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October 28, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-28

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FHE WEATHER
FAIR AND COOL
TODAY

I

ra

tlx

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY ANtD NIGHT WIRlE
SERVICE

.

VOL. XXXI. No. 21.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1920.

PRICE FIVE C

PROF. 1. R. AEN
DIES OF PNEUMONIA
3IN PITTSBURG, PAffi
WAS FORMER HEAD OF UNIVERSI-
TY'S MECHANICAL ENGIN-
EERING DEPARTMENT
HIS DEATH COMES AS
SHOCK TO ASSOCIATES
Professor Allen with University for
Years; Went from Here to
Minnesota
The death of Prof. John R. Allen,
former head of the U. of M. mechan-
ical engineering department, who died
suddenly of pneumonia Tuesday even-
Ing in Pittsburg, Pa., was a shock to
all his associates in Ann Arbor, no
one even knowing before his death
that he had been seriously ill.
Up until three years ago when he
left the University of Michigan to go
to the University of Minnesota as
dean of the engineering college, Pro-
fessor Allen was for years associate
head of the mechanical engineering
department of Michigan. He was a
recognized authority on 'heating and
ventilating engineering, and at one
time was the president of the National
Society of Heating and Ventilating
Engineers. Also, he has been vice-
president of the American Society of
Mechanical Engineers.
Went to Minnesota
Last spring Professor Allen left
Minnesota to take the directorship of
important research work for the Na-
tional Society of Heating and Venti-
lating Engineers, in which he had the
co-operation of the government, and
conducted his research and establish-
ed his laboratory in the U. S. bureau
of mines laboratory at Pittsburg.
Professor Allen's one great grief in
life came with the entrance of the
United States into the war in which
he could take no active part. In the
spring of 1916 he suffered an acci-
dent which cost him the sight of one
eke, and he was therefore unfit for
military servicer
x In Foreign Work
In 1911 Professor Allen was called
to Turkey to build up an engineering
department in Robert college. He
was made dean of that department,
and stayed there till it got upon its
feet. During his sojourn in Turkey
he was on leave of absence from the
University of Michigan.
Two years before that he headed.
an expedition into Mexico, where he
'pnt as a representative of one of the
leading rubber companies of this
country, to investigate the peculiar
trees of Mexico which prdmised, a sub-
stittite for rubber.
Professor Allen is survived by his
widow and one "daughter. The body
will be brought here for burial. Fu-
neral services will be held at 2:30
o'clock Friday, in the Baptist church,
the Rev. J. M. Wells officiating.
TEN BASS TRYOUTS TO BE
CHOSEN BY CLUB TONIGHT
Ten first basses will be chosen
froih the following list for the Glee
club. All the men listed are request-
ed to report at 7 o'clock tonight in
the Union reading room: H. 3. Low-
ry, 20E, Lucian Lare, '23, L. E.
Mack, '23E, F. G. Davis, '21, C. L.
Mills, '23, H. S. Morgan, '23, Dudley
Newton, '22E, M. L. Richards, '23,

E. F. Perkins. '21, P. J. Beatty, '22E,
Leo 'Rennell, '22, Phillips, Elloitt, '23,
E. C. McCobb, '23, E. B. Potter, '23,
R. H: Rowland, '23E, Almond Fair
field, '23, F. S. Roser, '21E, K. S. An-
derson, '23E

