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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 10, 1921 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-06-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

UNIVERSITY

e p

rning except Monday' during the Univer-
in Control of Student Publications.
F THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
as is exclusively entitled to the use for
idispatches credited to it or net otherwise
id the local news published therein.
office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
-ier or mail, $3.50.
r Press building, Maynard Street.
p6o; Fditorial, 244.4
to exceed 300 words, 'if signed, the ig-
:o appear in print, but as an evidence of
nts will be published in The Daily at the
if left, at or mailed to The Daily office.
is will receive no conisideration. No man-
unless the writer incloses postage. I"
)t necessarily endorse the sentiments. -
rations.
notices will not be received aftar 8 o'clock

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
3 EDITOR ............GEORGE H. BROPHY JR.
. ...... . ........Chesser M. Campbell
ditorial Board.......................Lee Woodruff
irs-
R. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
Dakin J. E~. McManis
aud Sherwood T. W. Sargent, Jr.
or ....... ... ... ... ... ... ... J. A. Bernstein
A. B. P. Campbell
... . J. Whinery, L . Kern, S.. Beach
....Robert Angetl
itor.................................Mary D. Lane
................ Thomas Dewey
....................... .... .: R. Meiss

Assistants
Frank H. McPike
J.A. Bacon
W.W. Ottaway
Paul Watzel
Byron Darnton
M. A, Klaver
Walter Donnelly
Beata Hasley
Kathrine *ontgomery

Sidney B. Coates
C. 'T.Pennoyer
Marion B. Stahl
Lowell S. Kerr
Marion Koch
Dorothy Whipple'
Gerald P. Overton
Uward Lamvrecht
Sara Wailer
$. IC. Howlett

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
INESS MANAGER........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
,tSn .......,....................;...... D. P. oyce
iieds .........................................S Kunstadter
L3tioU .. .............F . M. eab
sit.'.'.'.'...................................E. R. Prieh
Eation ..................................V. F. Hilery
Assistants
W. Lamrecht Mv. M. Moul H. C. Hunt
. Ham Jr N. W. Robertson M.' S. Goldring'
H. Hutchinson Thos. L. Rice H. W. Heidbreder
A. Cross R. GG. Rurchell W. Cooley
t ..Davis A. 3. Parker
Persons wishin to secure information concerning news for any
p f The D ailyshouldsttheniight editor, who has full charge
Ii ew to be printed that night.
FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1921.
Night Editor-JOHN A. BACON.
THAT BELATED REVISION
,ast fall, when asked why the price of board'
tiniued at the peak levels of the summer before
he face of a decline from fifteen to twenty per-
t in the price of foodstuffs, Ann Arbor board-
house keepers justified their charges on the fol-
ing grounds: First, that overhead expenses
e as great as ever;second, that labor costs were
iter; and third, that they had stocked up on
fed goods at summer rates. In the face of
e circumstances they then, ,and have since,
ted all declines in food prices as practically in-
ificant factors in the determinationi of board
ifs.
a a review of the situation this spring for the
pose Hof ascertaining equitable summer school
'fall session rates, it becomes apparent that la-
costs arid overhead have become less if they
e changed at all, and that the heavily stressed
ned goods matter has, or should have, dropped
of consideration entirely.
his leaves the price of food, which as everyone
ws Is the controlling element in the cost of pre-
ng board, more important than ever. In this
nection the following figures, obtained from a
I grocer, giving a comparison between the price
:ertain common staples a year ago when board
generally fifty cents per week cheaper, and the
es today, are in point.
ay 1, 1920, one hundred pounds of sugar,
ch now -cost $8.50, sold for $30; a bushel of
toes, now 75 cents, cost $5.25; a sack of
rer, now $i.i5, cost $2.15; a pound of coffee of
present 40 cent grade sold for 50 cents; and
s, which are"selling at present at 25 cents a
en, were 50 dents a dozen. Butter, which can
'be purchased at 50 cents a pound, then brought
ents ; lard which is now 20 cents per pound was
cents; .a dozen cans of peas which were then
now cost $1.5o; canned corn or tomatoes has
;ped from $2.25 to $1.75; bacon from 6o cents
5 cents a pound; and, beef has. declined from 17
i cents a pound.
ithough liquidation of war-prices has been tak-
place all over the country in other lines, it has
yet scarcely 'touched Ann Arbor food tariffs.
y a marked revision will remedy the glaring dis-
>ancy between them and the decreased costs
ch are brought out by the above-given facts.
THE PERCENTAGE MISTAKE
here have been occasions in the past when stu-
ts, unsatisfied with the grade they have re-
ed in a certain course, have appealed to their
ructors, only to. receive the reply, "I realize
you deserve a higher mark, but I can only give
rtain percentage of A's and somebody had to
eft out". In one case at least, a most con-
nitious professor had one morei, A student than
supposed percentage allowed him, and in order
e impartial, he gave no A's at all in that par-
far class. The fallacy of such a course is ob-
is, and it is hard to believe that the University
dd authorize and. enforce such a method of

