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October 30, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-30

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WEATHER

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FAIR AND SLIGHTLY
WTARMER TODATY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AMlD NIGHT 'WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 23. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1920. PRICE FIVE Ci

t i

COLUMBUS SPEC1AL
TICKETS WILL GO
ON SALE MONDAY

SPOTLIGHT COMMITTEE IN SEARCH

OF ACTORS

FOR VAUD VLLE DEC.

1i

SALE TO BE HELD
LOBBY; WILL LAST
WEDNESDAY

IN UNION
UNTIL
E SELLS
SEATS

ATHLETIC
0. S., U.

OFFICE
GAME

Baud Will Make Trip in Union Train;
Coach Reserved for
Women
Tickets for the trip to the Ohio
State game will be on sale Monday,
Tuesday, and Wednesday of next
wkeek at the counter in the lobby of
the Union. The sale will be held
from '10 to 12 o'clock and from 3 to
5 o'clock on those days. The Ath-
letic office in the Press buildjng is
selling the seat reservations for the
game.
No Limit on Number Cars
Arrangements have been made to
accommodate all students who sign
up for the trip and as many cars as
are needed will be provided.
The band will make the trip on the
special, which will leave Ann Arbor
at 7 o'clock In the morning of Nov.
6. The train will arrive in Colum-
bus at 12.30 o'clock, and start the re-
turn journey at 9 o'clock in the even
ing, arriving here at 2 o'clock Sun-
day morning.'
Provide for Women
Tickets for women will be placed
on sale in Dean Myra B. Jordan's of-
fice. If sufficient women sign up for
the trip it is planned to have a special
coach for them and to provide suit-
abl chaperons.
The cost of the round trip tickets
is $13.50. These tickets will be good
for 30 days, but not many stopovers
are expected, due to the poor rail-
road connections between Columbus,
Toledo, and Ann Arbor on Sunday.
Here's Where We
aheat Daddy Time
There is somewhat of a surprise
awaiting Father Time Sunday morn-
ing, although most of us won't be up
early enough to smile. at the old gent
tleman's discomfiture in the sudden
upsetting of his regular schedule.
Beginning at 2 o'clock that morn-
ing, tempus will cease to fugit - or
whatever it is the wise ones say -
for just 60 minutes. The cause is
found in the announcement that at
this time University clocks will be
set back one hour to conform with
central standard time, the present
"railroad" time.
It is recorded that Joshua once
threw a crowbar into the temporal
cog -wheels and made the sun stand
still until the team he was betting on
could bring in another home run.
Now it is the moon that will have
to do the hesitation.
For the benefit of those students
of more conscientious disposition, it
may be remarked that it will not be
necessary to get up at 2 o'clock to
turn the Ingersoll or Elgin back. But
it will be best just before retiring
Saturday night to whisper to Big Ben
what is going to happen so that the
peaceful atmosphere of the Sabbath
morn may not be punctured by the1
profanity of profound slumberers pre-
maturely awakened.
SENIOR LITERARY FOOTBALL
PLAYERS TO PRACTICE TODAY
All tryouts for the senior lit. class
football team are requested by Man-
ager Lowell Genebach to report to
him on South Ferry field this morn-
ing at 9:30 o'clock. Men in the class
who can play football should appear
for drill, as the class series starts
soon, and practice is already delayed
several weeks.
DAILY SUBSCRIPTIONS

Daily subscrib'ers who wish to
pay their subscriptions may
either send checks, or pay same
at The Daily office. The $4.00
rate will be charged on all un-
paid subscriptions after Nov. 10.

