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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 24, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE ]

DAILY

THE DAILY

141

ublisked every morning except Monday during the Univer.
ear by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
hie Asoited Press s ,xclsiely entitled to the use for
licaton of all news dispatches credited to it or not oherwise
ed in this paper and the local news published therein.
.ntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, is second
mattr.
ubscription by carrier er mail, $3.50.
1ffces: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
hones: Business, 960; Editckial, 2414.
'ommnctins nsot to exced-.300 words, if signed, the Sig.
ot nec sarily' toappear in ]hint, but as an evidenceiof
and otices.of events will be published in "Th Daily at the
Blon of th Eito,f left at or mailed to The Daily office.
ned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
t will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
he 'Daily does not necessarily endorse tthe sentiments e
4 in the cm iations.
What'. Goig O," notices wil, not be receved after a o'clock
s evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF'
Telephone 2414
AGING EDITOR ........GEORGE 0. BROPHY J.
E dir............... .........Chesser M. Campbell
aan Editorial Board.........l............Lee Woodruff
Editors-.W.thoc
*x HEAdans H. W. Rtchcock
-enand Serwood IX WSarent, .,
reditor..................J A. Bernstein
,ditor ........... -. -----.. --.... "'B. P. Cam pbell
als...'.... T. . .whineryLA.ern, S. 'T. Beach
......................Robert Angell
ns Editor....Mary D. Lane
P................Thomas Dewey
S............. ......E. R. Meiss
Assistants
Ine wai. Frank H. McPike Sidney B. Coates
ยข, weber' J))A. Bacon C. T Pennoyer
th Vicer W. W. Ottaway Marion B.Stahl
t einidel Paul Watel. Lowell S. Kerr
. ndy Byron Darnto- Marion Koch
EifOerhgolter M.rA. Kave Dorothy Whipple
Z. Adams Walter Donnelly .Gerald P. Over t
I, Adam Elliott uBeata Haley ]y Edward Jmbrecht
o Mclaiu Kathrine Montgomery Sara Wailer
stoR ali .H. E. owett
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone NO0
LIESS MANAGER..........LEGRAND A. GAIPES, JR.
sing...................D P. Toyce
.............. .....---S. Kunstadter
atin .......................-- .. -F M r Heath
nt.................... .~Prieh
- -on --- . .-... . F. Hillery
Assistants
. Lambrht M M MNule H. C. unt
Hamel, Jr. N. W.-Rob'eton M S. Goldrig
R HLutchinO1o Thos..L. Rice . H. W.idbreder
. t~rdss R. G. Burchll W. Cooley
t.:E.J avs Ae. J.Parker
ersons wishig to secure Information conceuning news for any
f TheDaiy sould e the night editor, who has full charge
gews, to e printed that night. _____________
TUESDAY, MAY 24, 1921.
Night Editor-W. W. OTTAWAY.
e editorial staf and tryouts 'ixnl meet at 5
.k today. __
[INDSIGH'T ON THE CONVENTION
ght of the ten Middle-West universities which
u.tp the Western Conference sent elegates
e convention of editors whiche set in the Union
the last week-end, founded the Wetern Con-
ce Editorial association as a permanent union
I the student publications in the Big Ten,
:ed a resolution against the present eligibility.
on summer professional ball playing, set go-
.n organization for intercollegiate radio serv-
rovided for an advance photograph and news
inge between the ten schools included in the
nation, and discussed all sorts of student gov-
eint and journalistic problems in a thorough
which should bring practical benefits to every
rsity represented.'.
r a first convention, the turnout was remark
But as a permanent organization, the new
iation will need first of all a much increased
lance, with every university and every possi-
publication represented. There should be
;h delegates from each kind of student publi-
is - news, technical, humorous, opinion, an-
- to make, it profitable for the conventions
ide into sections devoting part of the time of
Heetings to specialized problems.
perience at the first convention will also doubt-
each a more businesslike precedure, a less not-
:endency to carry on minor points, a disposition
t the big things done right in the short time
ed. ' The tentative nature of this year's
er" convention made a certain amount of
ing time unavoidable.
inting out, then, the above two directions of
>vement, it should not be passed over that a

r noteworthy advance in intra-Conference
nt relations has been effected. For the first
campus leaders of the Big Ten have met, not
mpetition, but in a common move for mutual
ssion and mutual action. As one, the dele-
have voted a recommendation to the athletic
ils of the Conference to alter one of the most
rtant and most-discussed rules of the Big Ten.
may be expected to put all the power of pub-
at their command behind the move they have-
supported. The intercollegiate board of offi-
and the impartially selected committees will,
ne geoes on, serve as an increasing guarantee
iendship and understanding. Best of all, the
al conventions will come each spring to clear
ir of mistakes and factions and prejudices, set
nachinery of unity going again, and serve to
fy the interests and increase the amity of these
ster institutions.
"ADS"
ien modern advertising was in its infancy it
ooked upon by the public as the, necessary
hat accompanied most periodicals and publi.
ts. Practically no effort was spent to make
tisements attractive or even interesting, and
ght have been expected the results that the
tinr received were ;:n I;rrfn rni.A-it t