books. The nearest approach is an official sugges-
tion that over a period of a number of semesters,
the scholastic averages of all instructors should be
about the same; and certain standard percentages
are given. Such an announcement is absolutely
necessary for uniform marking, for the members
of the faculty are drawn from many different sec-
tions of the country where different bases of grad-
ing are employed. The University authorities
rightly believe that over a period of years no one
instructor will have a higher grade of students than
another, but do not contend that an individual class
may not be superior to those that immediately pre-
cede or follow it.
For this reason the instructor who is forced to
deprive certain deserving students of a higher mark
for the sake of a standard' of averages to which he
must conform, makes those students the victims of
his own lamentable misunderstanding. The elimi-.
nation of this not uncommon percentage mistake
will wipe out a condition which seriously affects the
fairness of Michigan's grading system.
HIS MAJESTY THE CHAMP
On July secontd a boxing msatch will be held in
Jersey City between Jack Dempsey, World's Cham-
pion heavyweight fighter, and Georges Carpentier,
-French champion of the same class. For nearly
two years this contest has been talked of and dis-
cussed by every loyal fan and admirer of the sport.
And during these same two years Jack and Georges
have been playing tag over two continents while
the promoters have been running things.
No 'other sport has reached the height of corm-
mercialism that boixng has attained, and no other
sport is in so much danger of falling into disre-.
pute. The mere fact that the fighting game has be-
come so commercialized is not to be so 'sadly la-
mented, for after all it is human nature to get all
one can, but this very commercialism has apparently
caused the fighting game to degenerate into a money
grasping contest with every one getting his'money's
worth except the public.
In the old days a fighter fought more for the love
of the game and the amount he received was of
secondary, importance. But today instead of a cham-
pion fighting fiften or twenty times a year as was
customary when John L. Sullivan was undisputed
king of the heavyweights, the fighter attains the
championship and then assumes the '"public be
damned" attitude. After participating in' the usual
number of moving 'pictures and perhaps a year with
the circus, it is barely possible that he will take on
some second rater for a ten round no-decision, no-
fight bout' after which follows another year of ring
inactivity.
The fear of losing the championship coupled with
the auctioneering method of the promoters are the
two factors that have reduced boxing to its present
state. Assuredlyit should be possible to get around
hese obstacles if a national commission were ap-
pointed with the power to control the championship'
and forfeit it upon the failure of the title holder
to defend his crown within a reasonable length of
time. From the activity recent champions in the
ring have shown it is about time something like this
was done.
The Telescop e
. P.
Music Hath Charms'
(To be sung to the tuneof "I Dreamt That I
Dwelt', tc.)
One day I was sitting in Tappan hall,
As with knowledge the teacher did cram me;
When outside the window I heard a faint call.
As of somebody singing "My Mammy'
Now never 'before was such sweet music heard,
It nearly broke up the meeting;
And guess what it was, not, a man nor a bird,
'Twas Marion's lambs a-bleating.
Won't somebody please tell us who wrote
"League-house Nights"?