Shuter to ick Applicants Next Week
for Annual Union Show
Preparations for the annual Union
Spotlight vaudeville, which has been
set for Dec. 1, were started yesterday
when the recently appointed commit-
tee issued its call forbtryouts. Morti-
mer E. Shuter will be in his office
Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday,
of next week, between 3 and 4:30
o'clock at the Union to consider the
applications of the stunt artists.
Special stress is laid upon the ne-
cessity of finding some good comedy
acts, as a large degree of the success
of the show depends upon them, ac-
cording to the committee in charge.
The best acts of the vaudeville will
be used in conjunction with the Glee
club minstrel performance, together
with the star stunts of the Band
Bounce.
The committee announced by the
Union is as follows: Pierce McLouth,
'21E, chairman; W. W. Michaels, '22,
in charge of ticket sales;. Mark B.
Covell, '21E, in charge of programs
and advertising; and Stuart B. Smith,
'21E, stage manager.
ELECT jOFFICER'S

THE LINEUPS
Michigan Position . Tulane
Cappon ...... L.E....... Wigand
Goetz (Capt.).. L.T......Payne
Dunne......L.G........ Fiptz
Vick........C.......... Reed
Petro........R.G......Killinger
Johns.......R.T..... Beallieu
Goebel.......R.E..Wight (Capt.)
Banks ........Q...... Richeson
Usher........L.H........ Nagle
Steketee .....R.H......Dwyer
Nelson ......F.B... . .. McGraw

O

W. Rush Picked as President of
Junior Lits; Dow Heads Junior

Engineers
JOHNSTON CHOSEN PRESIDENT
OF SENIOR ENGINEER CLASS
Clarence Johnston was chosen presi-
dent of the senior engineering class
in the elections held yesterday morn-
ing. Murray Van Wagoner was elect-
ed vice-president; W. R. Harrison,
secretary; James Barger, treasurer,
and A. R. Reynolds, football manager.
The junior literary class selected O.
W. Rush as president, Margaret Stone,
vice-president; Brewster Campbell,.
secretary, and F. W. Smith, treasurer.
The election held by the freshman
literary class resulted in the selection
of Donald Steketee as president. Oth-
er officers who were chosen are: Mary
Hayes, vice-president; Dorothy Rock-
well, secretary; and Robert Wilkins,
treasurer.
Freshman engineers held their
elections yesterday afternoon and se-
'ected John Bernard for president;
John Sutter, vice-president; Henry
Slaughter, secretary; Robert Mitchell,
treasurer, and Cameron Ross, football
manager.
STREETCAR BADLY
HURTS TWO WOMEN
BULLETIN
Mrs. Robert W. Benz died at 10:45
o'clock last night without regaining
consciousness.
Mrs. Robert W. Benz, of 308 East
Jefferson street, wasrun down by a
street car about ,8 o'clock last night
while crossing the track at the corner
of State and Jefferson streets and in-
jured so badly that it was found ne-
cessary to amputate her left leg above
the knee.
She was taken to the Homoeopathic
hospital immediately after the accid-
ent and the report from there late
last night was that nothing definite
could be predicted about her recovery.
Mrs. Benz was accompanied by an-
other woman, Mrs. L. Lutz of 507
South Division street. She was also
injured but not so badly as Mrs. Benz.
This woman was taken away from the
scene of the accident in an automo-
bile.
The street car was driven by Harry
Jeffries.
Freshman Makes Startling Discovery
J. Algernon Frosh, '24E, drifted in-
to The Daily office yesterday wanting
to know what all that "white stuff"
was in the air. The editor's face, aft-
er registering an expression of utter
darkness, gradually burst into an au-
rora borealis of light.
"Why, that's snow!" he explained.
The light of truth slowly filtered
through the Frosh-befogged brain.
"We used to call it that in Grand
Rapids," he faltered; whereupon J.
Algernon "passed out cold."

