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October 23, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR; SOMEWHAT
Co LER TODAY

VOTOW Abp Ap
MW
t r tgan

4,

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT IVIRE
SERVICE

I

I

I

VOL. XXXI. No. 17. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

NEW YORK MAYOR
READY TO SUSPEND
ALL PUBLIC WORK
WISHES TO DISCOVED IF THERE
IS OPEN COMPETITION
IN BIDDING
DECLARES PEOPLE ARE
NOW ROBBED BY TRUSTS
Legislative Committee Proposes Let.
ter to Be Sent to Governor
Smith
(By Associated Press)
New York, Oct. 22.-New York is
ready to suspend all public work un-
til it is learned if there "is open com-
petition in bidding for the work."
This announceemnt was made late
today by Mayor Hylan when the
joint legislative committee adjourn-
ed until Nov. 4 after its counsel had
asserted "it had only scratched the
surface in its investigation of the
building trust."
Developments in the building situ-
ation came in a dramatic fashion this
afternoon after Mayor Hylan had ad-
dressed the board of estimate de-
claring that the building trust, the
coal trust and other trusts have built
a wall around New York greater than
the great wall of China."
Rescind Contracts
While the legislative committee was
quizzing witnesses in one chamber of
the city hall the board of estimates,
meeting in another, rescinded four
contracts involving nearly $7,000,000
worth of work on the New York]
county's proposed court house.
The mayor also authorized an in-
vestigation of all transactions for
school houses.
"I want the people to know that
they will be protected against the
men who are, seeking by means of
combinations and unfair practices to
mulct the people," explained the
mayor.
Extortion Charged
Samuel Untermyer, counsel for the
legislative committee, declared that
a widespread system of extortion was
being practiced by unscrupulous la-
bor leaders to obtain vast sums of
money from employers under the
threat of calling strikes or actually
doing so.
The legislative committee has pre-
pared a letter to be forwarded at once
to Governor Smith requesting him to
designate Attorney General Nutton as
proecutor in connection with the in-
quiry.
HOBBS, PHILLIPS
WRITE FOR DAILY
Interest is already being manifest-
ed in the Political Sunday supplement
of The Daily, which is to be issued
Oct. 31. Prof. W. H. Hobbs, of the
geology department, who is now
supplying the Detroit Free Press
with a series of political articles, will
contribute an article giving his opin-
ions on the political issues of the
day. Prof. U. B. Phillips, of the his-
tory department, is also to write on
some pertinent facts relative to na-
tional politics.

Students on the campus are taking
an active part in the campaign this
fall and have signified their inten-
tions to contribute to this supple-
ment.
Collins Declines '23 Dent Nomination
Because- of other student activities
I hereby decline the nomination for

As They

Farce

Each Other

MICHIGAN
F.B.
Nelson
R.H.
Perrin
Q.B.
Dunn
R.T. R.G. C.
Wieman Wilson Vick

WOLVERINES
AWAIT ILLINI

L.H.
Usher

R.E.
Goebel
Carney
L.E.

L.G.
Dunne

L.T.
Goetz

L.E
Cappon
Hellstrom
R.E.

Olander
L.T.

Smith Depler
L.G. C.
Bob Fletcher
Q.B.

Mohr Ems
R.G. R.T.

Peden or Ralph Fletcher
L.H.

Walquist
R.H.

Crangle
F.B.
ILLINOIS
THREE FIRES OCCUR IN UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS
WITHIN PAST TWO DAYS; TWO START IN DESKS

