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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 24, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IrliauDaily.

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPRR OF TH UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except "Monday during the Univer.
rear by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
Aication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
ted in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
)flices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
hones: Business, 96o; Editorial. 2414.
communications not to exceed 3oo0words, if signed, the sig-#
"e not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
tion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
ged communications will receive no consideration. No man-
pt will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
Che Daily des not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex.
ed in the communications.
What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
e evening preceding insertion.
EDITORAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
AGING EDITOR ............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR
Editor.......................Chesser M. Campbell
Editorsd H. W. Hitchcock
B. H. Aamspe J. E. MManis
J. . Cakpbel T. W. Sajrgent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood1
;y Editor-,.... . A. Bernstein
ials............. Lee Woodruff, Robert Sge, T. .Whinery
ant News.-. ............;............Robert*ejoy Jr.
s . ... ........ .. RoertAngell
en's Editor..........................Mary D. Lane
raph ..--...........................WestsGaIlogly
:ope . .... ............. .........Jack W. Kelly

>hine Waldo
G. Wfber
mna Barlow
bbeth Vickery
;Clark
ge Reindel
thy Monfort
y B. Grundy

Assistants
Frances Oberholtzer
Robert E. Adams
Norman C. Damon
Byron Darnton
Thomas n. Dewey
Wallace Elliott
Leo J. Hershdorfer

L. Armstrong Kern
Hughston McBain
Frank H. McPike
Gerald P.'Overton
Edward Lambrecht
William H. Riley Jr.
Sara Walter,

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 980
NESS tANAGER..........LEGRAND'A. GAINES JR.

..... ..D. P Joyce
3 ...................-...........Rob 0.Kerr
on............................. M. Heath
, ................... E. R. Prighs
n'................. .................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
ambrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
wer F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Kinstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
nel Jr. D. S. Watterworth

La
Go
arr

J
w

he night editors for the week will be as fol-
s: Monday night, Jack Dakin; Tuesday night,
irnton Sargent; Wednesday night, $rewster
npbell; Thursday night, Hugh Hitchcdck; Fri-
night, Thomas Adams; Saturday night, John
Vianis.

wishing to secure information concerning news for any
Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
o be p rinted that night

_. .._.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1920.

i

KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
The College of Dental Surgery was opened in
875 with a two year course of six months each,
ear. In 1884 the terms were lengthened to nine
onths, but was again increased in 1899 to a three
ear course. Beginning with the session of 1917-
)18 the present four year course has been com-
.lsory. The degree of DD.S. has always been
yen.
THREE MORE GAMES!
Just by one kick!
That's the tale of it; and it signifies the truth
hich every spectator at that game perceived: that
ie Michigan team, though defeated, was never
aten ; that it fought to win, and not to hold, un-
1 the sound of the last whistle. That 4m isn't
paten yet. The fight it put up against Illinois
ould hearten, not dispirit, every Michigan man
id woman, for there are three games left for the
aize and Blue to play. Let's cash in on every
e ! A team is remembered by its entire season,
t by one game - and not by one kick.
For those three games - and perhaps the chain-
onship yet - every Michigan heart loyal and
iafraid, and staunch behind our team !
AIR YOUR POLITICAL VIEWS
In the hopes of being able to.arouse more enthu-
asm than has heretofore been shown on the cam-
is regarding the coming presidential campaign,
he Daily has decided to publish such communica-
>ns on the subject as may be found worthy.
The average student voter too often'takes the
mpaign in a spirit of apathy, balloting more
rough a feeling of prejudice than through any
al convictions. Great issues are at stake in this
ll's elections, and we, as people who lay claim to
mething more than average intelligence, have no
ght to cast our ballots without first having given
e matter real consideration and earnest thought.
here are points of real virtue in the, Democratic
atform, and there are virtues in that of the Re-
iblican party, and we, as students, should thor-
ighly weigh and consider both sides of the ques-
n before making a choice for the candidate off
:her party. We should remember that, although
e may think the candidates themselves are un-
orthy in some respects, they are the representa-
res of the ideals for which each party stands, and
e means by which those ideals will be put into
eration.
This airing of- our views on the matter through
e medium of The Daily should have the effect of
inging before the readers some of the real is-
es at stake. But more than that, it should fur-
sh each one of us with an incentive for looking
material on the subject, considering both sides
the question, talking it over with our friends,

