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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 09, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-06-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

U aiI
UNIVERSITY

ning except Monday during the Univer-
Control of Student Publications.
PTHE ASSOCIATED PRESS
is is exclusively entitled t. the use for
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
I the local news published therein.
fice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second

nard Street.

iceed 3oo words, if signedthe sig
ear in print, but as an evidence of
ill be published in The Daily at the
ft at or mailed to The Daily office.
1 receive no consideration: No man-
the writer incloses postage.
essarily endorse the sentiments ex-
es will not be recetved after $ o'clock

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
AGING EDITOR ............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
>dtr.............. ..Cheser MV Campbell
n. Edal Board.................... ee Wodraff
>*I H~kdam H. W. Hitchecck
I. Dakin -f J. E. McManis
enaud Sherwood r. W. Sarent, Jr.
ditor..................... . . A . er B. . Ber ac
ials.............T. J. WhieryLA. KernS. Teach
.............obert Angell
en's wdtr..............Mary bD.Iane'
ap: :.:::::::::::::.::: :Thomas Dewey
oa. ... .................... ... r. Ri eiSs
Asstats
tine' Walde Frank H. McPike Sidney B. Coates
l. Weber 7. A. Bacon C. T. Pennoyer
eth Vlckery W. W. Ottaway Marion B. Stahl
e Rolndel Paul Watzel Lowell . Kerr
113 Grundy Byrn Danton Marion Koch
e Oberholtzer M A.. Kiaver Dorothy Whipple
E. Adamx Walter Donnelly Gerald P. Overton
e F. Elott Beata Hasey dward Lambrecht
on MlceIn Kathrline Montgomery ara Walrer
H. E. Howlett
BU8LESS STAFF
Teltephoe 96
MESS MANAGER,.........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.'
tising P....... ........... . P Joyce
eds..................S.'Kunstadter
atlon ........ ......................F. M. Heath
tss...................E. R. Pries
tlen''....... ........'..... '..... .;. .'..V.. F. Hillery
.- - ,Assistants '
'. Lambrecht, M. M. Moule H. C. Hunt
iamel, Jr N. W. Robertson M. S. Goldring
i.Hutchinson Thos I Rice H. W Heidbreder
4 rd : RG. Burchell a W. Cooley
t L. Davis A. J. Parker
6rsods wshing to secure informaton' conerning news for any
df The Daily should "sethe night editor, who has full charge
news to be printed that night.
THURSDAY, JUNE 9, 1921.
Night Editor-G. P. OVERTON.'
ICISM OF CRITICISM AD INFINITUM
iong the nmany smart editorials published in
te issue of Chimes, there appeared onie enti-
"Criticism of Criticism of Criticism" which
imed at The'Daily's recent mal-teatment of
Mencken. Even the typographical error, "H'
[enckei" printed in the head of a story
ghout wlhich, however, the initials were used
:ly, was scoredI as unfathomable ignorance by
s, whose columns are replete with such mis-
as "that Sage is trying to hoodwink is", an
which appears in the very same article. But
an example is trivial; the worst is yet to
wards the close of its sharp editorial, Chimes,
knowledged literary magazine of the Univer-
f Michigan, takes its final jab at the illiter-
aily, quoting the latter's shrieking error in
nar, "A great heap 'of destructive books is
less to a man's credit than if he had stopped
". Oh shameless Daily,, to print such a ne-
ts breach of the English language. And indeed,
ere 'almost ashamed of ourselves, when upon
ng through "The Conning Tower"wcolumn of
few York Tribune, we noticed the following
ks concerning "Criticism of Criticism of Crit-
: "It's the Big Things of Life, like Football
aseball and Hydraulics, that they specialize in
n Arbor. Let the effete Oriental universities
e over their English! 'Bob Sage',. says the
gan Chimes, 'whom. we believe wrote the corn-
ation * * *. '. What a doddering old man
e getting to be! We believe that such an ex-
n of English is a greater disgraceto the Uni-
r of Michigan than it would be to lose another
to Ohio State".
ehooves a literary magazine such as Chimes
ye into that greatest book of all time and
)ut the significant phrase, "Let him cast the
one", and so forth, fbr future application.
"PUTTING OVER A FAST ONE"
n older day the pun attained high popularity
witty conversationalists. Then the pun
beyond the stage of highly approved good
and the punster was looked upon as more or
a boresome ass, because he ran a good thing
th and depended solely gn punning as a sb-
for legitimate conversation.
passing of the pun led in due time to the pro-
ri of a "line" by those who have a gift for
:hatter without solid thought to back them

