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October 24, 1920 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-24

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SECTION ,
ONE

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIG~HT ITIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 18. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1920. PRICE FIVE CEI

I

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I STRI, KE DELAED
* BY BRITISH RALl
LLOYD GEORGE WINS PLEA FOR
FURTHER DISCUSSION
WITH MINERS
UNION EXECUTIVES
HOLD CONFERENCES
Anxiety ; Remain's Although London
Papers See Hope for End of
Coal Dispute
BULLETIN
London, Oct. 28.-The railway-
men have postponed their pro-
prosed strike in -sympathy with
the miniers temporarily at the
request of the miners' executive,
It was announcedt this evening.
The miners have accepted an in-
vitatin from Premier Lloyd
George =for further, discussions.
(By Associated Press)
London, Oct. 23.-Informal conver-
astions, between the government and
individual leaders of the striking
British coal minei's were resumed
this morning. These discussions fol-
lowed conferences between Premier
Lloyd George and several other mem-
bers of the government. The secre-
tary of the miners' organization: was
among those consulted.
The invitation extended by the
National Union of Railway Men to
the miners' executive for a confer-
ence was accepted by the, miners'
body today. The. two bodies will go
into' sessfon late this afternoon, it
was announced. The results of this
conference are expected to have a vi-
tal effect on the strike situation.
The morning newspapers today
unanimously expressed the opinioni
that there still was hope of a set-
tlement of the coal dispute. Never-
theless anxiety remains,, especially
with regard to the .attitkude of the
railway men, : whose organization
seems to be controlled by the extrem-
ist section, led by C. T. Cramp, pres-
ident, rather than by the moderates,
represented by J. H. Thomas, gen-
eral secretary.
MIDDLEDITCH, '14, RETIRED
FROM ARMY, VISITING HERE
P. H. Middleditch, '14, former pres-
ident of the Athletic association, is
visiting in Ann Arbor. He was re-
cently retired from the army with
the rank of fsrst lieutenant, at Fort
Bayard, N. M., where he ,has been
stationed for the past 18 months.
VARSITY STARTS BASKETBALL
PRACTICE MONDAY EVENING
Varsity' basketball practice will
start Monday .evening, Oct. 25, at
7:30 o'clock, in Waterman gymna-
sium. Lockers and equipment will
be assigned at the athletic office
Monday morning. All men interested
in this sport should report.
Mandolin Club Calls for Tryouts
Tryouts are needed for the Man-
dolin club. The tryouts will be held
at 7 o'clock Monday, and Tuesday
nights in the musical activities room
of the Union.
THE WEATHER
U>settled; Probably Rain

DRAKE WINS BIG
TEN GOLF MEET
(Special to The Daily)
Chicago, Oct. 23.-Drake univer-
sity of Des Moines, Ia., won the first
annual golf tournament, held at
Olympia fields, Chicago, with the Uni-
versity of Chicago second.
The other Conference schools rank-
ed as follows: Ohio State, Illinois,
Michigan, Northwestern, and Wiscon-
sin.
Rudknepper, Iowa, State cham-
pion of the Chicago team won the in-
dividual honpre, with scores of 73-77.
McKee, of .Drake, was a close second,
74-80.
The tournament was a great suc-
cess, and, bids fair to become an
event of importance in the life of
Conference sport.
TORCHLIGHT PARADE TO
POLITICL MSS MEET
SPEECHES ON NATIONAL ISSUES
WILL BE GIVEN AT
WHITNEY
By the light of Roman candles and
the music of the Varsity band the
students interested in the national
and state political issues will march
from the campus to the Whitney thea-
ter Monday evening.
Congressman Joseph Fordney, of
Saginaw,chairman of the ways and
means committee, and Mrs. Mary
Van Vliet, of Alpena, candidate for
the electoralt college of Michigan,
will address the public at the Whit-
ney theater at 7:30 o'clock Monday
evening.
All students interested are re-
quested to meet in front of the Union
at 7 o'clock to form in a torchlight
procession behind the Varsity band,
which will lead the parade in uni-
form.
Both men and, women students
and the general public are urged to
,be pesent by the University Repub-
lican club, who are to have charge of
the meeting. Music will be furnish-
ed by the School of Music and by the
Varsity band.
COOLEY WL ADDESS
ALL-ENINEER SMOKER
Plans for the first all-engineer
smoker of the year to be held Wed-
nesday, Oct. 27, were discussed at a
recent meeting of the executive of-
ficers of the , Engineering society,
Chemical Engieering society, Civil
Engineering society, A. I. E. E., A.
S. M. E., and the Technic managers.
At this smoker the question of
whether or not the various profes-
sional societies shall become affiliat-
ed with and subsidiary to the main
Engineering society will 1e put Vp to
those present. Dean M. E. Cooley
will speak on the natural relation and
interdependence between the Engi-
neering society and the branch socie-
ties, and the importance of the func-
tioning of the society to the school.
The views of the officers of the
special societies on the advisability of
combination and co-operation in
planning social get-togethers and se-
curing speakers, will be given. The
committee in charge 'plan to make
this one of the peppiest smokers ever
staged, including speakers, smokes,
eats and drinks.

