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June 01, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-06-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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rIjM £irI sgn ttj
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.'
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
ublication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
dited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second'
s matter.
Subscription by carrier oir mail, $3.50.
9f"lces i Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, g6o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
ure not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
h, and notices of events will be published in Thy Daily at the
cretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to Thle Daily office.
signed communications will receive no consideration.- Noman-
:ript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex.-
!sd in the communications.
What's Going On" notices will not be received after I o'clock
the evening preceding insertion,
EDITORIAL STAFF ,
Telephone 2414
NAGING EDITOR .......--..GEORGE 0. BROPHY JR.
!eEditor............. .. .. Chesser M Campbell
.irma Edor Board..................Lee Woodruff
q.ht Editors- HW Hthok
T. H. Adams !'H.W. Hitchcock
j I. Dakin J. E. McManis
Renaud Sherwood T. W. Sargent, Jr.
day Editor... .... -.......J. A. Bernstein
Editor.. ......B. -P. Campbell
itorials..............T.)J.Whinery, L.A.Kern, S. T Beach
tor s ...............-. . . Robert Angell
en's Editor........... -................M.ary D. Lane
graph..................................Thomas Dewey
,ecp ..... ..... U. R. Mess
Assistants
ephine Wald Frank H. McPike Sidney B. Coates
il G. Weber J. A. Bacon C. T. Pennoyer
'abeth Vickery W. W. Ottaway Marion B. Stahl.
rge Reindel Paul Watzel ILowell S. Kerr
rry B. Grundy Byron Darnton Marion Koch
aces Oberholtzer M. A. K yaverDorothy .Whipple
et E. Adams Walter Donnelly Gerald P. Overton
llace V. Elliott Beata Hksley Edward Lambrecht
hston M.Bain Kathrine Montgomery Sara Wailer
R. U. Howlett

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960

7sIN

't

NESS MANAGER............LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
ising .......,.......... - .......... . .. .D- . - Joyce
eds .... .............................S- Kunstadter
ation ........... ... ------. -----E..... M. Heath
ns......... ... ..E..R.Pi
tion' *' '''''.. ''~''''.......--'.------ -.. . , F. 'Hillery
Assistants
V. Lambrecht M. M. Moule H. C. Hunt
Hamel, Jr. N. W. Robertson M. S. Goldring
J. Hutchinson Thos. . Rice H. W. Heidbreder
'. Cross R. J. Burchell W. Cooley
tL. Davis A. 3. Parker

ence it seems easier to accept the truth - that there
is.,no more reason for discarding aviation because
of its proportionately few accidents than there is
to discard automobiles' because of the Sunday
morning mull of traffic disasters.
It is time that the nation's publicity be put firmly
behind a campaign to get the great transportation
medium of the future in the proper consideration of
American people everywhere. Then we shall think
of such an ambulance disaster as Saturday's only
as an occasion for revising the loading and power
of such planes to provide absolute safety in fu-
ture; we shall .regard the foolish passenger's mis-
take in Uruguay as occasion for legislation to cover
controls in passenger seats ; and we shall pass laws
to prevent stunting over crowds such as caused the
injuries at Milwaukee.
TRUE SPORTSMANSHIP
An important factor in making college contests
the most intense and the most interesting of all
athletic events is the true sportsmanship so inher-
ent in the opposing sides. Last Saturday afternoon
during the game with the Illini, an inspiring in-
stance of this "fair and square" spirit occurred,
which was doubly praiseworthy in view of the keen
rivalry between the two teams, and the closeness
of the score throughout the entire nine innings of
play.:
Each team was fighting. to the utmost of its ca-
pacity .and the slightest mishap or trick of fate was
not unlikely to affect the outcome of the battle. It
was under such conditions that a shower stopped the
game for a few minutes durig Michigan's batting
half of the inning, and when after the rain had
ceased and the player who had not completed his
bat resumed his position at the plate, a question
arose as to the number of strikes which he had. It
was in the midst of this apparently unavailing ar-
gument between the Michigan team and the um-
pire that Coach Lundgren came forth from his
dugout and corrected the arbiter in favor of Mich-
igan.
The spirit of sportsmanship which Coach Lund-
gren displayed at that critical point heightened, if
such a thing is possible, the esteem and respect
which this University holds for him; and it epi-
tomizes the spirit so prevalent and so vital in col-
lege baseball,, the spirit which desires to win the
game if possible, but at all events to "play the
game".,
Now that the class of '24 has been officially dub-
bed "sophomore", wouldn't it be a good idea for its
members to remove that last evidence of verdancy
which still remains, namely, the indelible green
signs which at present mar the campus walks.
"You can't eat your cake and have it" applies
to tramping out the campus grass and then trying
to show visitors what a fine lawn we have, as well
to everyihing else.
Thde Telecope
Disillusioned
We always thought that the Union
Was a democratic institution,
Not catering to class,
Or capital,
Or costume;
But have-you noticed in Article 54
Of the House Rules,
That tickets for dances are given out
"In order of the personal appearance"
We regret the fact that a rhyme from last
month's Gargoyle, which was "contrib'd" by the
wrong L. H. L. was considered by us funny enough
for this column.
We never thought such a thing could possibly
occur, and the Gargoyle should feel immensely en-
couraged for its future.