CONFLAGRATIONS UNEXPLAINED;
NIGHT WATCH ON CAMPUS
INCREASED
Three fires, all of origin unknown
and two of which have started in
desks, have occurred in University
buildings within the past two days.
The firstwas a small blaze in one
of the exhibition rooms of the Zoo-
logical museum, was discovered and
extinguished within a short time on
Thursday.
Yesterday morning at 11 o'clock it
FIVE CONFERENCE GRID0
OUTFITS FTER TITLE
MICHIGAN-ILLINOIS. WISCONSIN-
OHIO GAMES TODAY MOST
IMPORTANT
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Oct. 22.-Five undefeated
conference elevens are among the
six teams which will meet tomorrow
in the race for the Big Ten cham-
pionship.
Wisconsin plays Ohio State's last
year's runner up at Columbus; Illi-
nois title winner in 1919 meets Mich-
igan at Ann Arbor, and Iowa, defeat-
ed by Illinois last Saturday after
winning from Indiana earlier in the
season, meets Chicago here.
The Illinois-Michigan and the
Wisconsin-Ohio contests are general-
ly considered the most important of
the day for all four are considered of
championship calibre with little to
choose between them. Victory for Il-
linois and Wisconsin or Ohio State
would practically eliminate the de-
feated teams from the race, while de-
feat of Illinois by Michigan would
tighten the race for Illinois is looked
upon to have an excellent chance
to retain the championship won last
year.
Wisconsin has been looked upon
with respect by all conference teams
since its 27 to 7 defeat of Northwest-
ern last week and has shown a rapid,
slashing attack which is almost irre-
sistible when in form. Ohio State
owns a victory over Purdue. Chicago
has defeated Purdue, while Iowa, aft-
er defeating Indiana, lost to Illinois.
Iowa, however, is not considered
weak and there appears little to
choose. All the other conference'
teams have off days.
FLAGS IN UNION BANQUET ROOM
LEFT HANGING FOR VISITORS
Emblems of Thirty Universities Sent
Here for Educational
Conference
In order that visitors in the city
for the Illinois game can view the
decorations placed in the banquet
room of the Union last week for the
educational conference banquet, the
flags and banners will be left hang-
ing another day.
Approximately 30 college and uni-
versity emblems, officially sent here
for the conference, together with the
national and state flags, the latter
bearing the seal of Michigan, consti-
tute the group.
Among the banners there are those
of the University of Minnesota and
Smith college, institutions of which
President Burton was formerly the
head.

was discovered that a fire, apparently
starting in a desk, had been burning
for some time at the end of the cor-
ridor in the fourth floor of University
hall. The third blaze was reported
at 4:20 o'clock yesterday afternoon.
This last fire also started in a desk
located in room 301 Mason hall, and
to all appearances had been burning
for about 15 minutes.
All three of the conflagrations
were extinguished with chemicals, the
fire department being notified only in
case of the last fire.
No explanation has been offered as
to the origin, but in order to guard
against any further outbreak, shoulhi
the fires have been set, the night
watch on the campus has been in-
creased.
That these fires were started by
matches in the drawers of the desks
seems unlikely, according to Mr. Fei-
ner, of the department of buildings
and grounds, for two reasons, first,
because it is in direct violation of a
University ruling to have sulphur
"strike" matches in any building on
the campus, and second, because in
the case of all the fires therehassbeen
no occasion for the use of matches
In the vicinity of their origin, smok-
ing being prohibited.

BOTH TEAMS LOOK
FOR HARD BATTLE
Dunn, Usher, Perrin and Nelson Will
Start in Backfield; Forward
Wall Strong
DETERMINATION GREATEST
ASSET OF YOST'S ELEVEN
(By Bob Angell)
Although Michigan and Illinois are
not ancient rivals, the struggle be-
tween the two football teams this
afternoon on Ferry field will be char-'
acterized by all the feeling which is
customarily attributed to long stand-
ing animosities.
The Illini have been victorious in
a majority of the athletic contests
with Michigan since the Wolverines
returned to the Conference. The
Maize and Blue warriors are deter-
mined to stem the tide this after-
noon and start it flowing in the othe,
direction. On the other hand, the In-
dians are out for another Big Ten
football title and are not likely to
look tolerantly upon any interfer-
ence with their plans.
Teams in Good Shape
The men of both teams are in good
shape with the single exception of
Steketee, who is still suffering from
the burst blood vessel received in the
M. A. C. game. The big fullback
will be the only Michigan regular out
of the line-up when the whistle blows
this afternoon. It is likely, however,
that Stek will get in before the con-
test is over.
According to the dope the Illini
will have the edge on the Wolverines.
They have six regulars of the 1919
championship eleven back, and as
many more substitutes from last
year. If Ralph Fletcher starts the
backfield will be exactly the same as
that which figured in the 29 to 7 de-
feat of Michigan at Urbana a year
ago. However, the Illini are not over-
confident, according to Coach Zupp-
ke, but realize that they will have'
their hands full to beat Michigan.
Wolverines Determined
The greatest single asset which the
Wolverines possess is their deter-
mination. They realize that theirs is
a fighting chance and they are going
to take advantage of it. The atti-
tude of the team is well expressed
by Coach Yost: "We have worked
hard for this game. We expect a
hard game, and we are going to make
Illinois know that they have been
through a hard game."
If both teams play as well defen-
sively as it is expected they will, the
game is likely to develop into one of
kicking and passing. Jack Dunn will
probably do the booting for the
Wolverines, and he can be relied on
to equal anything that the Indians
can show in this respect. As to