and getting into the spirit of the campaign as citi-
zens should .
CARBON COPIES AND INDIVIDUALS
The apparent necessity for short story writers,
moving picture producers, and playwrights to re-
duce certain classes of people to type forms has
resulted in a picture of the college man that is all
too familiar. This type possesses all the superfi-
cialities and lacks all the better qualities to be
found in the college student. Though the practice
of thus representing the student is manifestly un-
fair, it has become so widespread that the popular
conception of the college man is that of th'e posters
rather than that of real life.
Doubtless enough a college type does exist. There
is a pose many unconsciously endeavor to simu-
late-a sophistication of manner, a carefully ar-
ranged slovenliness of dress, and an air of cyni-
cism. These constitute the group that is accepted
as typical. That this type is in the minority, any-
one at all versed in college life will aver.
The members of this group are seeking false
standards. They are laying an undue stress upon
superficiality. The better side of an individual is
not a carbon copy of fthe group. It is the man who
is-to quote the cigarette advertisement-"dis-
tinctly individual," who does not ape the crowd in
dress, manners, and speech, but who sets up
standards for himself who is most to be admired.
He is the one who forces attention and wins an
enviable position for himself in the world's esi-
mation.
This type of man exists at colleges,, too; but, be-
cause he is always different from his associates,
he cannot be tagged and pigeonholed so readily as
the less admirable type that has become so well
known. Consequently we seem eternally doomed
to see the "college type" stealing the school bell
in the short storie, running the length of the field
for the winning touchdown in the movies, and
wearing blazing red sweaters on the musical com-
edy stage.
THE PRESIDENT'S HINTS
For the starter in a university, there is always
the problem of getting into the rottine of work;
while for the upperclassman who has learned the
college method of study, there still remains the mat-
ter of applying acquired information to his mode
of thinking as a student should. These two facts
were particularly stressed by President Burton in
his series of informal talks to students.
The president pointed out the importance of se-
rious application both to work and to recreation.
He explained that we are here on our own respon-
sibility and that the results which we obtain from
our courses are dependent solely upon ourselves.
He emphasized especially the necessity of a full-
time budget for all our waking hours so that we
might avoid the useless waste of a minute here and
a minute there which is so apt to creep into a dis-
organized study program. Turning to the upper-
classmen, President Burton appealed to thea to
use their intellects in a critical way, pondering over
new knowledge andtesting it to ascertain its truth
or fallacy before accepting it wholly.
Most of us, no matter what our class in the Uni-
versity, will find this advice of personal value.
Some scheme of systematicestudy is bound to re-
sult in more hours for recreation as well as for
work, through elimination of waste odds and ends
of time, and none of us will suffer from brain fever
if we question somewhat more closely each new
bit of information which comes our way.
The elescope
As Others See Us
In dreamy moments oft I wonder
Where they get that old time dope,
That this simple Daily bird
Hands out in the Telescope.
Overheard at the Game

She-But don't you think that one player was
just grand? He made a gain of from five to
twenty-five yards every time he had the ball.
Her escort-Why, which one do you mean?
She-Oh, I don't know his name, but he's the
one that was always blowing that little whistle.
William Bryan the other day said he only wanted
to serve as a private in the Democratic ranks.
Even our limited imagination can see poor Bill
getting court martialed or too much talking in the
ranks.
Dear Noah :
My wife has died. What shall I do now?
Bereaved.
Bury her.
The other day our landlady threatned to throw
us out of our room just because we're a few weeks
in.arrears with our rent. However, we wanted to
impress her with the fact that we haven't worn a
pot for over a year, and so said to her
"I know your tricks. Do you think I've lived
in Ann Arbor rooming houses two years for noth-
ing?"
"I shouldn't wonder, but you can't do it here,"
she says.
And ever since then we've been trying to think
up some scathing comeback.
Famous Closing Lines
"I'm a finished product," said the prize fighter
as he reeled to the floor. NOAH COUNT.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect June 15, 1920'
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
fbetroit at 6:10 a. m. and hourly to
9:10 p. M.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. in. and e: ery two
hours to 9:48 p. in.
Locals to Detroit-5: 55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m. and 1:10 a.m.
Locals tj Jackson-7 :50 a. m., and
12:10 .m.

i

FLYING
i I

I

This is Your opportunity to take a trip
in a SAFE aeroplane, piloted by an
experienced pilot.

I

GRAHAM

OVTOBER
°S M TW T

F
1

(Two Stores)

S
2

H. M. H. AIR SERVICE
'0.1. Hall, '23 E. '. C. .Atorison, '20 E. H. C Heym, '20

34 56789
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
30
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ei inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings,
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

t

II

TIME; Today and all this* #eek

FELU: Packard Ave. at City Limits

0

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Both

Special Rate $7,50 Per Flight

Io

FLYING

GRAHAM

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r

None

~

999

AOLLTKFF

TAXI

Ends of the Diagonal Walk

999

1a

[S

I

A Dodge Car
andDodge
Service- -
enough said®-

s
-~-

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TAXI

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LADIES' AND GENT'S
Dry and Steam Clea ing
Pressing and Repairing
"Gent's", Try a Real Hand Press
"SWAN AGENCY"
Snappy Laundry Service
MOLKY
Corner Maynard and Liberty Sts.

"NommaurAw

roam

Hti t I IIiIIINI[1111111UilNIrall 1[I I SI exI[IIItNIeII 11111tt Ie11111I
H illAuditorium - Friday, Oct. 29
GIOVANNI MA RTINELLI, Tenor
AND
MARIE RAPPOLD and NINA MOkGANA,
HELENASopranos
HELENA MARSH, GIUSEPPE CORALLO,
=Contralto Tenor
THOMAS CHALMERS, EMILIO ;'ROXAS,
_ yBass Pianist
IN A PROGRAM OF -
VERDI - PUCCINI MUSIC
_ As Given at the Famous Sunday Night Concerts at the
"- METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE
At this concert will appear the greatest galaxy of stars ever assembled
for an Ann Arbor Concert
OTHER CONCERTS IN THE SERIES WILL BE GIVEN
AS FOLLOwS:
Nov. 11 SERGEI RACHMANINOFF, fianist.
Dec. 13 JAN KUBELIK, Violinist.
Jan. 24 DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHES-
TRA.
Feb. 24MINNEAPOLIS SYMPHONY OR-
CH ESTRA
r7DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHES-
TRA.
A Limited Number of Course Tickets (with $3.00 Festival Coupon) are
Still Available at $4.50, $5.00, $5.50 and $6.00.
TICKETS FOR SINGLE CONCERTS - $1.00, $1.50, AND $2.00.
ON SALE AT °THE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Sleep Anyplace ut
.fat at Rex'"s
THE CLUB LUNCH
71Z ARBOR STREET
Near State and Packard

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