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October 22, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

xan Datill

'1

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning exept Monday during the Univer-
year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
iblication of all news dispatches credited to it or ffot otherwise
Bled in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
smatter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Edito-ial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
ire no""necessalyto appear in print, but as an evidene of
, and- notices of events will b<; published in The Daily at the
retion of the Editor, if left; at or mailed o The Dail' office*
igned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
ipt will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
:sed in the communications.
"What's Going Oan" noticcs will not be received after 8 o'clock
:he evoning preceding insertion.
EDITOBIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414 ,
NAGING EDITOR...........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
,s Editor..........................Chesser X. Campbell
ht Editors- - . w. H
T. IH.,AdamsH.WHicok
B. P. ambel3. E. M Manla
Cakelil T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud SherwoodJ.s
lay Editor.............." ".+....5A enti
orials............Lee Woodruf, Robert Sage, T .Liner
its, .....................................Robert Angell
nen's Editor...................... -..Mary D. Lane
graph .......................*..... ......West Gallogly
scope .............. ..................Jack W. Ke
Assistants
phine Waldo Frances Oberholtzer L. Armstrong Kern
1 G. Weber Robert E. Adams Hughston McBain
ena Barlow Norman C. Damon. Frank H. McPike
abeth Vickery* Byron Darnton Gerald P. Overton
F. Clark Thomas F. Dewey Edward Lambrocht
>ge Reindel Wallace F. Elliott William H. Riley Jr.
othy Monfort 'Leo J. Hershdorfer Sara Waller

ry B. Grundy

eT,

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 980
INESS MANAGER .... .. .. LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
rtising .................................D. P. Joyce
fieds.... ............. .... .Robt. 0. Kerr
.cation........................FV. M. Heath
runts.......................................... E. R. Priehs
lation ..................................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
V, Lambrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
:.,Gower F. A. Cross R, C. Stearnes
und Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
r W. Millard M. M. Moule D.. G. Saws
Ha~mel Jr. D. S. Watterworth

'Gn
Ste
F.

aiaaww , ..

The night editors for the week will be as fol-
oWS: . Mori ay night, Jack Dakin; Tuesday night,
hornton Sargent; Wednesday night, Brewster
ampbell; Thursday night, Hugh Hitchcock; Fri-
lay night, Thomas Adams; Saturday night, John
dcManis.
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
sue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
f all news to be printed that night.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1920.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
Engineering was taught in the College 'of Liter-
ture, Science and the Arts until 1995. It was
hen trade a separate department with Prof.
'harles E. Greene as dean. The present drn,
~'ortimer E. Cooley, was appointed in i9o4. The
ollowing year the department of Architecture was
e-established as a part of the Department of En-
ineering. In January, 1915, the title of the de-
artments was changed to the present name, the
olleges of Engineering and Architecture.
THE SIGN ON THE SIDEWALK
"Beat Illinois," painted in great maize and blue
tters on the sidewalk struck tha eye of thousands
f student and faculty crossers of the diagonal
'hursday. If the idea sticks, it will be worth
iuch more than the paint to. put it on, and the
i-yi work to take it off again.
But "Beat Illinoisi," to be a factor in the win-
ing of a real football game against an admittedly
trong riva on Ferry field, has got to be much
iore than a sign on the sidewalk. It must-
ithout any desire to be sentimental-be lettered
eep into the heart of every Michigan student; in
must-be gathered all the loyalty which he has
ored up for use on the day when he, personally,
6uld take an active part in bringing to Michigan
victory. That day is Saturday, Oct. 23. The
:am is ready, to the last man; but for the trial to-
Lorrow something more than the fighting creed of
even men may be required.
Everyone who has seen a great game where the
ales hang in the balance from quarter to quarter,
here every inch of advance is fought for with
rery ounce of each team's brawn and nerve,
a ws that there is a power in such a battle which
lies like a draught of life, a renewal of strength,
om the thousands of souls behind the sidelines.
'e comeback is a product of this force, plus -the
dividual super-efforts of th* players. When Michi-
n fights as it has in the past, when it comes from
hind to conquer in the last few minutes, as
ainst Northwestern last fall and against Syra-
se in 1916, it is because the team feels in a tre-
endous degree that it stands for Michigan, that
e athletic reputation 9f a great University is be-
rd its efforts.
Tat isr the feeling we can give the team tqmor-
w, and our weapon is the yell. Tonight, at the
p meeting, we are going to learn how to use that
apon as never before. Tomorrow, fortified as
will be by the throats of many thousand aluni
d supporters of Michigan, we are going to make
c Power of Loyalty stalk like a twelfth man into
My play.
'Beat Illinois !"-our task is to make it more than
ign on the sidewalk.