"Hurry Up" Yost Tells Five
Students That Illinois
Fine Team

Leads Wolverines

Two

SPIRIT INSTILLED
AT MAS ETN

Thousand
Has

Classes

CAPTAIN GOETZ
MICHIGAN GETS THIRD IN
FIRST DAY OF GOLF MEET
(Special to The Daily)
Chicago, Oct. 22. - Complete re-
turns from the first day of the Con-
ference golf tournament being held on
the Olympia Country club course at
Chicago show Michigan's representa-
tives, Ingham and Welch, to be in
third place among a field of seven
universities. The Wolverine golfers
are putting up a stellar game and
are close on the heels of the leaders,
Drake and Chicago.
Today's play will be decisive in the
first All-conference golf tournament,
and at present it appears that the
race for high honors lies between the
three leading teams. Standing at the
conclusion of yesterday's play was:
Drake, Chicago, Michigan, Wiscon-
sin, Ohio State, Illinois, Northwest-
ern. High scores are: Knepper, Chi-
cago, 75-78; McKee, Drake, 76-78;
Ingham, Michigan, 81-79; Welch,
Michigan, 86-84.
EXPECT 600 ILLINI
ROOTERS AT GAME
Six hundred students from the Uni-
versity of Illinois will arrive in Ann
Arbor this morning to witness the
game, according to K. L. Wilson, pub-
licity manager of the Athletic asso-
ciation at the University of Illinois.
This is the number that had signed
Friday to make the trip. The prob-
abilities are that more than this will
be on the train when it pulls in this
morning.
A- larger number than the local as-
sociation had anticipated is expected
and considerable concern is being
shown as to where the overflow will
be seated. It was first announced
that nearly 500 would make the trip

PROFESSOR BRUMM AND FRED
LAWTON GIVE SHORT TALKS
(By Joseph A. Bernstein)
If the Michigan football team this
afternoon will fight like Michigan
students, last night in Hill auditor-
ium, cheered, Illinois is beaten.
But mindful of the fact that victor-
ies aren't victories until the whistle
has blown and there is a difference in
the final score, the Wolverines are
not goingonthengridiron this after-
noon overconfident.
Coach Yost made this plain last
night at the pep meeting when he, aft-
er insistent demands from the galler-
ies, bluntly told the audience that
"there is no question about the fact
that Illinois has a fine team."
Five Thousand Present
There were 5,000 and more students
at the pep meeting last night. There
were Michigan men and women there;
and there were, on the quiet, a few
Illini in the audience, too.
Yet football games are not won by
yells or speeches, and the four men
who addressed the assemblage made
that clear. The Varsity football
team, representative of Michigan, oc-
cupying the first four rows in the
middle section, seemed to have under-
stood.
Coach Yost was unquestionably the
feature speaker of the evening. It was
his first appearance before a Michigan
student body in public, since the dis-
astrous season last year. Yost told
them just why the season was disas-
trous, how they could remedy the sit-
uation.