"U" SER ES TO
BE STARTED BY
BURTON TONIGHT
WILL DISCUSS "THE FUNCTION
OF RELIGION IN COL-
LEGE"
CHORUS OF 11 VOICES
TO RENDER ANTHEM
Work and Aims of University "Y" to
be Outlined by C. Stewart
Baxter
President Marion L. Burton will in-
augurate the Union services for this
year at 7 o'clock tonight in Hill au-
ditorium when he speaks to the stu-
dent body on the subject, "The Func-
tion of Religion in College Life."
Music for the services has been
placed in charge of William Wheeler,
head of the voice department of the
School of Music. The program for
tonight includes a soprano solo by
Mrs William Wheeler, with violin
obligato by Miss Marian Struble, organ
selections by Earl V. Moore of the
School of Music, and an anthem.
Wheeler Directs
Plans for the rendition of the an-
them have been changed slightly and
it will be given by a chorus of 11
voices under the direction of Mr.
Wheeler.
In addition to the address of the
evening by the President, C. Stewart
Baxter, president of the University
Students' Christian association, will
give a short talk on the work of the
organization and its aims for this
year.
Fred J. Petty, '21, will preside over
the service and the prayer will be
given by Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas, who
will also read the scripture.
In accordance with the plans for
having representative members of
campus organizations usher at these
meetings, members of Sphinx, honor-
ary junior literary society, and of
Triangles, honorary junior engineer-
ing society, will usher at the services
tonight.
Expect Crowd
Thomas S. Evans, secretary of the
University "Y," speaking of the meet-
ing, said yesterday: "We expect the
biggest crowd Sunday night that has
ever attended a Union service. The
fame of the speaker, his eminent abil-
ity to talk on the subject he is to dis-
cuss, and the natural interest the
students will have in hearing the ex-
pression of the attitude of the Presi-
dent of the University on the religious
side of university life, will all focus
interest on the meeting."
YESTERDAY'S GAMES