TICKET REQUESTS
MUST BE IN TODAY
All applications for student tickets
to the Chicago game must be received
at the Athletic association" office not
later than tonight, according to a
statement issued by Hrry Tillotson,
assistant athletic director, yesterday.
Mail orders received after last night
from persons not students will not be
filled and every available seat except
those saved for the use of the student
body was expected to be sold by last
night.
"We will do our best to fill every
student order received today," said
Mr. Tillotson, "but so great is the de-.
mand for seats that it may become
necessary for us to cut down on ord-
ers for extra seats that are receiyed
late."
Mr. Tillotson is acting director of
athletics in the absence of Philip G.
Bartelme, who left for Chicago yes-
terday on personal business. Mr. Bar-
telme will return some time today or
tomorrow.
PRESIDENT BURTON WILL
OPEN STATECONVENTION
PROGRAM INCLUDES REGISTRAR
HALL, PROFESSOR WHITNEY
AND OTHERS
With an address on "Being Alive,",J
President Marion L. Burton will open
the 67th annual convention of the
Michigan's State Teachers' associa-
tion at 1:30 o'clock this afternoon in
the coliseum at Grand Rapids. At
2:30 o'clock he will discuss "The Aim
of American Education" before a sec-
tional meeting in the armory.U
President Burton and the Univer-
sity professors at the convention are
to attend a Michigan alumni dinner
at 6 o'clock in the First Methodist
church.-
Appearing on the three days' pro-
gram are addresses by several Michi-
gan professors. Registrar A. G. Hall
at 9 o'clock Friday morning will dis-
cuss the question of whether our
high school graduates are as success-
ful in cllege work or the work of
business life as we have reason to
expect. He will point out their com-,
mon defects, and how these defects
may be remedied.
Other addresses by University pro-
fessors for Friday morning are:
"The Group Test as an Aid in Edu-
cation," by Prof. Guy M. Whipple,
"Vocational Education for Girls and
Women in Michigan," by Miss Cleo
Murtland, associate professor of in-
dustrial education, "Developing Qual-
ities of Citizenship," by Prof. C. 0.
Davis, and "Educational Research
from the University Centers," by
Prof. A. S. Whitney, head of the de-
partment of education.
At 2 o'clock Friday afternoon Prof.
George E. Myers will consider the
James law. Prof. Charles P. Wagner
will deal with the direct method as
being out of place in the two year
high school course. "Problems of the
Small School" is the subject of the
address by Prof. J. B. Edmonson for
the same afternoon.
COMMITTEE MEETS TO ADJUST
ROOMING DIFFERENCES TODAY

FINISH UNION POOL
SWIMMERS' OBJECT

Coach Drulard's Men Turn Out
Back Membership Campaign
Committee

to

MEN PETITION ATHLETIC BOARD
FOR SUPPORT OF SWIMMING
"Finish the pool" was the slogan
adopted at the Union last night when
more thann40 men interested in the
development of the Michigan swim-
ming team turned out for the open-
ing meeting of the life membership
campaign which will take place on
Nov. 8, 9, and 10. The gathering,
which was largely impromptu, was in
charge of Coach Elmer Drulard, '20.
Coach Drulard opened the meeting
with a short talk on the prospects
of swimming at Michigan. He told of
the petition which is now in the
hands of the executive committee of
the Board in Control of Athletics for
consideration, stating that the peti-
tion asked for more support from the
Athletic association than has been
given in the past as well as request-
ing permission to arrange meets and
decreased rates at the local Y. M. C.
'A. He was followed on the program
by Minor Sports Manager Elliott, who
outlined plansfor the winter's swim-
ming program.,
Snel Speaks
Probably the most important talk
of the evening was given by L. W.i
Snell, '21, who is in charge of the new
campaign for life memberships. Snell
told of the hopes of Homer Heath, di-
rector of the Union, for the comple-
tion of the pool and 'asked the sup-
port of the swimming team in the
coming campaign, urging particular-
ly that they give it as much publicity
as lies in their power, both here and
at home.
Other speakers were Lyndon Bab-
cock, '22, one of the founders of
Michigan's first swimming team,
Warren Hyde, '23, star of last year's
crack freshman squad, Don Nixon,
'24, one of the best swimmers of the
'Detroit Athletic club, and Norton
Golasmith, '22L, diver on last year's
team, who is taking over the coaching
of the freshman aggregation. Gold-
smith spoke to the freshmen private-
ly after the Varsity candidates had
left.
Picture to Be Taken
This afternoon at 3 o'clock in Wat-
erman gymnasium pictures of all
swimming tryouts'- and last year's
men will be taken. Every man on the
campus who intends to become a can-
didate for swimming honors, either
Varsity or freshman, should be on
hand with a swimming suit. The pic-
tures taken will be used to stimulate
interest in the campaign.
.Coach Drulard will be at the, city
Y. M. C. A. every afternoon after 3
o'clock, with the exception of this aft-
ernoon when pictures will be taken,
Saturdays and Sundays. Men who are
free at that hour should avail them-
selves of the opportunity to get prac-
tice in before the regular call for
candidates is issued shortly after .the
close of the football season.

