entire Republican ticket
was far in the lead at 3:30 (Eastern
time) o'clock this morning when the
returns on state and national races
had been received from more than a
third of the precincts of the state.
On returns from 951 precincts,
FSenator Harding was leading Gov.
Cox by 147,953, his lead being
more than twice the number of votes'
cast for Cox.
Attorney General Groesbeck with
returns from 922 precincts, was lead-
ing former Governor Ferris by 97,-
173, or more than the total Ferris
votes in those districts.
CHA RLES HISGoCK mES
AFTER LUNG LLNESS
WAS PRO1INENT IN BANKING CIR-
CLES AND IN MASONIC
ORDER
Charles Eber Hiscock, prominent
Ann Arbor citizen and banker and a
leader in state Masonic circles, died
at his home Monday night.
Mr. Hiscock, who was 66 years old,
had been in ill health for some time
but he was not confined to his bed
until a short time previous to his
death. During his long and active
life Mr. Hiscock made a great num-
ber of friends throughout the state,
through his connections in Masonic
and banking circles.
Born Near Ann Arbor
Mr. Hiscock was born near Ann Ar-
bor March 1, 1854. He attended th
local schools until he was 15 years
old, at which time he entered the
employ of the Ann Arbor Savings
bank as messenger. He was made
cashier of that hank when he be-
came 21 years old. From 1901 to 1917
he was president, and since 1917 he
has been chairman of the board of
directors.
Mr. Hiscock served as mayor of
Ann Arbor twice and spent four
years on the council. He was pres-
ident of that body for two years.
High Masonic OfBcer
Besides having held at various
times most of the local offices in the
Masonic organization, Mr. Hiscock
has been grand commander of the
Grand Commandery of Michigan.
Mr. Hiscock is survived by one sis-
ter, Mrs. J. J. Read of Chicago, an
aunt, Mrs. Adelia Soule of Alliance,
Ohio, three nephews, Dana; Roy, ana
Walter Hiscock of this city, and by
two nieces, Miss Laura Read of Chi-
cago, and Mrs. McOmber of Milwau-
kee.
Funeral services in charge of the
Knights Templar will be held at the
home, 911 North Main street, at 3
o'clock Friday afternoon, the Rev. Ar-

thur W. Stalker officiating.
Harding Wins Oregon
Portland, Ore.-Returns from 243
incomplete precincts out of 1,699 give
Harding 1,352 and Cox 854.

School

Amendment Defeated

HARDING CARRIES
ROOSEVELT'S TOWN
Hyde Park, N. Y., Nov. 2.-
Complete returns from Hyde
Park, the home town of Frank-
lin D. Roosevelt, Democratic
vice-presidential nominee, give:
Harding, 279; Cox, 194.

VOTED DOWN BY
NEARLY _ TO1

At 3:30 o'Clock X63 Precincts
State Heard From; All
Opposed

in

Harding Leads Cox by
Three to One; Ferris
by Groesbeck

More Than
Beaten

MICHENER AHEAD OF MOORE
IN CONGRESSIONAL BATTLE
Washtenaw county fell in line with
the rest of =the country Tuesday and
returned overwhelming majorities for
the national, state and county Repub-
lican candidates.
At 2:30 o'clock this morning 21 pre-
cincts out of the 35 in the county had
reported 9,624 for Harding and 3,091
for Cox, the Republican presidential
candidate being given more than three
votes to the Democratic leader's one.
In not a single precinct reported had
Cox pushed ahead of Harding.
Goesbeck Leads
In the Michigan gubernatorial race,
Alexander J. Groesbeck, Republican,
led Woodbridge N. Ferris, Democrat,
in the county by almost two to one,
according to figures available from 24
precincts. The total vote for Groes-
beck in these precincts was 9,358, that
for Ferris was 5,040.
Returns on the school amendment
were not made in a majority of the
precincts before 2 o'clock this morn-
ing, but estimates at that time were
to the effect that the proposition was
voted down in the county by approx-
imately two to one.
Moore Defeated
Earl C. Michener, Republican can-
didate for congressman from the sec-
ond district carried the county by a
large majority, receiving in some pre-
cincts three votes to one for William

WASHTENAW COUNTY VOTES
WITH STATE ON AMENDMENT
Decisively defeated, if early returns
can be taken as representative of the
sentiment prevailing over the entire
state, the proposed amendment to the
Michigan constitution requriing child-
ren to attend only public schools, has
been branded by the citizens of the
state as undesirable.
At 3:30 o'clock this morning 563
precincts in the state, including 21
from Washtenaw county had been
heard from, regarding the amend-
ment. The vote was nearly 2 to 1
against the proposed change inn the
constitution, with the actual count
running 110,924 against, and only 58,-
011 in favor.
Returns Incomplete
This condition according to incom-,
plete returns from precincts in the
state which could supply no definite
figures, prevails there also. Telephone
and telegraphic reports from these
precincts declared that the amend-
ment would be defeated by a ratio
equal to if not greater than that es-
tablished by the 500 precincts that
had reported.
Washtenaw county measured up to
the average set by the state, voting
against the amendment fully 2 to 1.
ELECTION RETURNS
COME BY WIRELESS
Through the co-operation and as-
sistance of the signal corps unit of
the R. 0. T. C. and the University, The
Daily received election returns last
night by wireless.
Those who assisted in the work of
receiving the wireless messages were
Master Sargeant R. W. Collier of the
signal corps laboratory, and three stu-
dents, B. M. Bunting,. '21E, F. D.
Johnston, '22E, and P. G. Shlotter-
beck, '22E, whho operated the sets.
Two wireless sets were used in the