G

R

A

H

BOTH ENDS

OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

DETROIT U1ITE9 LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jaftkson
(Eastern Standard T l~me)
LimIted and Express cara b eave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. in., 7:05 a. m.,I
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Llmiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:18 a. m. and e'.ery two
hours to 9:48 p. mn. -
Locals to Detroit-5: 55a.m.. 7:00 a.m.
and'every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m.. 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:60 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

J. L. CHAPMAN

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
The Store of Reliability & Satisfaction
118 South Main Street'
ANN ARBOR, . MICHIGAN
hARVARD UNIVERSITY
DENTAL SCHOOL
There is unlimited demand for skilled dent-
fists and specialists in dentistry. This school
ffcrs a most thoroughand efficient training
in this interesting profession. For those who
wish to specialize there are courses in Oral
Sgey, (,rth;dontia (straightening of teeth),
and other branches. Instruction by leading
(;ntists of 1oston and vicinity. t pto-date
uttuipmcunt, ewith unualAopportunities for lrac-
ical work. A college certificate indicating
one year's work in college English, Biology,
Cheistry, as well as high school or college
Physics, required for admission. Write for
)articulars.
EUAENE H. SMITH, D. M. D., Dean
Boston, Iass. ,

h

Sleep AnyplaceBu
Eat at Rex's
THE CLUB LUNCH
712 ARBOR STREET
Near State and Packard

1,

Automobiles for Hirc
IBy Hour or by Trip
REASONABLE PRICES
Cars running to Whitmore Lake
every day
$1.00 Round Trip
Phone 903-M
Not less than five Passengers

191
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2G

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PA

JUNE
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T.
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AS

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1921
S.-
4
1
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25

A BOOK FOR GRADUATION FROM

R. A
J. J.
Y. A
Robt

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A

M1/

'S

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
Jiisac of The Daily should se the night editor, who has full charge
*t all neWs to be printed that night.
- "WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 1921.
Night Editor-BYRON DARNTON.
TOKENS
With Michigan's abundant store of traditions it
is a difficult matter at best .to find a phase of col-
lege life that is not already thoroughly covered by
precedent. On this account, the lot of the average
"infant tradition" is a hard one. Usually it must
displace some custom that was established before
.it, or -fall out,
But now and then a new ceremony is brought
out that so fills a need in our scheme of things that
its acceptance is assured at the outset and we won-
der why no one thought of it sooner. Into this
class falls the custom that was started at the Me-
morial day game, of awarding tokens of apprecia-
tion to the coaches of our athletic teams and the di-
rector of athletics.
Such a program helps better the university spirit
we aie already proud of, by bringing about a closer
relationship between the student body and the men
who produce our teams. In a way these individ-
uals are more than men - for each in his field of
sport symbolizes Michigan. By a better acquaint-
ance with those who have doggedly struggled year
in and year out to place our teams on top, all of
us can more nearly appreciate the fight and deter-
mination that makes true Michigan spirit, and learn
snore easily how to practice it.
In addition the occasion gave us oppdrtunty to
show we are behind the coaches in what they are
doing in our behalf. The gifts show tangibly what
otherwise might remain unexpressed through lack
of a, proper medium. They bring home to the
coaches, perhaps as no other way might, the per-
sonal interest we have in their work.
ACCIDENTS AND AVIATION
Seven men, some nationally known, died when a
great ambulance plane crashed . near Washington
last Saturday. The same editions which reported
this catastrophe told also of a Uruguayan passen-
ger who lost his life when he touched the pilot's
controls during a loop and brought his plane- to a
crash near Montevideo; and also of sixteen per-
sons who were injured when a stunting airplane
fell into a grandstand at Milwaukee.
The' chorus of "I told you so's" which followed
America's reading of these accidents will never be
counted. Not only the grandmothers, but perfectly
sane and nervy men and women everywhere
.doubtless asked themselves whether the game be
worth the candle. Many, in their own minds, reg-
..s tered ran emphatic "No l" Few in all likelihood
looked at the matter constructively, seeing what
--effect the experience of the three accidents should
'have on the future of aviation; and probably no
great number actually took the trouble to balance
up the small number of accidents against the long
grind of successful flights; valuable developments,
and important services performed by airplanes
everywhere.
Aviation will not be stopped, though it can be
retarded, by such reports and such an attitude. If
the American people had a. real conception of this
great industry of the future we would not be lag-
ging behind nationally in its development. Every
man or woman who takes a first ride in the skies

