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October 31, 1920 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-31

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT IRE
SERV'ICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 24. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1920. PRICE FIVE CEN

POLITICAL RACES
CLOSE1 LEADERS,
WVAIT ON RESULTS

CONFIDENCE EXPRESSED
HEADS OF LOTH
PARTIES

BY

SOCIALISTS EXPECT TO
POLL A RECORD VOTE
Part Chairmen Expect Swelling of
Ballots Because of Women's
Votes
(By Associated Press)
New York, Oct. 30. - The presi-
dential campaign of 1920, waged prin-
cipally around the League of Na-
tions, formally closed tonight.
The leading figures on Republican
and Democratic tickets addressed au-
diences in the East and Middle West.
Tomorrow they will rest. Monday
will bring the last toot of cam-
paign oratory and the last flare of red
light.
Express Confidence
The closing of the 'campaign to-
night was maried, as every political
campaign is marked, with expressions
of confidence from rival headquar-
ters.
"The evidence of the overwhelm-
ing Republican victory hourly in-
creases," was the statement of Will
H. Hays, chairman of the Republican
national committee.
"It is now certain that the Repub-
licans will have a minimum total o
368 electoral votes. We will have a
greatly increased majority in the
house and a substantial majority in
the senate."
This fr6m George White, chaIrma.
of the Democratic national commit-
tee:
J'Cox and Roosevelt will win. They
wil have a party majority in the sen-
ate and. house."
Protest Vote
Socialist headquarters, while mak-
ink no claim of electoral votes, pre-
dicted that the party would poll th'
largest vote in its history - 3,000,
000, some leaders claim while assert-
ing that many of these ballots would
represent party converts. Socialist
advocates also prophecied would rep-
resent a protest vote against impris-
onment of "political prisoners" in-
cluding Eugene V. Debs, their own
presidential candidate, now in Atlan-
ta prison for violating the espionage
act.
All parties took into consideration
the swelling of the vote by the ap-
pearance of women casting their first
ballots for president.
KRESGE DENOUNCES FALSE
ANTI-PAROCHIAL STATEMENTS
Detroit, Oct. 30. - Sebastian S.
Kresge, of the Kresge stores, denounc-
ed the falsity of statements that are
being circulated concerning his at-
titude toward the anti-parochial
school amendment, in a letter to John
A. Russell, chairman of the executive
committee of the Educational Liberty
league.
In brief Mr. Kresge's letter states
that the anti-parochial school amend-
ment is un-American, and that he has
in no way supported it in the past
and will not do so in the future.
American Boat Wins Race
Halifax, N. S., Oct. 30. - Esperan-
to, the American entry in the inter-
national fishermen's regatta, won the
first race here today, defeating the
Canadian entry, Delawanna, by about
20 minutes.
THE WEATHER
Little Change In Temperature

PURDUE HA1RRIFRS
DEFEAT MICHIGAN
(Special to The Daily)
Lafayette, Oct. 30.-Purdue univer-
ity cross country runners outclass-
d the Michigan hill and dale team
nd won easily here today, 38 to 17.
"urnas, of Purdue, Conference two
aile champion', won the race in easy
nanner, finishing well in the lead.
Freeborne of Michigan was the
irst Wolverine over the finish line,
>lacing in fourth position. Whitt-
nore, Penberthy, Standish, and Bran-
on were the last four men in. Mich-'
gan was outclassed from the start,
but the runners made a game finish,
and closed up the long gaps.
The men finished in the followving,
order. Furnas, (P); Harrison, (P);
McGruder, (P); Freeborne, (M); Lit-
Ile, (P); Dye, (P); Whittmore,
(M); Penberthy, (M); Standish,
(M); Brannon, (M). Time, 25 min-
ates, 34 seconds.
KOREE DATORsTO's
SPEAK IN AN ARoR

TAG DAY PLAN OF
YEARBOOK EDITORl

Managers Hope to Establish
Record on Campus This
Year

Dk.