NO LOWER RATE
FOR OHIO GAME
No rate reduction will be allowed
students making the trip to Colum-
bus for the Ohio State game. W. E.
Wells, traveling passenger agent of
the Central States Passenger asso-
ciation, was in conference yesterday
with the Union committee in charge
of the trip, and he reported that his
association could not permit the cut.
The special train will be schedul-
ed, however, and the regular fare of
$13.54 will be charged for the round
trip. This train will leave Ann Ar-
bor at 7 o'clock on the morning of
the game. The tickets will be good
for 30 days from date of purchase.,
Tickets should be ready for sale by
Tuesday or Wednesday, at places to
be announced later.
PROF SADLER ILEAYES
FOR MEETING -IN Na Y.
WORK IS ON COMMITTEE CHOSEN
BY PRESIDENT
WILSONV
Prof. H. C. Sadler, head of the de-
partment of Naval Architecture and
Marine Engineering, left for New
York Friday to attend a meeting of
the United States government com-
mittee on bulkheads and freeboards
appointed by the secretary of com-
merce.'
Before the war no definite load-
line had been established for cargo
vessels. As soon as the United States
entered the president 'appointed a
commission to establish one. How-
ever, as Professor Sadler explained
in an interview, such a late start had
been made that it was decided to
adopt loadline standards sat by Great
Britain.
After hostilities ceased a commit-
tee was appointed which met for the
first time last May. The country was
divided up into three districts or sub-
committees: Eastern Coast, Great
Lakes, and Western Coast. Besides
being on the general committee, Pro-
fessor Sadler is also listed as chairb
man of the Great Lakes sub-com-
mittee.
Different problems! confront each
district due to different types of
steamers employed on the Great
Lakes and the coasts. Professor
Sadler says several years will be
needed to establish best results for
loadlines of each particular case.
HARVARD DEFEATS
CENTRE, 31 TO 14-
Cambridge, Oct. 23.-Harvarda de-
feated Centre college of Danville, Ky.,
here today, 31 to 14. This was the

MICHIGAN FIGHT HO0LD SILLiNOIS
ELEVEN TO ONE TGUCHDOWNl; DUNN,
PLAgYSBRILLIANT GAME FOR VARSI'

THE LINE-UPS.
Michigan Illinois
Cappon ........L.E...... . . Carney
Goetz .........L.T........"Olander
Dunne ........L.G......... 6Smith
Vick .........C...........Depler
Wilson ....... R.G.......... Mohr
Wieman ..'.... R.T......... Ems:
Goebel .......R.E..... Hellstrom
Dunn.. .... .Q.B..... ...Peden
Usher ......!..L.H. Ralph Fletcher
Perrin .....:...R.H...... Walquist
Nelson .... ....B.. .... Crangle
OPEN STAGECRAFT'1
I.ICLAS5 'THURSDAY

This'

Course to Prepare Authors for
Drama Writing in
Future

THOSE DESIRING TO TAKE
WORK SHOULD ENROLL NOW
Classes in stagecraft will be open-
ed Thursday evening, Oct. 28, by a.
meeting from 7 to 8 o'clock at the
Union. Students who have consulted
with Mr. Shuter regarding this
course are requested to call and ar-
range their tuition fee not later than'
Wednesday. If there axe any stu-
dents who have decided to take ad-
vantage of this course and have not
seen Mr. Shuter, it is desired that
they do so at once.
Mr. Shuter will be in his office,
room 308 at, the Union,' from 10:30
until 12:30 o'clock, and from 2:30 to
5 o'clock in the afternoon.r
"The Play's the Thing"
"As Shakespeare said, 'The play's
the thing.' There is a greater de-
mand for good plays today than ever
before. It is true that more plays
have been brought out in New York
in the past few years than it was
thought safe a number of years ago.
It is also a known fact that the
greater majority of these plays were
run into the storehouse after a very
brief life on Broadway. The produc-
ers are constantly crying, 'Give us
more good plays that will stand the
test of time.'
"The college men are looked up as