We Clean, Bleach and Block
Panamas, etc., into the Late
Shapes, with all new tr immings
to look just like new. We don't
use any acids and do only High
Class Work. Factory Hat Store,
617 Packard St. Phone 1792.
Chop Suey
Will remain open
all summer
Q~ang Tr,.; Lo
613 Iberty St. E
61 6 b r y a r C o l l e g e )H e n
Wanted
Big business opportunity this
Summer with chance for con-
tract upon graduation offered,
to inen with sales ability.
-IF you want to make money
this summer-
-IF you want to become asso-
ciated with some of the most
brilliant, active minds in busi-
hess-
-IF you want to be identified
with one of the most interesting
businesses of all times-
-IF you want to put yourself
in line now for a position of
great opportunity in the largest
house of its kind in America-
-IF you want to qualify NOW
for a CONTRACT upon grgdua-
tion at a good salary with this
house
ANSWER THIS
ADVERTISEMENT
TOD)AY 1
Men of the calibre we want can.
meet all classes of people on
their own level. They must be
mnen's men-good workers, team
players, broad gauged, and
above all ambitious.
Qualifying applicants will be as-
§igned one of two methods of
selling. You take your choice.
You may work alone. Or you
will be assigned to a travelling
organization under one of the
most successful salesmen 14 this
field in the United States.
Get all details about the, high
salaried positions given under
generous contracts at the end of
the season to the men with the
'best records. (Note: These con-
tracts will not interfere with
the completion of your course,
but will be effective upon grad-
uation.)
Write
College Salesmen's Department
Dept. 1.%
INTERNATIONAL
MAGAZINE COMPANY
119 West 40th Street
New York City

I

CHINESE - JA PANESE and
Other Foreign Students
SECURE RESERVATIONS ON YOUR FAVORITE
STEAMISHIP LINE
FROM
W. F. KELLER
402 National Bank BuildingCTelephone 808
ANN .ARBOR, MICH.

s

IAMts EIELERS L.ATni
I ~ g~E R A14 RIE

THE NEWER WEDDING RING

Wedding rings, like other jewelry, are changing in style.
While the narrow plain band of pure gold is still the mnainstay,
many are now using .the carved design in white gold and
platinum.
Plain Bands at $3.50 up
Carved at $7.50-$45.00

I

Set kith 5 Diamonds in Platinum, $60.00
SCHLANDERER & SEYFRIED

113 EAST LIBERTY ST.

ANN ARBOR

Quoth Eppie Taff:
He picked some berries in the woods
And thought that they were currant,
So Heinrich Hendricks ate a few,
And soon found out they weren't.

Did you ever hear the story of the father who
was lamenting the fact that he had spent seven
thousand dollars to send his son to college and all
he got was a quarterback?
Another Pressing Engagement
My one good suit is always pressed,
When calling at her door,
But when we're in the parlor, then
I press my suit some more.
Stolen Thunder
b Campus reporter-I ascribe this statement to a
person of first importance in university affairs.
Editor-Why not mention his name ?
Campus reporter-I'm too modest.
-Purple Parrot.
News Miscues
In speaking of a minster, our own Daily starts
out in the following manner: "Despite the efforts
of the congregation to retain him by planning to
remodel the church", etc.
Evidently the congregation is sealing the win-
dows and barring the doors.
Famous Closing Lines
"Hard luck," cried the quoit plaver as a horse-

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Chinese Garden
Most Popular Restaurant in the City
YOUR CHOICE OF
AMERICAN AND CHINESE COOKING
SPECIAL MENUS FOR SUNDAY AND DURING
COMMENCEMENT

Bring Your Guests

AMERICAN MANAGEMENT

#-

106 SOUTH MAIN $T.

UP STAIRS

"GET THE HABIT"

----Noon=

COLLEGE

END

SALE

Now is your time to buy your
Graduation Gifts
DARLING & MALLEA UX
224 - 226 S. State Street 7 Nickels

.,

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