Hlanding out a line" came to be the approved
for "clever" men to do. But really, you
there are so many pseudo-clever representa-
if the middle class mind that one must re-
:onstantly on guard lest one be taken for a
bourgeoise. Of late they have adopted and
: to such an extent that it has been scarcely
e to differentiate between their "lines" and
>f the truly witty man of clever attainment.
only thing for the "clever" man to do was to
he line and substitute some other mode of
-twisting more difficult of imitation. He has
sequence evolved something new: "Putting

A fast one has something of the element
of the pun in that it has a possibility of
double meaning; one that will get in any circle of
society and one that is of doubtful or out and out
rotten character. Clever? Undeniably, most of
them are, but we are prone to discount this type of
cleverness.
We are, or should be, here to acquire as much
worth-While knowledge as we possibly can. To
spend our time in attempts to say indecent or nasty
things under the guise of the perfectly innocuous
is an unforgiveable waste. We are throwing away
our time, we are misdirecting our energies and we
are gradually tearing apart our moral fiber when
we do it. .
Most of us have a deep-rooted admiration for
clever people, but cleverness alone is more apt to
lead to the gutter than to success. Practice in
"Putting over the fast ones" is undoubtedly produc-
.tive of one type of cleverness but it is the wrong
type; it stresses superficiality and questionable mor-
ality without giving the solid basis in knowledge
which is necessary to-the cleverest man if he is to
accomplish any work worthy of the name.
We wonder how long it will take the speed boys'
to realize that the "fast ones" are all wrong, or
when they will awaken to the fact that really clever
people move along quietly, taking advantage of
their every opportunity and laughing quiety at the
antics of the superficial conversationalists. -
THE LEARNED LUMBERJACK
By the unanimous decision of university authori-
ties a lumber jack forty-two years of age - an en-
gineering student in the University of Washington
whose education until a year ago was confined to
the seventh grade of an Irish grammar school -
was termed one of the twenty-five most brilliant
minds -in the United States. This honor was con-
fered upon him as a result of making a perfect
score in the army "alpha" intelligence test. He re-
quired only thirteen of the seventeen minutes al-
lowed to complete the test, a feat which was un-
equaled by any of the .3,ooo,ooo service men who
took this examination during the war period. Some
of the words whose meaning he had to give to an-
swer the questions are, pomology, cleistogamous,
chamfer, 'and guimpe.
It 'is almost safe to say that the average college
student could! not give the meaning of 'more than
one of thefour words above' listed. It is perfectly
safe to say that during this man's first year at the
university he did not acquire all of the knowledge
necessary to make a perfect score on such an ex-
amination. He succeeded in coming out ahead of
the three million other contestants beeuse he made
the best of the opportunities at hand though he had
not the opportunity, to attend college.
Such an accomplishment ought to teach this much
at least: that the world judges the extent that we
are' educated by what we know, and not by what we
have studied ; and while the university is the ideal
medium through which an education may be se-
cured, it is not the only one, and we can continue
our training to good advantage after we have left
our alma mater.
Twenty freshman volunteers got after the green
paint on the campus sidewalks with chemicals Lue -
day night. Why isn't this a good example to the
Del Pratt enthusiasts who !did their advertiing on
the walks?

G

R

A

H

A

A BOOK FOR GRADUATION FROM

4M

BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Expre sscars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. n.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to _Jackson at 8:48 a. mn. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m." Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two1
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-: 55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11: 40' p.m. 12:25 a.mn., and 1:15 a.mn.
Locals to Jackson---7: &0,. .,and.
12:10 p.m.

