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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 23, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

t Ir 4Ufl~

ut

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE Ar>SOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exci sively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the loc l news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Isnn Arbor, Michigan, as second
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960 ; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be rfteived after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion,
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephoiw 2414
MANAGING EDITOR............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editorr.............................Chesser M. Campbell.
Nfight Editors-
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J. I. Dakin TI. XW. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor ........................ ...... . A. Bernstein
Editorials.............Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, T. J. Whinery
Assistant News...............................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sports...................................... Robert Angell
Women's Editor................. .............Mary D. Lane
Telegraph......................................West Gallogly
Telescope......... .............................Jack W . Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Frances Oberh6ltzer L. Armstrong Kern
Paul G. Weber Robert E. Adams Hughston McBain
Almena Barlow Norman C. Damon Frank H. McPike
Elizabeth Vickery Byron Darnt m Gerald P. Overton
G. E. Clark Thomas E. Dcwey Edward Lambrecht
George Reindel Wallace F,. Elliott William H. Riley Jr.
Dorothy Monfort Leo J. Hershdorfer Sara Waller
Harry B. Grundy
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER..........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising............................D. P. Joyce
Classifieds.........................................Robt. O. Kerr
Publication.......... .......................F. M. Heath
Accounts ........................................E. R. Priehs
Circulation......................................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross IR. C Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Tho. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard . M. Moule D. G. Slawson
J. J. Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth

J.r; . .. . ........

The night editors for the week will be as fol-
lows: Monday night, Jack Dakin; Tuesday night,
Thornton Sargent ; Wednesday night, Brewster
Campbell; Thursday night, Hugh Hitchcock; Fri-
day night, Thomas Adams; Saturday night, John
McManis.
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1920.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
The Medical School, the firs professional col-
lege in the University, opened for students in
1850. In 1890 a combined curriculum covering
six years of work was introduced which carried
with it the granting of two degrees, B. S. and
M. D.
WELCOME, ILLINOIS!
Our rivals are here! Represented by team and
rooters, Illinois awaits the sound of the opening
whistle for a contest which will almost inevitably
eliminate a championship contender. We wel-
come you, men of Illinois ! As members of a fel-
low university and opponents in the college ath-
letic world we hope that you will find enjoyment
in what Ann Arbor has to offer, and that your
impressions of our student life will be pleasant
ones.
Harboring the same ambition and cherishing the
same goal, our two elevens clash this afternoon,
and one of us must be overthrown before the other
can stride on the supremacy of the big ten. You
come confident from last year's triumphs and the
mastery of one vaunted aspirant in this year's race.
We are not lack Nhg in faith, for we also believe that
our team has the fight which spells victory.
That you are formidable only increases the re-
wards of success. We welcome you, Illinois, and
the test you bring!
"Y" EXTENSION
When the interested outsider comes to Ann Ar-
bor to witness an athletic contest, he is quite apt
to find himself confronted, if we score a victory,
with what to the uninitiated may seem an appar-
ently lawless spirit of rowdyism. Those who know
human nature are aware that such happenings sim-
ply mean that healthy young instincts, bottled up
for days in expectation of the great event, sud-
denly have burst forth on the final news of the out-
come. All this celebration is a matter of a few
hours at the most, and the next day will disclose
the fact that the participants are students who
know perfectly well they have work to do, and are
doing it.
But if the matter is not explained, it may leave a
poor impression in the mind of the father or
mother of a prospective Michigan student. It is
to overcome this very attitude which outsiders,
through chance visits or unauthoritative news
stories, may have gained of Michigan, that the Y.
M. C. A. extension service is planning to begin an-
other year's work among the towns and cities of
Michigan. The aim of the work is to spread the
gospel of Michigan, to show people that there is
a fundamental spirit of clean living and friendship
here which is more deep-seated than the excre-
scences which sometimes show themselves on the
surface, and more especially to point out to the