PRESS CLUB PLANS
,CONVENTION HERE
A convention ofhthe University
Press club of Michigan, which was
organized here last year when edi-
tors and other. men interested in the
editorial side of newspaper work met
to establish closer relations with the
University, will be held Nov. 11
and 12.
A constitution which has been
drawn up will be offered the club for
adoption. The purpose of a lasting
organization is to make 'available re-
sources of the University to editors
and to offer to the later institution a
channel for service through the news-
papers of the state.
The program for the convention
has not yet been entirly arranged,
but so far there has been a smoker
planned the night before the opening
of the conference, .and James Scher-
merhorn, who is on the editorial staff
of the Detroit Free Press, has been
obtained to speak on the first day of
the meeting.
FOUR CLASSES VOTE
FOR OFFICERS TOAY
Senior Lits, Junior Engineers, Soph
Lits and Engineers to Elect
Men
ENGINEERS TO VOTE IN ROOM
OVER ARCH, LITS IN UI-HALLL
Among the four class elections to be
held today is that of the senior liter-
ary class which will be held this
morning from 9 to 1 o'clock in Uni-
versity hall..
Following is a list of the nominees:
President, Albert C. Jacobs, Fred J.
Petty; vice-presdient, Dorothy Dodds,
Eleanor Stevenson, Aletha Yerkes;
secretary, atrina Schermerhorn, Jean
Wallace; treasurer, Dwight P. Joyce,
John McManis; football manager,
Fred Fletcher, Lowell Genebach.
The election of the soph lits will be
held in the same place from 2 to o
o'clock. Their nominees are: Pres-
ident, Vernon Hillery, George Planch;
vice-president, Helen Schermerhorn,
Helene Torry; secretary, Elaine Mc-
Elroy, Mary Wagner; treasurer, Rob-
ert D. Gibson, Carl Smith; football
manager, Robert Adams, Lyle Brad-
ley.
The junior engineer elections come
from 10 to 1 o'clock over theengineer
arch. The nominees are as follows:
President, Douglas Dow, Eugene Har-
beck; vice-president, Milton Goetz,
Emerson Swart; secretary, Edward
Bradley, Wyalter Simmons; treasurer,
George McCordie, Herbert Shaw; foot-
ball manager, Daniel earney, Ken-
neth Ronan.
The sophomore engineers will have
their election at the same place from
2 to 5 o'clock in the afternoon. The
nominees are: President, Edward
Johns, Rex Reson; vice-president, R.
Iland, C. E. Proctor; secretary, Ed-
ward Haugh, Robert Stoddard; treas-
urer, Bernard Butler, Thomas Lynch,
IHenry Morton; football manager,
Raymond Olds, Joseph Vleck.
The results of the freshman engin-
eer nominations held yesterday are
as follows: Secretary, Henry Slaugh-
ter, Chester Swigert; treasurer, Rus-
sell Paris, Robert Mitchell; football
manager, Harvey Reed, Cameron Ross.
The election for all the officers will
be held Friday afternoon.
Engineers Hold First Smoker of Year

Music, songs, and speeches livened
up the first' engineering smoker of
this year which was held in the Union
last night at which Dean Mortimer E.
Cooley, of the engineering , college,
gave a short survey of the Engineer-
ing society, showing how its growth
corresoionded to that of the Technic.

THIRD ANNUAL TRADITIO0NS DAY
SCHEDULED FOR TONIGHT1 CLS
OF '24 WILL, BE TOLD CUST

WHO iS YOUR
FOR U.

CHOICE
S. PRESIDENT'

Students are urgeil to ex-
press their preference for the
presidency of the United States
for the ensuing years.
On the dotted lines below,
place your choice for President
-Harding, Cox, Debs, or any of
the candidates, then your class,
and whether you are a man or
woman. Mention if you are a
faculty member.
Mail this slip or take it to the
office of The Michigan Daily in
the Press building by noon
Thursday. Place it in an envel-
ope for the Sunday editor.
The result of the straw ballot
will be published Sunday, in
connection with the political fea-
tures in the Sunday Supple-
ment.
My Choice for Presidet
.. ....................
M ale ......... . .. .. .. .. ...
Female ..................
Faculty ..................
Class...........
0RRANGE FOR PARAE Of
E-SERTICE MEN NOT I11
With both University and city of-
ficial; working in hearty co-operation,
plans for the celebration of Armistice
day,, on Thursday, Nov. 11, are pro-
gressing rapidly, and everything is
practically arranged for the affair.
Mayor G. R. Wurster has promised
to call upon all citizens and merchants
to display flags, and unite in the ob-
servance of the day which is being
celebrated on a large scae through-
out the country.
At the meeting of the Veterans of
Foreign Wars, held last night at the
Union, final arrangements for the
parade were thoroughly' gone over,
and the line of march announced. All
overseas men will assemble at 2
o'clock at the corner of ' North and
East University avenues, and led by
the Varsity band will march down
North University avenue to Fifth ave-
nue, and thence to the City hall, wihere
the city detachment will fall in. The
line of march from the City hall will
be Huron to Main Street, Main to
Packard street, Packard to State
street, and State street to Hill auditor-
ium, where formal exercises for the
day will take place.
In the parade will be four student
detachments, consisting of soldiers,
sailors, marines, and men without
uniform. Other organizations to be
represented are the Spanish War vet-
erans, state troops, Boy Scouts, and
city officials. The Varsity and Ma-
sonic bands will head the procession.
"It is the duty.of all ex-service men
on the campus;" said W. B. Gilbert,
'22E, post commander, last night, "to
send home for their uniforms and
march in the parade. President Mar-
ion L. Burton has declared Nov. 11
a half holiday, and we should signify
our appreciation by turning out en
masse. If it is impossible for any
man to secure his uniform, however,
he can march in the plain clothes de-
tachment which is being organized for
just that reason."