Sales

0 . R. AVISON A LEADING
FIGURE IN CHRISTIAN
WORK OF EAST

APPEAL TO ENTIRE SCHOOL,
NOT TO SENIOR CLASS ALONE
Arrangements are being made for
the Michiganensian subscription cam-
paign which will this year take theE
form of Tag days. As an individual,
purchases the year book he will re-
ceive a yellow tag with a blue "M"
in the center. In this manner stu-
dents who have purchased the 'En-
sian will not be stopped by solicitors.
Will Appeal to School
It is hoped by the campaign man-
agersthat this year's sale of Mich-
iganensians will surpass all previous
records. They intend to make their
appeal to the entire student body in-
stead of to the senior class, which has
heretofore, born the brunt of making
the book a success.
"I consider it the patriotic duty of
every student enrolled in the Univer-
sity of Michigan to purchase the year
book of this, their University," said
Boyd Logan, '21, the executive chair-
man of the campaign. The program
is to start at 8 o'clock Monday, Nov.
1, and it will close at 5 o'clock Fri-
day.
Only Campaign
This will be the only appeal made
to the students in the form of a cam-
paign. "It is of course early to make
any prediction as to what the cam-
paign will bring forth, but with the
co-operation of the entire student
body, we, the directors of the 'En-
sian are looking to a record break-
ing year in sales as well as in the
book itself," said Logan. "The "tag-
ers" will be at their accustomed
places along the diagonal walk and
any one wishing to purchase a year
book will not have to go out of his
way to complete the transaction.
"It is the purpose of this campaign
to take part payment with orders, the
same system as was used so effective-
ly last year."
YESTERDAY'S GAMES

MATERIALS FOR
BLOCK M ARRIVE
With the shifting of the block "M"
from the north to the south stande
this year, more work in laying out the
huge letter has been necessitated due
to the fact that new plans and blue
prints must be made of its alterea
location. This is done in order that
the athletic office may know exactly
what seatsto reserve for the cheer-
ing section of the "M"
The work of drawing up the new
plans and laying out the flags has
ben undertaken by Sphinx and Trian-
gles, under the supervision of William
Henderson, '22, and is well under
way, according to latest reports. The
athletic office announced yesterday
that more than 2,000 flags which were
ordered have arrived.
The "M" is to be of larger dimen-
sions this year since the more gradual
sloping angle of the south stands de-
mands a bigger letter to get the right.
perspective from the north stands.
UNDERCLASS CONDUCT
COMMITTEE TO MEET
MEETING TUESDAY AT UNION TO
ORGANIZE SOPHOMORE
CLASS
R. J. Dunne, '22, chairman of the
Student council committee on under-
class conduct will meet the follow-
ing members of the sophomore class,
Tuesday, Nov. 2, at 7:15 o'clock at
the Union: Engineers--Paul Goebel,
Franklin Cappon, Edward Johns,
Richard Rowland, Leland Killpatrick,
Charles McEllven, George Tramp,
Robert Cooper, Rex Reason, Humphrey
Rhones, Horace Wachter.
Lits-George Planck, Ellis Hunt,
Herbert Dunphy, David Paper, Wil-
liam VanOrden, Carl Smith, Grenville
Andrews, Victor Method, John Sutton,
Theodore Banks, Hamilton Cochran,
William Christie, William Stirling,
Coolidge Kries, Benjamin Burbridge,
Thorne Brown, Arthur Redner, Rob-
ert Whitlock:
Dents-Henry Anderson and Oscar
Anderson. Pharmics-John Searle.
All of the above are urged to attend
this meeting, room 323 of the Union,
as important matters are to be dis-
cussed.
AKISON APIOINTED
CHIMES BSNESS HA

DR. O. R. Avison, a leading figure
n educational and medical work in
Korea, will deliver a number of ad-
jresses while in Ann Arbor over
Sunday and the first of the week.
He will talk on "Modern Christian
Thinking in Korea" at 12 o'clock to-
Say before the Congregational Open
Forum and will tell the story of med-
cal work in Korea at 7:30 o'clock
tonight at a union service in the
'resbyterian church.
Speaking Monday in Detroit before
the Wayne County Medical associa-
tion Dr. Avison, will then return to
:his city to address the Nurses
raining school at 7 o'clock Tues-
lay night and the Wasntenaw Medi-
┬░al society at 8 o'clock the same even-
ng.as
Dr. Avison has been recognized as]
,he leading advocate and exponent of
anion Christian work in the Orient.
s founder and head of the Sever-
-nce hospital at Seoul and as pres-
'dent of the Union Medical college,
and Union Christian college of Korea,
lie has had a varied and interesting
experience.
Prof. W. Carl Rufus of the Astron-
,my department, who was associated
with Dr. Avison in various forms of
ervice in Korea, will be the visitor's
host.

LONG RUNS AND PASSES BY VARSITY
WiIN SLOIPI GAME FROM TULANE, 2I-Q0
PERRIN AND_ GOETZ MICHIG1AN STARS.