high school youth what the University offers him.
College men can influence the high school boy
as nothing else can, and the "Y" extension wants
the right kind of men for the job. Volunteers are
being sought among real Michigan men, who will
go through a short period of training and later be-
gin making speaking tours to surrounding towns.
This is a real and worth-while service to the Uni-
versity, and one in which loyalty can prove itself
in practical achievement.
LEAVING GAMES EARLY
Fifteen thousand people would be much obliged
if students leaving the south stand of Ferry field
before the game is over would make use of the
stairways in each section. At the Case and M.
A. C. games persons were tramping across the en-
tire front of the stand all during the fourth quar-
ter. This is very annoying to all spectators, but
particularly to those on the lower rows who are
prevented from a clear view of the field.
It is assumed that those who leave early do so
not on account of disloyalty, but because they have
business that must be attended to. They should
make it a point to cause others as little annoyance
as possible.
ALUMNI AND THE UNION PLAN
Michigan alumni all over the country have been
most liberal in their donations which have made
possible the building of the Michigan Union, and
it was entirely through their generosity that the
Union officials were enabled to bring to the cam-
pus a realization of the New Union project.
But the Union is still incomplete in some re-
spects. The reading room, swimming pool, and
other features of the building remain to be fin-
ished, more lights are to be installed on either side
of the entrance, and there is an infinite amount of
interior decorating still to be done. Moreover,
there are plans now under consideration for the
enlarging of the tap room which, in its short year
of service, has already become too small to fulfill
the service constantly demanded of it.
All these things require money, and the Union
has already gone in debt $39o,ooo in order to bring
the building to its present state of completion.
This debt still stands, and it is easy to realize how
difficult any plan of entirely completing the build-
ing is made with this aniount hanging fire. But the
Union is not now campaigning for more funds; if
all donations of alumni were paid, both those which
have already, fallen due and those which have not,
the debt would be entirely wiped off the Union
slato and the institution would have some small
amount remaining. It would then be possible to
assume a small debt for the purpose of further
improvements on the building.
Let's talk up a "finish the Union" campaign.
The Telescope
Our Daily Novelette
I
The man stood in front of the Carnegie library,
his eyes riveted on the building, his face lighted
by a look of rapt adoration. He was dressed in
clothes of last year's model and occasionally he
brushed a faded and well worn sleeve across his
eyes.
II
Could it be, I wondered, that beneath this rough
exterior beat a-heart which ardently longed for
knowledge? Surprised at his visible agitation, my
curiosity got the better of me and I asked him the
cause of his emotion. Pointing dramatically to the
building he said, "Do you know, there's not a day
in my life that I do not stop in front of this build-
ing and offer inward thanks for such a man as
Carnegie, who has made this institution possible."
III
Genuinely touched, I realized that I was face to
face with a man who held the priceless boon of
knowledge far above earthly things. And then,

awkwardly, I voiced the question which had been
troubling me.
"You surprise me," I said. "You do not strike
me as the sort of man who holds such a high re-
gard for books."
I realized at once that I had wounded his feel-
ings. A slight flush mantled his cheek as he drew
himself up proudly. His voice was scornful as he
answered:
"I'm not, but you see my wife has a job in this
here building scrubbing floors, and if it wasn't for
that I don't see how the family could get along un-
less I went to work myself."
Epitaph
Pause, stranger, offer up a prayer
For poor old Sammy Knott,
He couldn't see why he should wear
A silly freshman pot.

(Two Stores)

Both

Ends of the

Diagonal Walk

C12AHAM

f

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect June 15, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:10 a. m. and hourly to
9: 10 p. Mn.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. n. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and eery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m. and 1:10 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

I

WINDOW SHADES

PICTURE FRAMING

Student Headquarters
We carry complete stocks of "Brighten-Up" finishes in small size
cans for all "touch-up" jobs around the house.
PAINTS VARNISHES BRUSHES WALL PAPER
ENAMELS RALCIMINES STAINS GLASS

Le E. WENZEL

OCTOBER
S M T W T

Painting and Decorating

F
1

S
2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
30
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

I PHONE 84

207 EAST LIBERTY ST.

I

I DONALDSON'S II

SPECIAL

Particularly
Sfor Students

Imported Ribbed Wool
Hose
$1.15 per pair6 for $6.50
usual price $1.50

GRAHAM

The Great
Interchangeable
Type
Writing Machine

All Business, All Sciences, All Languages.
may be had on ONE machine.
^1 ; different arrangements of type and lan-
guas;,s, including Greek, Ar-nenian, Chinese
Ph .netic, and all modern Enropean languages;
also, type set for Engineering, Chemistry, As-
tronomy, Mathematics, etc.
Lectures, Notes, Theses, may be most beau-
tifully and clearly transcribed on the Multi-
plex in condensed type.
Monthly payments. Good rebuilt machines.
Machines rented.
Detroit Office - 154 Wavne Street
THE HAMMOND TYPEWRITEReCO.
545 East 69th Street New York City
:11111111111111111111111111111 111111111I1111-.
SHallo ween
At Dexter
=PHIL DIAMO"ND
And His Orchestra
Wed. Oct. 27
Decorations alone
s worth seeing
Good time assured
to all =
)N

711 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.
I -

Up the

Stair s

in Nickel's Arcade

TO THE

Arcade Cafeteria

Where you may select your meal from
a forty-foot table steaming with a va-
riety of all kinds of pure food delicious-
ly cooked by experts. Bakery goods
fresh from our own ovens.
Our Special Blend of Coffee with Jer-
sey cream is exceptional.
Economy of Cafeteria service ena-
bles us to serve at low prices.

A SMALL
MATTER

C. J. FINGERLE.

sometimes kindles a Big Fire.
Books, Clothing and other fur-
nishings are costly and if de-

A Tip to Coach Zuppke
After the game a light lunch or hot
revive you.-Daily ad.

waffles will

stroyed must be replaced.

In-

Dear Noah:
I am writing a book which I intend to entitle
"The Fusser's Paradise." Can you suggest an ap-
propriate design ofr the cover?
Awthur.
Why not a picture of the new library?
Famous Closing Lines
"Ha, his Union suit," he muttered as he saw the
doorman in livery.
NOAH COUNT.

surance is very, very cheap and
there is the 'satisfaction of be-

ing potected. Call

Dinner 11:30 to 1 P. M.

BUTLER
INSURANCE
Phone 401 M
National Bank Building
JOSEPH PEILEN, SOLICITOR

Supper 5:30 to 7 P.M.

mi i' i ui e i - 1

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