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May 22, 1921 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"' ' !

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Y FEATURE SECTION
every Sunday as a supplement to
news section of The Michigan
us must be in the hands of the]
ednesday previous to the date of
.ation.
unications or contributions must
an indication of good faith.
litor.... Joseph A. Bernstein
Assistants
Dakin thomas H. Adams
Ottaway Byron Darnton
itor............ Stewart T. Beack
. Edwin R. Miess
L DIGEST
- (By E. R. I.)

So they walked into the building
By the side way off the street;
And they searched the little dining-
room,
But couldn't find a seat.
.Then the manager advised them,,
"Seek the larger dining-room,"
But the student waxed indignant,
And began to rage and fume.
"I'm a big man on this campus,
I have done things for the school;
And as yet I've not been taken
For a co-ed fussin' fool. .
"I admit I like this girl, but
She will put me in disgrace;
So if you can't spare a ,table,
Then we'll go some other place."
Oh, what cruel, piercing jabber
Comes from his conceited dough-
head,,
Who insults his charming partner
Just because she is a co-ed.
But the girl, she's not offended,
She is turned with flattery;
Just to think that she is out with
Such a "marv" B. M. O. C.
I'Envoil
In this land of idol worship, .
It's the men who have achieved,
Who can get away with murder.,
Yetbe trusted and believed.
FRANCE TO AMUSE SYRIANS
WITII PROPAGANDA PLAYS
Paris.-Plays are to be presented in
that part of Syria over which France
was given a mandate by the League
of Nations, as a part of the French
propaganda there.

Roman ticists
HAVE NOT BEEN DISCOUR-
AGED BY THE VOGUE OF '
REALISM
(By II. D. S.)
Reviews of modern realistic novels
have filled these columns rather con-
sistently for the past few weeks. But,
despite the increasing popularity of
this sort of fiction, there are still
many readers whose pleasure in a
book depends solely upon its ability
to entertain them. For this reason I
shall speak briefly this week of a trio
of first-rate romanticists.
"They Went" (Dodd-Mead), by Nor-
man Douglas, provides an entertaining
two hours of pure romanticism. It is
one of those once-upon-a-time novels
with kings, princesses, dwarfs, sorcer-
esses, and all the rest of the imagina-
tive paraphernalia. After one has fin-
ished reading "They Went" one may
still be rather hazy as to just what]
the book is all about. The chief merit
lies, however, 'not in the work as a
whole, buit in the various incidents,
in the smooth-even at times almost
beautiful-prose, and in the occasional
bits of satire and bursts of unexpected
wit. The book is well done for this
sort of a thing, but one feels that
James Branch Cabell could have han-
dled the material in a much more ca-
pable manner.

Speaking of Cabell, I should like to
recommend his "Taboo" (McBride), a
slender little volume of but 40 pages,
rewritten from an article which' orig-
inally appeared in The Weekly Re-
view, and issued in a limited edition
of 920 copies. Mr. Cabell dedicates his
book in words steaming with acid po-
liteness to John S. Sumner, the emi-
nent hangman of "Jurgen." In "Ta-
boo," the "Memoir gf Saevius Nicanor"
and the "Legend" consist of a most
gentlemanly thumbing of the nose and
as clever a piece of satire as this re-
viewer has read. Incidentally, the au-
thor settles his score not only with Mr.
Sumner but with Philistines in general
and several reviewers in particular.
Cabell at His Best
These 40 pages show Cabell at his
best. His perfect diction, his suave
reserve, his subtle sarcasm, his mock-
ing cynicism, and his ability to write
beautiful and musical prose .are all ad-
mirably illustrated. The book is thor-
oughly Cabellesque in its affected
Mediaevalism and its mock-serious
reference to forbidding volumes of

