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June 01, 1921 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-06-01

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N

.ATHER
WERS AND
TODAY

Vi~Sir

Iat

ASSOC IATEl
PRESS
JDASI ATNI I 11
SERVICE

. No. 171.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 1921.

PRICE FIV

ERIMAN DEFENSE
FORCES PREPARED
FOR DIRM NT
ENERAL VON HOEFER ASSERTS
READINESS OF ARMIES *
TO DISBAND
AYS PURPOSE WAS
ONLY TO KEEP ORDER
roops Did Effective Work in Prevent-
ing More Serious Struggle,
Claim
(By Associated Press)
Ober-Glogau, Upper Silesia, May 31.

Voynich 's Roger Bacon Manuscript
To Be Explained By Newbold Today

Prof. William Romaine Newbold of
the philosophy department of the-
-University of Pennsylvania will ex-
plain "The Voynich Roger Bacon
Manuscript" in a lecture to be given
at 4:15 o'clock Thursday afternoon in
Natural Science auditorium. The
manuscript, part of which was deci-
phered by Professor Newbold him-
self, is important because if it can be
rightfully attributed to Roger Bacon
it proves that he used a telescope and
FACULTY CONSIDERS
ENRNEkHNE

-German defense organizations in Failures of First Year Men Were Also

this city and in other towns west of
the Oder river will disarm and dis-
band as soon as inter-allied authority
has been re-established in Upper Sil-
esia, said General von Hoefer, com-
mander of German guards in this city,
yesterday. He added that the allies
should be thankful that the Germans
had "organized these men and had
maintained order, instead of trying to
disarm and disband the defense troops
at' this critical time."
"We do not want to keep Ithese men'
under arms a minute longer than ne-
cessary," he went on, "but we must
protect ourselves." _
General von Hoefer is considered
the strongest German personality in
Silesia. He is credited with having es-
tablished discipline among the defense
forces gathered along the Oder, but
many of the men he has disarnied and'
others who came here from Germany,
were sent back. General von Hoefer
has repeatedly prevented the Ger-
mans from stairting a general advance
rising one morning at 4 o'clock to
send orders to Germans already under
way toward the Oder to turh back.
JUNIOR ENGINEERS
ELECT COUNCILMEN
Eugene Harbeck, '22E, was elect-
ed to the Student council over Mil-
ton Goetz, '22E, in the balloting at
the junior engineering class meeting
yesterday morning. Harbeck polled 64
votes against 51 for Goetz. The class
balloting was made necessary as the
result of the tie which existed at the
end of the recent All-campus elec-
tion.
Proof on the class directory which
was posted in the room of the Engi-
neering society for correction has
been lost and another proof will be
posted in the office of the Technic
this morning. This must be attended
to immediately in order to get the
booklet out in time, it is announced.
Copies of the directory will be mail-
ed to all members of the class who
have paid their dues. The directory
includes the names, -nicknames, home
addresses and local addresses of all
members of the class.
V. F. W. PLAN FIRST ANNUAL
BANQUET AT ARMORY TONIGHT
In order to bid farewell to those
seniors "of 'the organization who are
leaving school this yqar, the Veterans
of Foreign Wars will hold their first
annual banquet at the Armory at 6:30
o'clock Thursday evening. Several
speakers of prominence in the organ-
ization will address those present.
After the banquet there will be a
business meeting at which all re-
maining business will be transacted
and plans made for the work of next
year.
Tickets for the banquet may be pur-
chased from N. K. Chamberlain,, '22E;
W. D. Gilbert, '22E, J. R. Rowe, '23,
or J. P. Lawton, '24.