SENATOR HARDING IS
NOT OVER-EXULTANT
Convinced of his election War-
ren G. Harding issued a state-
ment saying that while feeling
exultant over the result he was
more given "to prayer to God to
make me capable of playing my
part."
Police Inspector, Sergeant and Two
Constables Shot in Latest
Irish Outbreaks
KILLOGLEN POLICE BARRACKS
DESTROYED BY IRISH REBELS
(Special by University and R. O. T. C.
Wireless)
Dublin, Nov. 2. - Reports of shoot-
ing and reprisals over the week end
continued to be received from vari-
ous parts of the country. The dis-
trict inspector of police was shot and
killed last night at Granard. At Cul-
lemore a police sergeant was wound-
ed and died.
Two constables were shot dead at
Killoglen last night. Armed consta-
bles captured and destroyed the lit-
tle town's police barracks last Sun-
day, taking all the arms and ammu-
nition.
Lawes Will Elect
Officers Today
Candidates for election to offlces of
the freshman, junior and senior
classes of the Law school will be vot-
ed on today.
Nominees of the freshman law class
are Francis Chadwick and Morris
White, president; Thomas Dougher-
ty and George Heidman, vice-presi-
dent; Elmer Stephenson and George
True, secretary; and Jerold O'Brien
and Harold Jones, treasurer.
In the junior class, Paul Gordon
and James Spier are candidates for
the presidency; Joseph Morrison and

INCOMPLETE RETURNS SHOW LANDSLIDES
IN MANY STATES AGAINST GOVERNOR
New York, Nov. 8.-(3:45 A. 11.).--The election of Warren G. H
as President of the United States of America was unquestionably ai
by the overwhelming Republican landslide that swept the eastern anc
die western states. By 8:80 o'clock this morning, sufficient returns iv
to make positive Harding's election as the next head of the nation.

RETENTION OF REPUBLICAN CONTROL
IN CONGRESS GUARANTEED1 SCORE
SENATORS PENROSE, BRANDGEE, SMOOT, UNDERWOOD, FLETCHER
RETURNED; McILINLEY ELECTED
IN ILLINOIS

r '_
""

(By Associated Press)
New York, Nov. 3. - Retention of
control of congress by the Republi-
cans appeared assured as a result of
yesterday's election. With returns in
at 3:30 this morning for about half
of the house membership, the Repub-
licans had scored a net gain of 16
members and incomplete senatorial
returns indicated an increase in the
upper house over the present major-
ity of two.
The Republican landslide in the
eastern and middle western states, it
appeared, was carried through some
Republican senatorial candidates
IO1LINIST WILL OPEN
EXTRA CONCERT SERIES
(By L L. N.)
Lieut. Albert Spalding, the distin-
guished American violinist, ill open
this year's Extra Concert series at b
o'clock Thursday evening in Hill aud-
itorium. He has prepared a very
unique and interesting program for
the event of his Ann Arbor debut.
The program will be supplemented
by interesting analytical notes writ-
ten by Dr. A. A. Stanley, president of
the University School of Music. These
notes have been planned as aides to
better appreciation of the individual
numbers.
COLUMBUS TICKETS
ON SALE AT UNION
Purchase of tickets for Columbus
before Thursday night by all those
intending to go to the Ohio State
game was .urged yesterday by Paul
Eaton, '21, president of the Union.
The necessity of wiring to Toledo
by Thursday night the- number of
cars that will be required to take care
of the people going was given as the
reason for the request.
Bearing the freshman team, the
Varsity band and the Michigan root-
ers, the train will leave the Ann Arbor
railroad station at 7:80 o'clock Sat-
urday morning for Toledo, where a
change of cars will be made for Co-
lumbus. The train will consist of
day coaches and a dining car, the
service in the diner to be operated by
the Union,
Tickets for the trip will be on
sale at the Union desk between the
hours of 10 and 12 and 8 and6 every
day until Friday bt accommodations
may be insufficient if the majority of
purchases are not made before
Thursday night. Tickets for women
are on sale at Dean Jordan's office at
any hour during, the day.
Further information concerning the
time the train will leave Columbus
will be announced later by the com-
mittee in charge.