ART EXHIBITION TO
START WEDNESDAY
Forty large Woodbury canvasses
and numerous smaller ones will be
put on exhibition at Memorial hall,
beginning next Wednesday evening.
Woodbury is reputed to be one of the
three greatest Amerjcan marine
painters, according to local art en-
thusiasts, and they expect his sea-
scapes to prove popular in art cir-
cles. .
The exhibit, which is to last until
Nov. 30, will be marked by a series
of explanatory talks by members of
the Fine Arts department and of the
architectural faculty. Prof. Herbert
R. Cross, of the former, will lecture
next Monday, while every Sunday aft-
ernoon, and once during each week,
there will be a gallery talk.
The exhibition has been brought to
Ann Arbor through the efforts of the
Ann Arbor Art association. It would
not have been possible to get the pic-
tures were it not for the fire proof
exhibition room in Memorial hall.
IDEAL CODE WILL BE'
GOAL OF GUILD FORU
Recognizing the need of a definite
and modern code of ethics, the Uni-
tarian Guild forum has arranged a
program for the year of a series of
discussions on religious problems and
the 10 commandments in modern life.
The series will start at 6:30 o'clock
next Sunday evening, when' the first
commandment will be discussed in
connection with primitive religion
and niodern gods, such as money and
success.
The historical and critical back-
ground of the commandments will be
presented by the minster, Dr. Sydney
S. Robbins. Meetings will be open at
all times to free discussions and ex-
pressions of opinions.
The culminating point of the year's
work will be reached when every
person in the oragnization will be
asked to formulate a code of ethics
which he considers adaptable to mod-
ern needs. From these the ideal code
will be chosen and made public.
PROWLER ENTERS FRATERNITY
HOUSES THURSDAY NIGHT
Two fraternity houses were entered
and ransacked late Thursday night by
a thief. At the Chi Psi house, 620
South State street, $60 was reported
to have been stolen.
The prowler was seen in the parlor
of tht Psi Upsilon house, 702 South
University avenue, but escaped be-
fore his identity could be learned. No
theft was reported.
The man is believed to have en-
tered both houses by thehfronthdoor.
Police ofticials believe that the job
was done by a student,
Block "M" Plans Under Way
Preparations for the formation' of
the block "M" at the Chicago game
are now being made under the direc-
tion of the athletic office, the actual
work of drawing up the "M" being in
the hands of William P. Hender-
son, '22.
According to P. G. Bartelme, ath-
letic director, the "M" this year will
be displayed in the south stand in-
stead of in the north as heretofore,
and will require some 2,800 to 3,000
people for its formation. Full de-
tails and directions for the persos
who will compose the "M" regarding

the method of handling its display
will not be given out, however, until
a few days preceding the Chicago
game.

TULA9NE HERE WIH
Michigan to Present Strong Front in
First Southern Game
Since 1914
VISITORS HAVE WINS OVER
GEORGIA TECH TO CREDIT
For the first time in six years, the
Wolverines will engage in a gridiron
contest with a team from below the
Mason Dixon line when they mneet
Tulane this afternoon. The last game
with a souther team was in 1914
when Michigan downed Vanderbilt 23
to 3.
Those who look for an easy victory
for the Varsity this afternoon are apt
to be disagreeably surprised accord-
ing to the best information available.
The New Orleans school has always
been well represented on the ' grid-
iron in the last few years and has
scored victories over Georgia Tech.
whose football prowess is well known
in the north.
The Idea seems to be prevalent on
the campus that Tulane is a small
and rather unimportant school. Quite
the reverse is the case, however, as
the New Orleans institution is con-
sidered one of the best universities in
the south.
So far this esason the visitors have
been remarkably successful. Their
most noteworthy performance so far
was the overwhelming defeat of the
University of Mississippi last week.
Coach Shaugnessey and Germany
Schultz, the former Michigan star,
are accompanying the team. The lat-
ter is director of atheltics at Tu-
lane. He was picked by Yost as cen-
ter on his all-time Michigan eleven
as well as being picked for All-Amer-
ican when he was in school.
Michigan does not regard the con-
test this afternoon as one of vital im-
portance, since its outcome will not
influence her standing in the Confer-
ence. This does not mean, however,
that the Wolveriens are not going to
make every effort to win. The line-
up which will oppose the southerners
is the strongest that can be mustered
at the present time with the possi-
ble exception of the 'quarterback po-
sition.
DEADLINE PLACEDON
PICTURESFORESIAN
Organization pictures to appear in
the 1921 Michiganensian must be
taken before Nov. 15, and individual
pictures before the last of January,
according to Willis Blakeslee, '21L,
managing editor.
Arrangements have been made with
various studios in the city for the
handilng of pictures of seniors; or-
ganizations and fraternities. The fol-
lowing photographers have been se-
cured for this work: Rentscheler's
studio, 319 East Huron, phone, 961-M;
Randall studio, 921 East Washington,
phone, 598; H. L. Spedding, 619 East
Liberty, phone, 948-W; Derr studio,
721 North University, phone, 296-J;
and Corbett and Hamilton studio, 336
South State, phone, 303-W.
It is urged by the Michiganensian
staff that sittings be made in time so
that the book will not be delayed be-
cause of cuts. And it is further ad-
vised that arrangements .for sittings