Discussed at Meeting
Yesterday

SUGGEST REQUIREMENT OF MORE
THAN ONE CONTINUATION STUDI
Freshmen failu'res at the University
of Michigan, together with a proposed
revision of entrance requirements,
were the topics of discussion at the
meeting of the faculty yesterday aft-
ernoon. For some time a special
committee of the faculty has been se-
curing information on which to base
a revision of the present entrance re-
quirements, and this information, to-
gether with numerous recommenda-
tions and suggestions, was presented
to the faculty in a report by the com-
mittee.
Change Necessary
Freshmen failures at the University
make ncessary some change in the
present system it is thought, and as a
result of information gathered from
other institutions throughout the
country the committee feels its sug-
gestions will povide a satisfactory
remedy. The entire subject of fresh-
men failures was goneover by the fac-
ulty-yesterday afternoon and the pre-
liminary report of the committee read,
but several more conferences will be
necessary before any faculty action
may betaken.
Specific proposed requirements for
admission to the various colleges of
the .University were presented to the
faculty yesterday afternoon following
approval by President Maion L Bur-
ton and the deans. Criticism a d sug-
gestion in regard to changes w re ask-
ed for by the committee in charge.
The matter will come up before the'
faculty for discussion and adoption
early next fall.
Co-ordination Advocated
Closer co-ordination between high
schools and the University is advocat-
ed by the faculty committee on fresh-
men failures and revision of entrance
requirements. Among the recommend-
ations made by the committee yester-~
day afternoon were those jn regard to
continuation studies. These studies
are defined by' the committee as cours-
es demanding as a pre-requisite a
preparation equivalent to the units'
accepted i1 that subject for admission.
The committee advocates that at least
one of the major subjects of high
school study other than English must
be pursued throughout the freshman
year as a continuation 'study; that
English shall be continued in the
freshman year in the University either
as rhetoric I or II, depending upon
whether three or four units of Eng-
lish with composition are offered for
admission; that when two or more
units are offered in Greek, Latin,
French, German, Spanish, history, or
Mathematics, or one or more units in
chemistry or physics, the work done
in these subjedts must be of such a
character as'to pernsit the student to
pursue them in the University as con-;
tinuation studies; and that no course
which is a repetition of a unit ac-
Continued on Page Eight)

manyt other modern scientific appli-.
ances.
The names of the preceding own-
ers of the Roger Bacon manuscript,
which was purchased by Wilfred
Voynic" of London in 1912,, remain a
riystery. However a contemporary
courtier is said to have related that
Emperor Rudolph of Russia reward-
ed a messenger lavishly for carrying
the manuscript to him.
After some research work Mr. Voy-
nich came to the conclusion'that the
prominent mathematician and confi-
dential agent of Queen Elizabeth, Dr.
John Dee, brought this cipher man-
uscript to the Emperor of Russia
about 1580. Mr. Voynich is also of
the opinon that thanks to Mr. Dee
many of the works of Roger Bacon
have reached us and he has suggest-
ed that further investigation into the
archives of Queen Elizabeth may
throw new light upon the.identity of
the immediate pupils of Roger Ba-
con.
In his, lecture Professor Newbold
will explain why he attributes the
manuscript to Bacon and he will in-
dicate the importance of Bacon's dis-
coveries to the medical and physical
sciences. By the use of slides he will
exhibit on the screen the drawings
found in the manuscript.
FINAL CHACGIEWR
VETERANS TO GET BONUS
BLANKS MAY BE SECURED FROM
11 TO 12:30 O'CLOCK
TODAY
War veterans now attending the
University will be offered their last
opportunity to secure bonus blanks
through the University organizations
from 11 to 12:30 o'clock this morn-
ing,' when W. V. Gilbert, '22E, rep-
resenting the V. F. W., will be at the
R. 0. T. C. office on the campus to
receive applications. Nearly 600 men
have already signed up and thosein
charge of the plan desire to complete
the work immediately because of the
labor involved in sending to the ad-
jutant-general's office for the blanks
and supervising their distribution
here.
The forms for those who have al-
ready signed up, at the office are ex-
pected tomorrow, according to Gil-
bert, and the men who -appear at the
office this morning can probably se-
cure theirs within a few days. The
reason that it is necessary to de-
mand individual signatures! is that
several different forms are provided
by the district office and the exact
number of each type to be used is re-
quired before they will be mailed to
Ann Arbor.
Men are urged to secure their dis-
charge papers as soon as possible in
order to have them an hand at the
time when their blanks arrive.
PROF. F. N. SCOTT NAMED
AS CO-OPERATING EDITOR
Three co-operating edtors to as-
sist the secretary of the American
Association of University trofessors
in the work of editing 'the Bulletin
of the association haveFbeen appoint-
ed. They are: Prof. F. N. Scott, of
the University of Michigan, Prof.
Stuart P. Sherman, of the University
of Illinois, and Prof. A. L. Wheeler,
of Bryn :Mawr college.
SENIOR MEETING POSTPONTD
UNTIL TOMORROW AFTERNOON

Because of the small attendance,
the meeting of the senior literary
class which was to have been held
yesterday was postponed until 4
Q'clock tomorrow afternoon in room
205, Mason hall. .{