There was a young feller named Buck,
Who ran in some very hard luck;
When he bought a Ford,,
All the girls he adored,
Just refused to go out in the truck.
Yesterday as we were walking with a senior, we
thought we would be gallant, and said, "Well, how
does it feel to 'be on your last lap"? and we've been
wondering ever since just why she immediately
broke off all diplomatic relations with us.'
Qu oth Eppie Taf:
Here lies Jim Jones who with one hand
Drove his car;
But neither he nor his machine
Got very far.
Motorcycle cop-I'm sorry, lady, but PIl have to
arrest you for speeding; you were running forty
miles an hour.
The lady-Why that's clearly impossible! I have-
n't been out an hour.
Some people are so strong that they hire a row-
boat and try to pull up the river.
Our Latest Song Entitled:
"A Litter of Deer Are Usually Worth a Few
Bucks."
Famous Closing Lines
"That's another story," said the elevator boy as

G

R

A

H

BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

I

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. M.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. M.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex.
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48'p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5: 55a.m., 7:00 a.m.{
and every two hours to 9:00 p.im.,
also 11:00 p.mi. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson--7:b0 a. im., and
12:10 p.m.
1921 JUNE 1921'
S. M. T. W. T. F. S.
1 2 3 4
'5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15t 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30
PANAXAS r
We Clean, Bleach and Block
Panamas, etc., into the L.ate
Shapes, with all new trimmings
to look just like new. We don't
use any acids and do only High
Class Work. Factory Hat Store,
617 Packard St. Phone 1792.

FOR SALE

,A BOOK FOR GRADUATION FROM

A large number of piano, phonograph, and record boxes
various sizes-excellent for packing purposes.
UNIVERSITY MUSIC HOUSE
MRS. M. M. ROOT
LIBERTY AT MAYNARD
PHONE 1799

For Service
CALL
ANN ARBOR
YELLOW CAB CO.
Lobby of American Hotel

BU
ADRIAN-TECU
Central

S

A

M

[v.
Lv.
I4v.
Lv.
Ar.
Lv.
Lv.
A r.

NORTH We
A.
Adrian-Main corners.......7:
Tecumseh--Main' Corners..8:
Clinton-Main Corners......8
Saline-Main Corners.......g9
AnnArbor-Main & Huron.... io'
SOUTH P.]
Ann Arbor-Huron & 4th Ave. 4
Saline-Main Corners........ s
Clinton-Main Corners......6
Tecumseh-Main Corners..... 6:
Adrian-Main Corners.......7:

S

PAINT

SPECIALTY
SALESMAN

a~

TeTurkish, C3~ar

to sell our complete line of
paints, varnishes and roofing
specialties to consumer trade
on straight commission basis,
exclusive territories granted.
In one letter state age, pre-
vious experience, references,
territory' or towns you can
cover. Only producers will
be consideredwho can make
some real money.
THE FOREST CITY

We go 6000 miles for th
Turkish tobacco
used in Murad-Why?
Because'-Turkish has a taste -Turkish l
,mildness -Turkish has a delight-far beyond
cigarette tobaccos of all other lands-
Murad gives you real enjoyment, and
delight such as no Tobacco other than 100%]F
Turkish Tobacco can give.
Facts -Facts--FACTS

PAINT & VARNISH

COMPANY

Tens of thousai
-tens of thousat
have PROVEN t ug fo Y
udge for Y

3334 Lakeside Ave.,
Cleveland, Ohio,

In business over

fifty years

-Ic

aoc- - - - - - - - - - - - - - --k

blotter today

"LUCKY" POCKET BLOTTER
GOOD LUCK. SALE
From this Saturday to next Saturday inclusive
EVERYTHING A MAN WEARS at REDUCED PRICES
nishings Wagner & CompanyHats
STATE STREET AT LIBERTY
GOOD LUCK FOR YOUR EXAMS AND SUMMER

We lill furnish the opportunity

WAGNER

& COMPAJ

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