be made at once, in order to facilitate
the schedule of the studio so that no
pictures will have to be taken after
the middle of next month, at which
time photographers are rushed with
Christmas orders. All organizations
are requested to sign contracts at the
annual's office at once.
The individual pictures of the se-
nior section will be made for $3; two-
thirds of this going to the photog-
rapher and the remainder to the year-
bood to pay for engraving. When
portraits are desired from the Mich-
iganensian sittings no charge will be
made for the extra print and the
original $2 paid to the photographer
may be applied to dozen or half doz-
en orders.
Tap Room Scene of Singing
Last night was music night in the
tap room of the Union. Quite a num-
ber of students, with the cares of study
forgotten for the evening, gave vent
to their feelings by launching into the
singing of the old Michigan songs.

HOLD SERVICES FOR
PROFESSOR ALLEN
Funeral services for Prof. John R.,
Allen, formerly the head of the me-
chanical engineering department here,'
who died Tuesday night in Pittsburg,
Pa., were held at 2:30 o'clock yester-
day afternoon at the Baptist church.
Rev. J. M. Wells of the Baptist church
officiated.
Professor Allen's death followed a
sickness of less than two weeks. On
Oct. 16 he was in Detroit to address
a meeting of engineers, and at that
time he contracted a bad cold. The
next day he returned to Pittsburg,
where he spent the day in bed to re-
cuperate for a trip to Philadelphia,
where he was scheduled to speak be-
fore a gathering of engineers.
From Philadelphia, Professor Al-
len went to New York to attend a
consultation on the vehicular tunnel
which, it is planned, will be built un-
der the Hudson.,
That night he returned to Pitts-
burg, where he filled a speaking en-
gagement in spite of his weakened
condition. He died the following
Wednesday. ,
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley of the en-'
gineering college has received many
telegrams . from various engineering
societies throughout the country ex-
pressing the high regard in which
Professor Allen} was held.
OPERA SEXTETTE,
OPENSCONCERTS
Tremendous Applause Accorded Each
Number of Metropolitan
Singers,
MARTINELLI AND NINA x
MORGANA WIN OVATIONS

I - - 1

The splendid ovation afforded each
member of the Metropolitan Opera
Sextette upon his or hpr appearance
and the tremendous applause that
followed the completion of each
number was sufficient guarantee of
the complete success of the initial
concert of the Choral Union sefies
last night in Hill auditorium.
The jocund Martinelli, who is fast
gaining on Caruso's laurels, led 4is
sextette in a repertory of arias and
ensembles that will be the subject of
comment in Ann Arbor for some
time to come. His voice of golden
timbre lends itself admirably well to
solo and ensemble presentation.. He
was forced to take the only encore
of the evening when, with real bril-
liance heysang "Celeste Aida."
To Nina Morgana went a big share
of the favor of the audience. The
grace she dismlayed .in singing the
difficult cadenzas in the Musetta
waltz fairly brought the audience to
their feet.
The program was divided into two
parts, the first being given over to se-
lections from the works of Puccini,
while extractions from Verdi's operas
constituted the second.
LABOR LEADERS AND FA11MERS
CONFER ON CREDIT QUESTION
u Washington, Oct. 29. - Labor lead-
ers participated with representatives
of farmers from all the eountry to-
day in conference to devise ways and
means of obtaining credits "for the
orderly tmarketing of arm products."
Hughie Jennings Signs with Giants
New York, Oct. 29. - Hugh Jenn-
ings, who for many years was mana-
ger of the Detroit American team,
.signed a contract here today as as-
sistant manager of the New York
National Baseball club, it was an-
nounced today by John J. McGraw.