PREPAREDNESS
During a recent week three world titles were
lost and won. The victors in each case have be-
come famous, but that is the thing of least impor-
tance. The fact that the best prepared team, man,
and horse won the title in his respective competi-
tion is what should be emphasized. It is not al-
ways the biggst or most capable competitor that
wins ; the man who ,puts the most forethought in
his fight or race, the'fellow who tales the best pre-
caution, has a -very good chance.
The Cleveland American League club, which won
the world's title in 1920 baseball, did not necessar-
ily have the best array of crack ball players, but it
did take the most minute pains to play and use its
men at the right time and where they could do the
most good. "Man of War," the American horse
which won the horse racing honors - when he
defeated "Sir Barton," was put through the most
careful training possible; his diet, baths, and gen-
eral care were carried out almost like a science.
Carpentier, the new light heavyweight champion,
if at all confident before his victory, kept quiet
about it and stuck to rigid trainig and .cautious
preparation.
Preparation is too big a thing to be ignored ; the
David with a carefully prepared sling can slay the
most ferocious Goliath.
MICHIGAN'S ALUMNI
The spirit which holds Michigan alumni and
students together as one great body instead of two
separate forces has shown conclusively that Mich-
igan means much more than a place in which to
spend four years.
Last year our alumni worked hard for the Uni-
versity. - The hospitality and entertainment which
the Glee club met everywhere on its Pacific coast
trip tnade the members feel that this spirit extended
to every state and every city of the land. The
many splendid gifts to the campus and, above all,
the unselfish vigor with which our alumni have
gone to work when Michigan has needed good men
fV service on the campus, are worthy of the high-
est commendation.
To these alumni, as much perhaps as to any
other single force, Michigan owes its present high
standing. They have co-operated with every con-
structive measure and have made the University a
better place for us today. e, who are enjoying the
benefits of their untiring effort, should not fail to
appreciate their loyalty and to accord them our
deepest respect. Their return for the big, games
will afford us an opportunity to repay something of
what they have done for Michigan.
W ILCOME BACK END MAN
Promising plans have already begun to mate-
rialize oxt of the recent entrance of the Glee and
Mandolin club into tle Union organization.
Prompted by the valuable support and facilities ten-
-dered it by its new foster-parent, the musical club
is seriously considering suggestions as to how it
can best make use of its opportunities, and t he
Union has asked permission for the club to stage
an old time minstrel show as the first progressive
step.
Reminiscent of "the good old ays,' 'the minstrel
show, with its faultlessly dressed patronizing in-
terlocutor, its carefree, droll, and boisterous black-
fac endmen, and its spontaneous merrirent, of-
fers big possibilities to the musical club, built on
such a framework, a program certainly will never
be deadened by restraint or formality, and may con-
tain as many songs and mandolin pieces as may be
desired.
The chances for variety in mandolin and glee
club work are almost infinite in minstrelsy. Inter-
est on the part of the audience can be constantly
stimulated by the spontaneous changes in enter-
tainers and mode of entertainment, as the prnci-
pals may be different for each song or piece, and
jokes and dancing may bridge gaps between num-
bers. There can be little doubt that the Glee and
Mandolin club could score real- triumph in black-

face.
The Telescope

ii=

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect June 15, 1920
Betweon
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
{Ha.#tern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:10 a. i. and hourly -to
9:10 p. M.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two 'hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e. ary two
hours to 9:48 p. mn.
Locals to Detroit : 55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m. and 1:10 a.m.
Locais to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

TtK S M4NK EC:US PAT. OM7

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Featuring Brogue Oxfords

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10 11 13 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
So
len: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
leek just like new, wear just as
long amd saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Faetorf Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
CORRECTION
Due to incorrect information receiv-
ed by The Daily, the name of one of
the nominees for sophonore engineer
football manager was rn as Joseph
Bleck, This should lhave been Joeepk
Vlack.
Dance Friday and Saturday-Pack-
ard. -Adv.

_
---_ ,

alk-OvertCo
Price 14, 15, 16 Doll
Cordovan or Rssal n

GRAA

(Two Stores)

Both

NOTE THE PRICE AGAIN

Ends of the Diagonal Walk

mrse
ars
Calf
Sop

C HAM

Walk-Over Boot

a!

115

South Main Street

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RTW

8TyLE HEADQUARTEaR.S

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Ayle thateeticksn out
Q)uality that is builtin
The label is not the only place that you can see the trade.
mark of good fabrics and good tailoring.
You can see it in the style of the clothes.
Spciety Brand Clothes are cleverly designed and their
style "sticik" out, but that is only because the quality is
built-inr.- through fine tailoring of all-wool fabrics.
The men who buy Society Brand Clothes are the real
clothes critics, They are the kind of men. you would
Ork out of any_ crowd on any fashionable street in
America a men of good taste.
They br- Society Brand Clothes simply because they
get what they want in these clothes -style, smart line;,
hand-tailoring, satisfying service.

I,,

Mary had a swarm of bees,
And they, to save their lives,
Must go wherever Mary went,
'Cause Mary had the hives.
S.E.P.

No, Clarice, you can't judge a thing by its name.
We once knew a fellow who thought a grass widow
was so designated because she was green.
Today's nominee for the Royal Order of Oil
Cans is last year's freshman who at the football
game sings "da, da, da-daa-" when the band,
plays the Yellow and Blue.
Dear Noah: -
What is the youngest age at which an, infant has
ever been known-to utter speech? A. B.
Why, the Good -Book tells us that "Job cursed
the day he was born."
Famous Closing Lines
"Ha, a running mate," he murmured as he saw
the angry wife pursuing her husband.
NOAH COUNT.

Better see at once our
clothsN.

ranb (Jflothwz
Fall showing of these unequalled
'uertk
WJUERTH THEATRE

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