TIME GOES BACK
Official University time was
set back one hour this morning
and will be the same asrCentral
Standard time, until further no- )
tice.
HFOR NATION LEAGU
Great Step in Preservation of Ideals
Fought for by
America
EIGHT LEADING PROFESSORS
ARE FAVORABLE TO UNION
The, League'of< Nations embodies
all the ideals that America has stood
for since the landing of the Pil-
grims in New England. It is the
mere beginning 'of an international
government, . a government which
will make American democracy safe
for the world. The assembling of the
league at Geneva at the 300th anni-
versary of the landing of the Pil-
grims is one more forward step in
co-operation for preservation of
American ideals. Today America
stands at the parting of the ways. To
enter the League of Nations , will
mean that she has accepted the lead-
ership the nations of the world are
offering her.
Such is the consensus of opinons
on the League of Nations expressed
by professors of History in eight lead-
ing colleges and universities of the
United States. While each empha-
size different features of the league
all agree "that the league is ground-
ed in our .whole national experi-
ence" and that "it is the goal toward
which American idealism has been
leading since the Republic was
founded."
The historians who share in the
opinon that America should support
the League of Nations are: Prof. P
L. Paxton, University of Wisconsin;
Prof. F. H. Hodder, University of
Kansas; Prof. J. A. Woo.dburn, In-
diana university; Prof.. A. C. Mc-
Laughlin, University of Chicago:
Prof. H. D. Foster, Dartmouth col-
lege;, Prof. U. B. Phillips, University
of Michigan; Prof. J. S. Bassett
Smith college; and Prof. W. A. Dun-,
ning, Columbia.'
J APANESE' EDUCATOR
VISITS MTICHIGAN
Dr.. Ryusei Watanabe, ex-'89, one of
Japan's foremost educators, spent
yesterday in Ann Arbor en route tc
Cornell, and other eastern universi-
ties. Dr. Watanabe, director of the
Otaru College of Commerce, Hokkaid
Japan, is touring the United States
England, Germany and France as an
investigator of vocational education
"I think you in America can boast
the most wonderful buildings and
equipment of any universities in th
world," said Dr. Watanabe. "In Ja-
pan our accommodations are inade-
quate. Out of 1,000 applicants for
entrance at Otaru, we can take only
the 160 who pass the highest exam-
ination. We get -quality but no quan-
titly. As we get more buildings we
will be able to take more students."
One feature of Japanese colleges is
the number of foreign instructors
chiefly in the language departments.
Most of their professors have been
educated abroad as well as in Japan.

SOUTHERNERS RUN VARSITY
ENDS EFFECTIVELY;
LINE HOLDS
SCHULTZ CHEERED.BY
AUDIENCE IN STANDS
Wolverines Twice on Tulane One Foot
Line at Close of
P'eriods
Michigan's Varsity won a slow con-
test from Tulane, 21 to 0, yesterday
afternoon on Ferry field. Although
the southerners put up a game fight
they were unable to cope with the
heavier Michigan line.
The play of the Michigan team in
the first half was mediocre, little fight
being displayed. Steketee was the
most consistent ground gainer, with
Usher taking second honors. Banks
scored the first touchdown in the
second quarter on a line plunge aft-
er the ball had been brought down
the field by steady rushes. Steketee
kicked goal.
Second Half Faster
In the second half things went bet.
ter, although the play of the Varsity
left much to be desired. Jack Dunn
Perrin and Paper replaced. Banks,
Usher and Steketee at the opening. bt
the half. The feature of - the game
came in the third quarter when Jacl
Perrin broke away for a 48 yard run.
and a touchdown. Goebel kicked the
goal.
Another spectacular play came in
the fourth quarter, when Banks toss-
ed a long pass to Perrin, who ran to
the Tulane 1-yard line and went over
on the next play. Michigan was or
the point of scoring again when the
final whistle was blown. As a mat-
ter of fact, the ball was inside the
Tulane 1-yard line both when the first
half ended and - at the close of the
same. "

Indiana 10, Northwestern 7.
Illinois 17, Minnesota 7.
Ohio State 7, Chicago 6.
Harvard 24, Virginia 0.
Georgia Tech 17, Centre 0.
Detroit 39, Fordham 0.
Notre Dame 27, Army 17.
Yale 21, Colgate 7.
Penn State 28, Penn 7.
Lafayette 29, Pittsburgh 14.
Columbia 20, Williams 14.