whose seats had been claimed confa-
dently by their adversaries.
Prominent among Republican sen-
ators re-elected were Senators Pen-
rose of Pennsylvania, Brandgee of
Connecticut and Smoot of Utah.
Among prominent Democratic sen-
ators re-elected were Underwood of
Alabama and Fletcher of Florida.
Early returns told of the election of
Inomas Watson, tormer popul_ __ __stvice-_

COX
arding
Ssured
d mid.
ere in

Thomas WVatson, former populist vice-
presidential candidate, f to succeed
Senator Smith of Georgia. In Illinois
Representative McKinley, Republican,
was chosen to succeed Senator, Sher-
man.
Re-election of several Republican
house veterans including Speaker Gil-
lete, former Speaker Cannon, Repre-
3entative Fordney of Michigan, Proter
of Pennsylvania, Kahn of .California,
was reported in early returns.
Cox Loses Iowa by 7 to 1 -
Des Moines, Ia.-Harding was lead-
ing Cox by nearly 7 to 1.. Harding
led by 247 out of 2,680.in Iowa at 11
p. m. The vote was Harding 61,-
'326; Cox 20,981.
(Continued on Page Six)
El ection F orices
One To ide Jiule
A certain Southerner best known
by his pronounced "Yais Suh" accent
will ride a mule up and down .State
street soon. He will .be accompanied,
by various placards and in -all prob-
ability a large crowd.
The "why" of all this is that a gen-
tleman by the name of James M. Cos
was recently defeated in his hopes for'
he presidency of the United States and
the aforesaid Southerner has agreed
to mourn his defeat by performing said
ride. Truly we sometimes allow our
feelings to carry us beyond the point
of reason, comnion sense and the
maintenance of our dignity.
Then, there is a certain Northerner
who will not ride a mule, neither will
he don his white flannels, dig out the
old panama and the sport coat and
wear them at the Chicago game next
week. Thus will the feminine popu-
lace fail to have the splendid oppor-
tunity to view the summeradornment
of the male of the species that they
might have had if the aforesaid Mr.
Cox had been elected to the presi-
dency.

H. Moore, Democratic candidate.
The Republican legislative
didates, Charles A. Sink for state
ator, and Joseph E. Warner for

can..
sen-
rep-

resentative, were across the line with
correspondingly large majorities. The
entire Republican county ticket plac-
ed as easily as the national leaders.
Returns were given out in the Court
house, but as early figures indicated
the landslide that was to follow, the
people- gathered there to hear the
results soon dispersed.
THE WEATHER
Fair and Colder Today

obtaining of the election returns, one Richard Raville for vice-president;
the property of the signal corps and Edward Davis and Frank Eaton for
the other of the University. secretary; and C. N. Clarke and Roger
Manwaring for treasurer.
WOMEN REFUSE TO FOLLOW George Bouchard and Turner
HUSBANDS' LEAD IN VOTING Rudesil are nominees for president
of the senior law class; 0. E. Mar-1
SIndependence of New Voters Shown tinek and F3. E. Page for vice-presi-
In Caurt Rousedent; Raymond Lewis and E. Zigler
for secretary; and Clarence Lott and
Gossip . P. Wolf for treasurer.

CLASS ELECTIONS

All class elections in the Law
school will be held from 9 to 12
o'clock Wednesday morning in
the corridors of the Law build-
ing.
Dental college class elections
will be run off from 10 to 12
o'clock Thursday morning in
corridors of the Dental building.
Class elections in the Med-
ical school will be conducted
Friday morning on the main
floor of the Medical building.

Several women, while anxiously
awaiting election returns at the county
Court house last night, were discuss-
ing how independent of their hus-
bands' opinions theye were in voting.
One woman was heard to say, "My
husband voted for Mr. Harding and for
the past few months has been trying
to persuade me to, but the more he
argued the more staunch a Democrat
I became, and I voted for Governor
COX."
When asked if they were as well
qualified for the franchise as their
husbands, they were of the unanimous
opinion that their qualifications were
better since they had so much more
time for studying political affairs.
These six women showed more en-
tliusiasm whenever returns were an-
nounced than did more than 200 men
who were in the court room.

GOVERNOR SLEEPER CALLS FOR
ARMISTICE CELEBRATIONS
A proclamation has just bean issued
by Gov. Albert P. Sleeper calling at-
tention to the fact that the Michigan
legislature passed an act in 1919 mak-
ing it the duty of school officers and
teachers to hold appropriate commem-
orative exercises .on Nov. 11 aeh year.
He requests that the people of the state
not only observe Armistice day in a
fitting manner, but also that the fol-
lowing Sunday be devoted to memorial
services for those men who gave up
their lives in the war.
'Ensian Staff Meets Today
The Michiganensian staff will mee'
in the Press building at 5 o'clock to-
day.

DAILY SUBSCRIPTIONS DUE
All Michigan Daily subserip-.
tions should now be paid. :Those
who are now getting The .Daily
who hove not paid the $3.50 rate
by Nov. 10, will be charged $4.00
for their subscriptions. Please
either mail checks to The Mich-
igan Daily office, Press building,
or call in person.

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