slipshod policy. Advertisers consistently exagger-
ated the facts in the description of goods and every
advantage was taken to puff the copy with un-
trutlas and misrepresentations. But the public
caught on.
Fortunately for the future of advertising the
business men were quick to realize the futility of
pursuing such tactics and in time the old unattrac-
tive advertisements were replaced by copy that
really carried a message to the reader. The state-
ments of gross exaggeration were replaced by con-
servative and accurate descriptions. The whole
standard was raised.
As advertising came to play a more and more
important part in the success of every business, it
was natural that the best talent obtainable should
be attracted to this field. Many fortunes were
built up solely by the power of advertising, and
thousands upon thousands of dollars were spent
each year in establishment of a business name or
in demand creation for a single product. The great
stress laid on this field caused advertisements
steadily to improve until they reached the class of
art. Undoubtedly more Americans are familiar
with the famous drawings for the Cream of Wheat
company, and with Coles Phillips' girls, than with
Mona Lisa.
Since advertising has reached its present status,
it has been looked upon more and more as an at-
tractive field for college men, and each year has
witnessed many graduates taking up the work.
Men with a college education are particularly fitted
for it, as the successful advertising man nieeds broad
information and the ability to think and express
himself in a clear and concise manner. While great
strides have been made in the development of clean.
and appealing advertising, it is still rightly felt that
the final goal has not been attained and the world
will undoubtedly see a further developinet with the
influx of collegians. When we consider that two-
thirds of our average popular maigazine consists of
"ads", we cannot but be compelled to think that'
the change is worth-while, even viewed in the light
of a public influence.
GET OUT THAT UNIFORM
Last year, as a part, of the Memorial day exer-
cises, a new custom was inaugurated at the .ni-
versity, that of having all ex-service men turn out
in uniform for a parade with exercises, anda re-
view at Ferry field. Next Monday the occasion
for honoring soldier dead comes around again, and
an effort is being'made to have a turn-out of simi-
lar proportions to that one a year ago.
Those of us wyho, in O. D. khaki, or navy blue
during the war, were fortunate enough to pull
through safely, owe a duty to those of our own
comrades who gave their lives to the boys of '6
to '64 to whom the day was dedicated. It is not
exactly a matter in which we should consult our
own desires entirely. We have a duty, a duty of
sympathy, gratitudetandthonor to perform, and it
is up-.to usto see that the custom begun in I920
be upheld and carried along through succeeding
years.
Every man - gob, dughboy, leatherneck, shave-
tail, or colonel - out in uniform next Monday!
T.he aTelescope
Eternally Doomed
When freshmen throw away their pot
Their freshman year is o'er,-
But some are freshmen still, and will
Be freshmen evermore.
Some people are so "dunb" they think baseball
is something wicked.
Qouth Eppie Taf:
Beneath these stones, repose the bones
Of poor old Oswald Grimm,
For years each day he took his beer
And then the bier took him.

Our Latest Song Entitled:
"Where There's a Will There's Relatives."
He Was Took With Her
He liked her very much,
In fact he loved her, and wished her
To be his wife. So he visited her,
And proposed at once, but she
Did not answer. Undaunted, he proposed
Again, and still she made no reply.
Then finally, in the midst of a passionate
Avowal of love, she interrutped,
And asked whose car he had been driving
The day before. And when he answered
That it was his very own, "Take me, she said,
Holding back no longer, "If you love me, take me-
For a ride".
Stolen Thunder
Said a bald-headed man to a waitress bold
"See, here, young woman,, my cocoa's cold-!"
She scornfully answered: I can't help that;
If the blame thing's [chilly, put on your hat."
-New YorkStar.

GOLF

SUPPLIES

I

-AT-"

S R BOTH ENDS

OF AM'S
OTHE" DIAGONAL WALK

DETROIT UNITED I LNE
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann .Arbor and Jackson
De(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. in., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Linuited to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. 'Ex-
presses at 9:48 a-. n. and eery two
hours. to 9:48 p. m.:
Locals to Detroit-5 : 55a.m.. 7:00 a.m
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only;
11:40 p.m.. 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson--7 : d. nm., and
12:10 p.m.
1921 MAY 1921
S 1~i T -IV T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 14 17 1S 19 20 21
22 24 24 25 26. 27 28
29. 30 31i
PANAMAS
We Clean, Bleach and Block
Panaimas., etc., into the Late
Shapes, with all new trimmings
to look just' like new. We don't
use any acids and do only High
Class Work. Factory Hat Store,
617 Packard St. Phone 1792.

Try Daily advertising and wateb Daily advertising will spell prosper-
your business grow.-Adv. ity for you.-Adv.
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- -
Ask YOUrGrocer
. . . For . ..
KLICO BEVER AGES
Coca Cola in Bottles
Anheuser Busch, Budweiser
Kleis Beverage. Co. -
Phone 1948
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PRO RAMS and, INVITATIONS

I

t'
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AUTOMOBILES FOR HIRE
By Trip or Hour
Phone
391i or R03M
Party rides a specialty

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Our SPECIALTY

"Everything in Printing"

MAYER-SCHAIRER CO.
112 S. MAIN STREET PHONE 1404

DON'T MISS THIS BIG NIGHT

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The

Musical

Clubs

Of the Michigan Union

OF

In a

Variety
Thursday,

Program

May

26

Hill

Auditori urn

11

Music, Novelty Acts, Comedy Skits

Something Altogethe

Different

Mo onshine" and "The Big Four"

Will Be Sure Leaders

Know Your University
For the benefit of those who wish to: day
and float up in the clouds during recitation,
207 U-hall has been equipped with an exit
northwest corner of the. ceiling.

dream
Room
in the

I1111111111I11 llllllllllllllllll11111111111111[1111111111l1111I11111t11111111111111111ilNllllllllll(1llliliillillllilllllllllllllllllilllfllll

Famous Closing Lines
"A fitting remark," thought the customer as the
tailor asked for his wait mFac 1rPJrT

8 P.M.

Tickets 50c

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