Nominate Officers
Yesterday's class nominees as re-
ported to the Student council for
freshmen laws are as follows: presi-
dent, Morris White and Francis
Chadwick; vice-president, George
Heidman and Thomas Dougherty;
secretary, Georges True and Elmer
Stephenson; treasurer, Jerold O'Brien
and Harold Jones.
The freshmen engineers' meeting
which was to be held yesterday aft.
ernoon for nominations of secretary
and treasurer was postponed on ac-
count of the small attendance until
further notice.
Freshman homeops nominated the
following men at a meeting held Fri-
day afternoon: president, H. J. Bris-
bois and C. P. Schneider; vice-pres-
ident, L. J. Danielewski and G. J.
Williams secretary, J. Hookey and
J. Henkel; treasurer, D. Lonie and
A. J. Brickbauer.
DAILY TO PUBLISH
FOOTBALL EXTRA
With the determination to
break all records for the print-
ing of an extra, a special Daily
staff will issue the Illinois foot-
ball extra, which will be on sale
at the close of the game Satur-
day afternoon.
The extra will contain a run-
ning story of the game, a review
of the situation in the Confer-
ence, photographs of the Illin-
ois captain, Depler, Steketee,
Coach Pratt, and a group pic-
ture, the first to be released, of
the Michigan eleven.
In addition to these features
there will also be stories on
basketball, and a digest of the
football situation between Mich-
igan and Illinois since their first
game in 1898.

Up to Student
"There isn't a man in this auditor-
ium," Coach Yost declared, "but who
could add something to Michigan's
athletic prestige. It's up to you to do
it. I'd like to ask each man here what
he is doing for Michigan. You must
all get the idea of service. I'd like
to see the enthusiasm that you are
displaying here tonight, become real
action, real service to your Univer-
sity."
Yost was the last man in the pro-
gram to speak. Insistent demands
for Captain Goetz were quieted when
it was explained to the audience that
his energy was needed in the game
this afternoon.
Prof. Brumm Speaks
Prof. John R. Brumm, for the facul-
ty, spoke first. Short, snappy, and full
of pep, he, in terms that could not be
-misunderstood, told the Michigan stu-
dent body just why mass meetings
were. J. Fred Lawton, author of Var-
sity, was the speaker for alumni. In
characteristic manner, he appealed to
spirited Michigan, and won his audi-
ence to his cause in the few minutes
that he consumed.
Al Cutherbert, '21E, newly ap-
pointed cheer leader, handled the
cheering. The Varsity band in full
force was there to add its important

passing, the Illinois team is known to and accordingly that number of seats
be especially strong in this depart- were reserved.
ment, whereas the Yostmen have had' Contrary to previous reports, Mr.'
little occasion to use the aerial at- Wilson states that at Urbana consid-
tack so far this season. erable interest is being directed to-
(Contiued on page Three) ward the game.

president

of the '23 Dental class.
R. B. COLLINS.

MICHIGAMUA ALUMNI
INVITED TO DINNER
All alumni members of Mich-
igamua, who are in the city for
the Illinois game, are invited to
the dinner to be held at 6:30
o'clock tonight in the Michigan
Union. Reservations can be
made by calling Robert Cook at
I31.

CUSTOMS VARY
Customs varying in different schools sometimes lead to misunder-
standings when representatives of one school visit another. Such was
the case last night at Hill auditorium, a few minutes before the pep
meeting was called to order.
There was no one on the platform to handle the large number of
students who had gathered there early. An Illinois man, wearing an
"I" sweater, entered. The cry of "coats" went up.
The Illinois man, not well enough acquainted with Michigan cus-
toms did not seem to understand that at a Michigan pep meeting, the
proper thing for an individual in the audience to do was to "display
his shirt sleeves" so to speak.
The misunderstanding followed. The Illinois man, feeling that the
treatment was not courteous, left the auditorium before the meeting
was called to order.
The incident is unquestionably one to be regretted. Some few
Michigan students may have acted hastily when it might have been well
to have given the wearer of the "I" a little extra consideration in
view of the fact that he was a visitor.

bit to the program of the evening.
The meeting was declared one of
the most successful mass meetings
ever held at the University. Spirit was
at its height. Screen projections of
individual pictures of the Varsity
football men were greeted with
thunderous cheers and applause.
Knight Mirrielees, '20E, presided
over the meeting.
If Michigan's football team this aft-
ernoon will fight like Michigan stu-
dents, last night in Hill auditorium,
cheered, Illinois is beaten.
DAILY TO GIVE OUT
FOOTBALL RESULTS I
Information regarding scores
of football games will be given
out from The Daily, phone 960,
6:30 until 11 o'clock Saturday
evein

i

Vv ua1.

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