MASQUES PLAY T
WHITNY 'TOIGHT
All Rough Spots Polished Off at Last
Rehearsal Held Tuesday
Night
CAST INCLUDES ACTORS WELL
FITTED TO PARTS PORTRAYED
"The Importanc of Being Earnest",
by Oscar Wilde, will be presented by
Masques, women's dranatic organi-
zation, at 8:15 o'clock tonight, at the
Whitney theater. Tickets will be on
sale to both men and women at the
box office today. Many good seats are
yet available.
The dress rehearsal' last night with
attention to minutest details of busi-
ness and costuming was highly suc-
cessful, according to Prof. J. Raleigh
Nelson, director.-
Cast Fits PartsI
"The cast was selected with re-
gard to special fitness to the parts
taken and great development has been
noticed as to artistic finish in each
role," is Professor Nelson's com-
ment, "and the play itself has proven
most adaptable to our presentation,
and contains many clever situations.
"We spent the entire day yester-f
day in arranging the setsof scenery
for each act painted by 0. C. Davis of
Detroit. The effects are even better
than we had anticipated," said the di-
rector.
Cast Pictures Displayed I
Pictures are on display in Graham's
window of members of the cast, who
are as follows: Isabel Kemp, '22,
John Worthing, J. P.; Christine l9ur-
kett, '22, Algernon Moncrieff; Mil-
dred Trick,.'22, Lady Bracknell; Mary
Ives, '23, Hon. Gwendolen Fairfax;
Joyce McCurdy, '22, Cecily Cardew;
Jeanne McPherson, '21, Miss Prism;
Margaret Reineke, '23, Merriman; Is-
abel Swan, '22, Lane; and Lesse Gay-
lord, '23, Rev. Canon Chasuble, D.D.
Tile. high school orchestra of 20
pieces will furnish the music during
the progrgm.
FUNERAL SERVICES HELD FOR
MIS. ROBERT PATTERSON'
Funeral services for Mrs. Robert
Rowley Patterson, who died at 6:25
Sunday afternoon, were held yester-
day morning at the Patterson resi-
dence, 2g11 Hill street, and interment
was made the same afternoon in
Grand Rapids.
Mrs. Patterson was the wife of
Prof. G. W. Patterson's youngest son,
Robert Rowley 'Patterson, the mar-
riage having been solemnized on
June 12 of last year.
Before her marriage she was Eliza-
beth Louise Palin of Grand Rapids.
She was a gradate of the Central
high school and afterward attended
Sweet Briar college, Virginia. During
the war she served on the seretarial
staff of Sen. William Alden Smith in
Washington.
The death came very suddenly, fol-
lowing illness of only a few days.
Mrs. Patterson is survived by herf
husband, her father had mother, Dr.
and John H. Palin of Grand Rapids,
and a brother, Milburn Palin.
SPAINE WILL ADDRESS MEN'S q
EDUCATIONAL CLUB TONIGHT

C. L. Spaine, deputy superintendent'
of schools in Detroit, will speak be-
fore the Men's Educational club at
7:30 o'clock tonight in room 304 ofs
the Union. Mr. Spaine has chosen as
his topic, "New Phases of City Edu-
cational Work" and is expected to
make reference to the platoon system
as it is being worked out in Detroit
at the present time.

RUTH'S FIFTEENTH HOMER
SETS NEW MAJOR RECORD
IWashington, May 31.-Babe
made his 15th home run of the
season here today In the game
with Washington. The hit was
made In the ninth with two men
on bases.
A new major league record
was set by today's home run,
which was the 118th the Yankee
slugger has made during his
major league career. The form.
er record, 117, was held by C.
G. Cravathy formerly of the Phil.
adelphia Nationals.
. e
Graduation Series
RecitalI omorrow
Buy M'iss Rominger
(By S. B. C.)
Another recital in the graduation
series will be given by Alice Evelyn
Rominger, School ' of Music, at 8
o'clock tomorrow evening at the
school. These recitals are a regular
part of the requirements for gradua-
tion and are prepared in such a way
as to make them well worth while.
Miss Rominger, a soprano,. is a pu-
pil of William Wheeler and will be
assisted by Frank Bishop, a pianist
from Almont, Mich.,-
The complete program by Miss Rom-
inger and Mr. Bishop is as follows:
Voi che sapete ......Mozart
Alice Evelyn Rominger
Fantasie Op. 49..............Chopin
Frank Bishop
Faith in Spring, Ave Maria, The
Secret, Margaret at the Spin-
ning Wheelr............Schubert
Miss Rominger
Prelude in C Minor. Edward Bredshall
Etude in. D flat..... .......Liszt
La Campanella........Paganini-Liszt
Mr. Bishop
The Soldier's Betrothed, Broken
Blossom, Collette, Dream of
an Eve..'..........Chaminade
Miss Rominger .
E -SEN.BEVERIBBE'WILL
SPED WEKEDMERE