UNITED STATES (kFFERED BAS]
FOR OPENING 01?-
RELATIONS
EXPRESSES ATTITUDE
F ROM MEXICAN LETTE]
Secretary Believes He Is Warrant
In Saying Situation Wil Cease
as Question
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 29. -- Secreta
of State Colby Intimated today, thi
recognition of the Mexican gover,
ment was near. The secretary we
commenting on a letter of Robtr
Pesqueira, Mexican high commissiol
er to Washington. The letter he si
"off ers a basis upon which the pre
liminiries of recognition can con
dently proceed."
Sets Forth Mexican Attitude
Pesqueira's letter sets forth the p
sition of his government at this tin
and declared that the United Stat
"must see iito the new Mexico th
faces the world In pride and col
dence."
Mr. Colby in a formal stateme:
said he thought he was warranted I
saying that the Mexican question wi
soon cease to be a question at all, -1i
asmuch as it is about to be answe
ed, not only as it concerns the Unite
States, but indeed the whole wor i
well.,
No Intimation of Reeogniton
Prior .to ; Secretary Colby's a
nouncement there had, been no tin
matron at the 'state department th
early recognition -was a possibilit:
Officials had repeatedly intimated th
'it would be necessary for the Mel
can government to show by its sc
that it was prepared to give foreig1
ers and Americans in Mexicd pa
ticularly th 'rtcio rm t
ference to which the United t to
has contended they were entitled u
der international law.
Oldest Employec
' Hates Sickbec
Michael Condon, oldest Universi
employe, who recently suffered an, a
tack of heart failure, is in a critic'
condition, according to the attendir
physician. He is delirious and wan
to "get back with the boys."
Condon, who is 78 years' .cld, h
been in the service of the Universi
for over 50 years, summer and wi
ter. Starting during the presiden<
of Dr. Henry P. Tappan as an e
rand boy, Condon has worked he
under all the University president
including President Burton. -
"Old Mike," as he has been kno*
on the campus, has long been a sti
dent favorite. On several occasio
his expenses have been paid that b
might attend alumni banquets in D
troit and New York. r
Condon, who is a bachelor, has ti
nephews who were Michigan me
They are- George Hayler, '94E, who
with the eImpire Electrical compar
of New York, and Henry Hayler, '9
manager of the Peninsular Sta
bank of Detroit. , Mrs. Mary A. Ha

ler, of Ann Arbor, Condon's sister,
living with him during his illness.
BELGIAN PROFESSORS EXAMINE
MEDICAL SCHOOL MONDA
Coming from- the University -
Brussels, Professors De Page, Bo
det, Sand, and Dustin will arrive ne:
Monday morning.in Ann Arbor for ti
purpose of getting points that will b
of value to them in the reorgaiz
tion of th'eir medical school.
They are accompanjed in this cou:
try by Dr. Robinson of the Rock
feller foundatiolp. The professors a
visiting the different schools in th
country which -they think will co:
tribute the best features.
During their stay in Ann Arbc
they will stop at the Union, and w
leave this city Tuesday afternoc
The medical faculty will have a me
ing before their arrival to plan e
tertainment for the visitors.

- I

No details of the
en out.

contract were giv-

NacSwiney's Body Arrives at Cork
Cork, Oct. 29.-The body of Ter-
ence. MacSwiney arrived here on
board an American tug at 4 o'clock
this afternoon. The tug, whose flag
was flown at half mast, docked at
Custom House quay. An enormous
crowd lined the opposite quays and
the nearby bridges.
Dixie Club Honors Southern Team
In honor of the Tulane team the
Dixie club held an informal party in
Barbour gymnasium last night. About
40 couples attended the dance at which
Mr. and Mrs. Gilland, Dr. W. E. For-
sythe and Mrs. Forsythe chaperoned.

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