Our SPRING assortment comprises

S

many
SURPRISES

In fact we do not know which will
please most, the' moderate prices or
wonderful fabrics. You don't'need a
BIG income to get our
BIG VALUES
Cordial invitation is extended to

191 JUNE 1921
S. M. T. W. T. F. S.
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30
PANAMAS
We Clean, Bleach and Block
Panamas, etc., into the Late
Shapes, with all new trimmings
to look just like new. We don't
use any acids and do only High
lass Work. Factory Hat Store,
617 Packard St. Phone 1792.

I

PARTICULAR MEN

PALM BEACH

FLANNEL TROUSERS

Automobiles- for llire
By Hour or by Trip
REASONABLE PRICES
Cars running to Whitmore Lake
every day
$1.00 Round Trip
Phone 903-M
Not less than five Passengers
I b~ r

J. KARL MALCOLM
604 East Liberty Street.

Chinese

Garden

is serving a

CARTE DE JOUR LUNCH

11

FROM 1 TO 2.

Sleep APyplace hut
:fat at Rex "s
THE ;CLUB LUNCH
712 ARBOR STREET
Near State and Packard

Quick Service

,

I- "I

READY TO SERVE MENU

TAKE DTI
MONEY NEEDED
F0 Y01jk TlrI?

Change of Bill Each Day

The Telescop e
'Tis said that in the days of old
When men wore iron B. V. D.s,
The tailor warmed up to his job
For pressing was done by degrees,
And when a knight would rend his clothes
In fighting o'er some siren,
'Tis said they could not mend the rend
Without a welding iron.
Today's oxygen-ventilated powder-puff is award-
ed to the half-wit who wears pumps because she has
water on the knee. -
Quoth Eppie Taff:
H-lere lies T1hco-
Yobis MacDuff
He sneezed to death
From taking snuff.,
Shados - a Pantowine in One Act
Scene I-A porch at night. Hour is 10 o'clock.
Porch is deserted. The are light on the corner
makes fantastic shadows of the trees.
Scene II-Same porch, Mme night. Hour is
10:15. Two distinct outlines are seen seated on
the porch rail. The are light on the corner makes
fantastic shadows of the trees.
Scene III-Same porch, same night. Hour is
10:20. One larger outline can be seen on the porch
rail. The are light on the corner 'makes fantastic
shadows of the trees.
Scene IV-The hour is 'Io:31. Same porch,
same night, - deserted ! The are light on the cor-
ner makes fantastic shadows of the trees.
Erma.
Our Latest 'Song Entitled:
"She Takes Her Gum Out of Her Mouth, So to
Speak."
Famous Closing Lines
"Why does everybody pick on me," complained
the mandolin. ERM.

Prices very low

for this Luncheon Service

l~E'

"GET THE NAB

H Zare yotiy in; the
funds that the trip through the
United States;toEvropelorSouth
AmeriIrt l1Orient;/will
regi ?Hwwl tefunds
be protected so that th rinci-
pa may ife andtat the in-
tereston your funds may be'an
assuredlfreedom frai1!anxiety
about money matters.
Howar other touriststaking
thei fids3 Howshouldyoii
(o* 'au ishuid you take
to a the purser4the .hotel
the rdt shop
on
badoab et' on'

.

a7

Ti. T'urkish
* -.

pOt rtmtBfad we cau tell
Bt~ST"I( fods .fo ra~veJers~
FARMERS AND
ME HANICS BANK

We go 6000 miles for the
Turkish- tobacco
used in Murad-Why?
Because-Turkish has a taste-Turkish has a
mildness--Turkish has a delight-far beyond all
cigarette tobaccos of all other lands-
Murad gives you real enjoyment, and true
delight such as no Tobacco other than 100% Pure
Turkish Tobacco can give.
Facts-Facts-FACTS,-!

Em

I

Tens of thousands of smokers
-tens of thousands of times-
have PROVEN this -
"Judge for Yourself-!"

200

330 South State
101 South Main

A"Wo

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