400 MILLIUNS Cl
FR.OM RAIL WAG
BY OARDOuRI
DECISION BY NATIONAL RAII
LABOR BODY EFFECTIV
J UhY 1

31 LABOR GROUPS A
104 ROADS AFFE

uA J

Red.uctions Will Average 12 Per Ce
Attitude of Brotherhoods
Undetermined
Chicago, May 31.,-An estima
$400,000,000 will be cut from thei
tion's railway wage bill when an or
reducing wages an average of 12
cent to be handed down tomorrow
the United States railroad labor boa
becomes effective July 1. The or
affects members of' 31 labor org
izations, employed on 104 railrads.
While the decrease is specfica
applied only to the roads whose ca
have been heard by the board, the s
cision says it may later be applied
any other road asking a hearing 1
der the provision of the sch-Cu
mins transportation act.
Reductions Computed
Percentages of reductions. compu
by members of the board, gave the
erage of 12 per cent, and the sA
board estimated the annual reduct
In wages at approximately $400,0(
000.
The decision grants reductions va
ing from 5 to 13 cents an hour
from 5 to 18 per cent and in the ci
of section laborers, completely wij
out the increase granted by the $64
000,000 wage' award of July 20, 1
Switchmen and shopcraft were gi
a nine per cent reduction while
train service men were cut appr
,bately seven per cept. Car repair
were cut about ten per cent.
Roads Claim Slump
The attitude of the railway uni4
towards the decrease ordered rema
to be determined. The great lire
erhoodsare expected to meet h
July 1 to consider the' board's decis
winter slump in business, railr(
Claiming they were hard hit by
winter slump in buisness, railri
managements have been clamoring
several months for lower wages, o
the decision tomorrow wil mark
first relief granted by the board si
it set the exact scale more. than
months ago.
CERCLE FR ANCAIS
INITIATES TONIGH
"More elaborate plans than e
formulated before are being made
the Cercle Francais for the ann
initiation banquet which will be l
at 6:30 o'clock tonight in room 319
the Union.
William G. Sharpe, '22, will be to
master at the dinner and will welco
25 new members. Other speakefs v
be Prof. Arthur G. Canfield, head
the romance languages departnie
Prof. Rene Talamon, and Jean l
pet, director of the Cercle. #3.
Field, '21, will reply for the initial
SENIOR LITS MUST PAY lUES
BEFORE FRIDAY AFTERNO
Senior lits are expected to pay t
dues before the end of this week,
cording to J. E. McManis, class tre
urer. Dues may be paid at the bq
in the corridor of University il f
2 to 4 o'clock Thursday and Frid
Architects Elect to Connecl Toda
Students of the Architectural
loge will meet at 3 o'clock this ai
noon in room 311 of the Engineer
building to cast their votes for $
dent councilmen from that dep
ment.

STATESMAN TO DELIVER
ADDRESSES DURING
STAYr

TWO

Ex-Senator Albert J. ,Beveridge
will be in Ann Arbor next Saturday,
Sunday, and Monday as the guest of
Prof. T. C. Trueblood, of the public
speaking department, and during his.
visit will make two addresses under
the auspices of the Wesleyan guild
of the Methodist church.
On Sunday evening Senator' Bever-r
ioge will speak at the Methodist1
church on the topic, "The Bible as
Good Reading", an address which he
has made in different parts of the
country on numerous occasions and1
one which has met with a great deal1
of favor.
At 4 q'clock Monday afternoon he
will speak before the members of theJ
Oratorical association in Hill audi-
torium on. some phases of public
~speaking.
Senator Beveridge is distinguished
as a writer, statesman, and histor-
ian, his work entitled "The Life of
John Marshall" being considered one
of the best books of itq kind recent-,
1ly published. In speaking of Senator
Beveridge Professor Trueblood re-
marked that he was as fine a public
speaker as has been in Ann' Arbor for
many years.
The senator Wmes to this city from
Flint, where he is scheduled to ad-
dress the -State Bar association Sat-r
urday afternoon. Both of his talks in
this city will be open to the public.

,., ._. ,,
#

''

H

T

MASQUES' ANNUAL PLAY
"The Importance of Being Earnest"
Under Direction of Prof. J. RALEIGE NELSON

8:15"

Tickets: $1.50, 1.00 and 50c

AT

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