Pass Defense..Good
.Of, the linemen Captain Goe
Duke Dunne, and Johns showed to t
hest advantage. The l1chigan' Ce
tarn was a stumbling block in t
oath of the opposing backs almo
every time the play' was aimed at h
side of the line.
The Wolverines demonstrafed ' t
they have developed -a good defer
for the forward pass.' Paper, 'gear
Perrin, and Banks either blocked4
Intercepted at least eight Tula
heaves. "'The ability which the subs
tutes showed in the. last quarter
an encouraging sign. 'The elev(
seemed to be almost 'as 'strong 4
the second string men playing.as w:
'he r lao1.r' a

DISAPPROVAL OF FIRSTI
OF GARGOYLE IS EX-
PRESSED
C. Maurice Atkinson, '22, wa

ISSUE

51w ter To Supplement Stagecraf t
Course With Stage Dancing Class

as ap-

To supplement his course in stage-
;raft, and to teach students the tech-
iique of stage dancing and deport-
nent, E. Mortimer Shuter, director of!
he Michigan Union opera, will open
. class in stage dancing next week.
Although the course is given upon
Vlr. Shuter's own initiative, it is giv-
en especially to prepare fresh'nen
-nd sophomores for trying-out for the
)pera. Enrollment will be open all
3f this week, and those who intend to
take the course are asked to see him
at once at his office in room 308 of
the Union. The course will open next
week, and will be devoted entirely to
dancing.
The stagecraft course given by Mr.
Shuter, was begun last week with 17
students enrolling for the work. As
there were a number who wished to
attend the Traditions' day meeting, the
first lecture will be repeated this week
in order that others who intend to
take the course will not miss any of
the work. The stagecraft course gives.

DAILY SUBSCRIPTIONS
Daily subscribers who wish to
pay their subscriptions may
either send checks, or pay same
at The Daily office. The $4.00
rate will be charged on all un-
paid subscriptions after Nov. 10.
the mechanism of playwriting, and
practical hints and analysis of play
construction, customs,. terms and con-
ditions in a theater. Literary plays
and literature of the drama are not
taken' up.
The purpose of the stagecraft course
as well as the stage dancing course, is
primarily to help the Union opera,
but is also intended to give the stu-
dents a foundation upon which to
build in case a professional career in
this kind of work is chosen after
graduation from the University.

pointed business manager of Chimes
at a meeting of the Board in Control
of Student publications Saturday
morning.
The Board also went on record as
disapproving of the first issue of the
Gargoyle and authorized the Board
chairman to consult with the manag-
ing editor of that magazine to take
adequate measures for proper super-
vision of the reading matter in the
future.
SPECIAL WIRELESS SERVICE
TO HANDLE ELECTION RESULTS
Special Associated Press service
and two wireless stations will co-
operate in giving The Daily the lat-
est authentic election returns. The
presses will be held up until 3 or 4
o'clock Wednesday morning, and
while no Extra will be published, the
morning edition will be largely de-
voted to election news.
The Signal Corps of the R. O. T. C.
has agreed to furnish the operators
and equipment by which wireless 're-
turns from all parts of the country
will be received.

Salutes President Burton
An interesting 'in cideht was. Cag
tain Goetz' salute to President Bur
ton before the opening of they game
The Michigan captain plans to sa-
lute the president at'the had of 'ti
whole team before the'Chicago game
Germany Schultz, former star Mich
igan eenter. and, director of athletic,
at Tulane, was.-given several cheerf
in the course of the game, one o
which he acknowledged by bowing ti
the stands.
(Continued on page Six)
FORESTRY CLUB HOLDS FIRST
CAMPFIRE TUESDAY EVENING
The first camp fire of the Forestry
club will be held at 6 o'clock Tuesday
evening at the forestry farm.
It is especially urged by those .ii
charge that freshmen of the forestr:
department attend this initial caml
fire. Prof. Filbert Roth and othe
members of the faculty will make in
formal talks.
Full details of the trip will be fount
on the bulletin board in the forestr;
seminar.

1921

MICHGANENSIAN

1921

OPPORTUNITY is offered every student to reserve his copy during the subscription campaign this week. Therewill be
no extra copies ordered this year. The 1921 Michiganensian will be the most complete and elaborate yearbook ever published
The more books sold the better the book will be. Every student should have a Michiganensian for every year he's here.
Your only chance to get a book is this week. Cash$5.50 or $3.50 down and $2.50 upon receipt of copy.
5,000 - FIVE THOUSAND COPIES AR NEEDED 5,000

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