FAILURE TO BOOT GOAL COS'S
WOLVERINES TIE
GAME
ILLINI SHOULD REPEAT
1919 GRIDIRON VICTOkY
Indian Offense Better Than That of
Yostmen, with Defense
Even
Illinois' powerful eleven nosed out
the Wolverines, 7 to 6, in a game filled
with thrills and good football yes-
terday afternoon on Ferry field. The
failure to ,kick the goal after the
sole Michigan touchdown cost Mich-
igan a tie.
The Illini outplayed the Yost men
throughout the game, particularly on
the offensive. Their touchdown came
as a result of a long steady march
down the field ending with a pretty
forward pass, Walquist to Carney foi
the score.
Jack Dunn was the Wolverine hero
of the contest. Intercepting a pass o
his own 25-yard line, the little quar
terback ran the length of the fiel
for a touchdown. The blocking of the
Michigan interference was the mos
spectacular feature of the whole
game.
Michigan's only other chance for
touchdown was prevented by the
tripping of Johnny Perrin by an Illi-
nois man when, he was well on hii
way to the goal. Although the 11
lini were penalized 15 yards Michi
gan was unable to carry the bal
further. Two attempts to score
from the field were niade by the
Wolverines, both from the 50-yard
line, Dunn missing a drop kick,' by a
small margin, and Steketee faillin
on a place kick.
The injury of Tad Wieman in thi
first quarter weakened the Michigal
line considerably, while the inability
to put Steketee in for the whole
game slowed down the offense. Fo
the most part the Yostmen played
straight football, while the oppa
nents opened up a variety of passe
and trick formations.
Despite the fact that Hellstrom
outpunted Jack Dunn consistently th
first half, the Wolverines managed t
keep the Indians at bay. During th
second half Michigan's kiicking wa
better, but the line began to weaken
under the terrific pounding to whic
it was . subjected by the Illinoi
backs.

(By Associated Press)
Ohio State 13, Wisconsin 7.
Chicago 10, Iowa 0.
Mt. Union 21, Kenyon 7.
East
Harvard 31, Centre 14.
Yale 24, West Virginia 0.
Virginia 7, Rutgers 0 .
Amherst 37, Union 0.
Conn. Wes. 10, Columbia 0.
Army 28, Tufts 6.
Princeton 14, Navy 0.
Cornell 42, Colgate 6.
Virginia M. I. 27, Penn 7.
Syracuse 10, Dartmouth 0.
Georgetown 40, Fordham 16.
Bethany 9, U. of Detroit 6.

first defeat for the Kentucky team in men of novel ideas which will make
four years. ideal plays. As a matter of fact,
Harvard and Centre each drove many of the modern playwrights
over two touchdowns and two goals have written their biggest successes
in the first period, but in the last while still in college.
half the Southern line crumpled be- To Acquaint Writers
fore the dashing attack of the Crim- "The object of the stagecraft course
son backs. is .to acquaint the embryo writers
Captains McMillian of Cefitre, all- with the technique of the play and
American quarter last year, and what constitutes a good play. I am
Horween, of Harvard, were the in- looking forward to big results,". Mr.
dividual stars of the game. Shuter said.
The first class will be for Univer-
Alumni Win Medals in Contest sity men only. There has also been
Dewey Heetderks, '18, and George a number of students desiring in-
Keskey, '19, won bronze medals in a struction in dramatics and dancing
sales contest recently held by the only and do not wish to avail them-
North Bridge Brush company in which selves of the playwriting course
600 salesmen competed. They were alone. Mr. Shuter is trying to ar-
eleventh and twelfth, respectively, in range time to give them the instruc-
the list of medal winners. tion most desired.

A crowd of at least 30,000 swarmed
Ferry field to see the contest.
(Continued on page four)
Telephone to be Put in Library
In accordance with the plan to have
public telephones on the campus a
booth will be installed at the right of
the main entrance of. the Library.

DAILY SUBSCRIPTIONS

Daily subscribers who wish to
pay their subscriptions may
either send checks, or pay same
at The Daily office. The, $4.00
rate will be charged on all un-
paid subscriptions after Nov. 10.

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.4.St
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Meeting

.... .. ,-

At the WHITNEY THEATRE, 7:30 P. M. MONDAY

Varsity Band, Congressman Joseph Fordney (Chairman Ways and Means Committee of House) and Mary L. Van Vliet, Candidate for
ADMISSION FREE Presidential Elector ALL STUDENTS INVrITED

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