mythology for his texts, for there is
scarcely one of his tales which does
not develop a Freudian complex or
shoot off on some queer bias.
"Limbo" Worth Reading
Every one of the stories in "Limbo"
is well worth reading. The first two
are, perhaps, the best. "The Farcical
History of Richard Greenow" is a pe-
culiar account of abnormality, a tale
of a spiritual Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.
"Happily Ever After- is even better.
It is not only an interesting character
study but a most entertaining story
as well. The sketch, "Happy Fami-
lies," is a weird exposition of sup-
pressed desires. Altogether, "Limbo"
is an excellent collection of stories-
the kind you read twice.
INITIAL FESTIVAL PLAYED
TO HOUSE, OF ONE HUNDRED
-
(Continued from Page One)
students. From 1888 to 1894 the cho-
rus put on several of the larger choral
works with a great measure of suc-
cess.
Started In '94
It was in 1894 that the first May,
Festival was given. It is said that
this was not a phenomenal success,
for only 58 singers appeared on the
stage, while the audience contained
about twice that number. But the so-
'ciety, working under the slogan of its
director to "do more than before," at
the second festival achieved a suc-
cess that was nearly disastrous in its
results. Old University hall was filled

to t.. a audience
flowra o ,t moAi=. ;. :own the
stairs and e -t : age. To
mak. m r cloud-
burst greeted t. a as it left
this concert. T -irval was
one of four con, ri .ig choral
number of whic 's "Dam-
nation of Faust."
During the 33 t . Stanley
has been in char>- hzoral Union
practically all li'a'l choral
works of note h' " _ en. These
include Verdi's ' per's "Fly-
ing Dutchman," ' * ," Act 1,
"Meistersinger," n, 'r "Tannhau-
ser," Paris versi EV!. 'I'-Carmen,"
Mendelssohn's '_i'., Rossini's
"Stabtt Mater." 'xrie-Taylor's
"Hiawatha's WedC . 1r st," and
many others. 'I h conearts have
made it possible to iV_ u >le the best
(talent that the ?nu, -1 world has to
offer for the soL.
Some " °r4ot, ari;gs"
Last night's cncer- was number
363 in the May West> eries, but the
complete n.umbi - < oacrts directed
by the University Maica' society in
addition to the -a Uu n concerts
is 1,225. These may be si«;d to cover
the entire field of ensEmable and solo
music. Many of the uiportant ensem-
ble works were given their first hear-
ing in Ann Arbor.
Dating from 191r. tuc ay F.estivals
have been give in 2il aditoium, the
large seating capacity of whi h makes
it possible for them th > iief on a
much larger scale.

VE ACHIEVED

>f idol worship,
n who have achieved,
away with murder,
ed and believed.

weighty
From

erudition.1
Douglas to Cabell is not a

k that I'm a liar,
r in the 'oean;
you with -a story
what I mean.

great step, but from Cabell to Aldous
Huxley is a long leap, for Huxley
stands at the opposite pole of roman-
ticism, with his feet, as it were, on
the earth and his head among the
clouds. His "Limbo" is a collection'
of six ' short stories and one sketch,
all unusually clever and well written.
From these stories it would seem that
Huxley uses Freud and some perverse

ere was, a student,
>wn Ann Arbor college,
>ne things on the- campus,
he hadn't gained much
wledge.
ad a girl at school,
>rove his love was real,
led her to the' Union
treat her to a meal.'

OVERTURE-SUPPE
Morning, Noon and Evening
in Vienna

setectioli-Boito's Opera'
Mefletofele

EssenCe of Goodness

"'' .'"'
; ' ,.
'

"They took their pleasure.
I am collecting in pain"

In Ice Cream Lies In

Now

Playing

17'r 4UU

The 'labor

The Sensation
of Sensations

'I1

5

rt
;I

iCE CREAM
Certainly has got the flabor

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SUNDAY
MONDAY

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MTGEORGE ALSS

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rom His Famous Stage SuecO8&

77'
" ci

Y OU"LL follow the
less king of San
with breathless interest.
hated humanity with the
brain.

career of Blizzard, leg-
Francisco's underworld,
A satanic cripple-he
e frenzy of a disordered

Paris, the city of love and laughter, of sin and sorrow,
is the locale of "The Devil," a story of the French aristocracy,
of artists and pretty models.
It takes one inside the beautiful Champs Elysees Galleries,
and the magnificent home of Dr. Muller-the Devil-who,
loved to break his human toys at his urfique and sumptuous
social functions.
A Supreme Photoplay Triumph

/

t N

ON

C.HANEY

t .1

CLAIRE ADAMS, KENNETH HARLAN

IN THE FAJIOUS STORY
HE PENALTY

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