CARL JOHNSON, '20, OF OLY
SQUAD, WILL
PRESIDE
ALL MEN ON PROGRA
KNOWN BYSTUDE
FreshmepfRequested to Arrive
and Occupy Front
Seats,
With its purpose the insiruct
,the class of 1924 in the traditic
Michigan, the committee in char
the -third annual Traditions Pa
ebration to be held at '7:30 o'clo
night in Hill auditorium has se
speakers, every one of whom ar
known to the student body.
Carl Johnson, '20, president c
year's Student council, captain e
track team in his senior year
member of the American 01
squad, will preside over the men
The first sneaker, James K. We
'10, who will represent the al
was one of Yost's staunch play
'08 and '09 when he played, eithe
ter, fullback, or guard. He w
Rhodes schwar from Michigan
studied at Oxford for three year
Aigler to Speak
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler of the
school will represent the facult
James McClintock, '21L, will
for the student body. Praci
every phase of University life
everything that Michigan means
students, the alumni, and the fa
will be explained and wherefc
Michigan traditions and custom
be the principal theme of the s
ers, their origin will be expl
and also why they should be fos
The Varsity band and A: O.
bert, '21E, official cheerleader,
add the final touch of finesse to a
Michigan gathering,. An. added
ture will be a quartette compos
Albert F. Shirmer, '22E, Paul W
'20, Kemp Keena, '21, and Thom
Underwood, '22.
Doors -Open at 7
The doors of the auditorium w
opened at 7 o'clock and the me
will begin promptly at 7:30. 1
men are asked to come early a
in the front seats, the rest of th
will be occupied by sophomore
upperclassmen.
It is promised that the pro
will last only about one hour any
everything will be brisk and si
just long enough to put acros
message in good form.

REGENTS MAKE
A RECOGNIZED

IF

ELECTIONS TODAY!

Students and landladies with room-
ing grievances to settle are asked to
meet the Union rooming committee,
which will be in session from 2 to 4
o'clock today in room 304 of the
Union. The committee will do its
best at this time to arrive at ,a settle-
ment of existing differences between
students and landladies over rooms
and advise with men desiring to
change rooms.-

Senior lit election will be
held from 9 to 1 o'clock today in
University hall, while the sopho-
more lits will elect their officers
from 2 to 5 o'clock this after-
noon in the same place.
Junior engineer election will
be held from 10 to 1 o'clock to-
day in the room over the engi-
neering arch. The sophomore
engineers are to have their elec-
tion from 2 to 5 o'clock.

Recognition was given to boxin
the last meeting of the Board o
gents, when a sum of money wa
propriated for the purpose of h
a first class bo;ing instructor.
sport will be placed under the;
of physical education and intran
activities and- will be directi
charge' of the boxing coach.
As soon as the instructor is
pointed free training in boxing w'
open to all University students.
work will be taught first and as
as the men acquire some skill
vidual coaching will be given.
The Regents were greatly 11fi
ed in making this step by the
tions circulated last year by
boxing club, for recognition of
sport, to which over 2,600 names
signed.

rr n r rr

r

Friday
Oct.29

S1X

Brilliant

Opera Stars

8P.M.

GI VANNI MARTINELLI, TENOR MAIIE RAPPOLD, SOPRANO
NN4A MORGANA, SOPRANO GIUSEPPE CORALLO, TENOR
HELENA MARSH, CONTRALTO THOMAS CHALMERS, BASS
EMILIO ROXAS, AT THE PIANO
IN A PROGRAM OF VERDI - PUCCINI MUSIC AS GIVEN AT THE FAMOUS SUNDAY EVENING
CONCERTS AT THE METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE
COURSE TICKETS (with $3.00 Festival Coupon) $4.50 -+ $5.00 - $5.50 - $6,00., INDIVIDUAL CON-
CERTS $1.00 - $1.50 - $2.00 FOR SALE AT THE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC - MAYNARD STREET
W.._____ 7

FIVE BIG
CONCERT
LATER

ANN ARBOR'S
GREATEST CONCERT

Americ's

I Createst Star

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