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October 22, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR; SOMEWHAT
COOLER TODAY

Ap

wattx

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRI
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 16.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1920.

PRICE FIVE

T

PROFITEERING 19 I S
-CHARGD0AGINST
ARMIOURHAND Col
FEDERAL COURT INDICTS AS RE-
SULT OF SECRET INVEST-
IGATION
OFFICERS OF COMPANY
ACCUSED INDIVIDUALLY
Packers Deny That They Have Over-
charged Public for Meat Sold
This Year
New York, Oct. 21. - The federal
grand jury today, as a result of a sec-
ret investigation conducted by the at-
torney general's office, returned an in-
dictment against Armour & company,
Chicago packers, and against the of-
ficers of the company individually,
charging them with profiteering in
violation of the Lever act.
The indictment contains 137 counts,
each of which contains a sale of lamb
at an alleged unlawful and unreason-
ably rate. During April, May Sind
June, the meat. it is charged, cost
Armour & company $18.46 per 100
pounds; that the lwest it was sold
for was $23, and the highest $35, all
the sales being made to customers in
New York.
The average net profit to the com-
pany was placed at $6.61 per 100
pounds.
The indictment was reported to Fed-
eral, Judge Hand.
OFFICIALS DENY REPORT
Chicago, Oct. 21.-Declaring that,
"with our lamb business as a whole
shoving a loss it seems a rather bit-
ter joke to indict us for making too
much money," officials of Armour &
company said in a statement, com-
menting on the federal indictments
returned in New York.
"We are at a loss," the statement
said, "to understand these indict-
ments. The reasonableness of profits
cannot be judged by a consideration
of a few transactions. We have made
money through the sale of New Zea-
land lambs, but we did not make
enough on them to offset the losses
we sustained in the sale of domestic
lambs, and with our lamb business as
a whole showing a loss, it seems rath-
er a bitter joke to indict us for mak-
ing too much money."
SPECIAL RITE TO OHIO
GAME NOT YET SECURED

SCHOOL OF MUSIC COMPLIMENTARY
RECITALS TO BEGIN NEXT SUNDAY

POLITICAL VIEWS
TO BE PUBLISHED
Here's an opportunity for you
to air your political opinions.
Are yu Republican or Demo-
crat and if so, why?
Do you think Harding or Cox
will be elected? What makes
you think so?
The Michigan Daily is plan-
ning on giving you a chance to
say just these things in the Sun-
day Supplement, next week.
Write your opinions and mail
them to the Sunday Editor,
Michigan Daily, Press building.
They must be in the hands of
the editor before Oct. 27, and
should be typewritten, double
spaced, and signed.
What have you to say?
'UNION SEHRCS'
Cohn, Gaines, Porter, Eaton, Brophy,
Yerkes, Beckwith Added to
Committee
LEADING ADDRESS THAT OF
PRESIDENT MARION L. BURTON
Completion of the prog anm for the
University services next Sunday
night was effected and new members
of the student committee on Univer-
sity services were elected at its
meeting yesterday afternoon. Plans
for further services were also con-
sidered.
Seven New Members Elected
The new members of the committee
were elected to fill the places of those
of last year who graduated or re-
signed. The seven new members are
as follows: Abe J. Cohn, '21L, Le-
Grand A. Gaines, Jr., '21E, Donald J.
Porter, '21, Paul W. Eaton, '21,
George O. Brophy, Jr., '22L, Aletha
Yerkes, '21, and Beatrice N. Beck-
with, '21.
Heading the program for the serv-
ices Sunday night is the address by
President Marion L. Burton. Music,
a short talk by C. Stewart Baxter,
'21, and religious exercises complete
the program. It is as follows:
Organ prelude, Adagio......Guilmant
Hymn, Creation
Prayer
Anthem, "Build Thee More Stately
Mansions" ............Andrews
Scripture lesson
Soprano solo with violin obligato,
Ave Maria .........Bach-Gounod
Address, "The Function of Relig-
ion in College Life"
Hymn, Eventide
Benediction
Organ postlude, Breton rhapso-
dies ... ..............Saint-Saens
The organ postlude will begin at
6:46 and the services proper promptly
at 7 o'clock.
Quartet Will Slag
William Wheeler, head of the voice
department of the University School
of Music, has charge of all the mu-
sic. Earl V. Moore of the School of
Music will be at the organ and Mrs.
William Wheeler will render the so-
prano solo. Marian Struble is to be
the violinist and the anthem will be
rendered by a picked quartet of mixed
voices.
LATE WIRE BRIEFS

London, Oct. 21. - Prison officials
continue to force nourishment on
Lord Mayor MacSwiney, who was
still delirious tonight, according , to
the late bulletin issued by The Irish
Self Determination league. The may-
or is unable to recognize friends, but
the delirium is of a quieter type.
Washington, Oct. 21. - Secretary
Colby said today that the state de-
partment was determined to protect
the baggage of the diplomatic repre-
sentatives of foreign nations from
search by customs officials.
Mr. Colby would not say whether
the department would have recourse
to injunction proceedings, explaining
that the matter of protecting the lug-
gage of foreign envoys against exam-
ination by prohibition enforcement
agents remained to be determined.

In accordance with its established
custom, the University School of Mus-
ic will again present a series of com-
plimentary recitals on Sunday after-
noons in Hill auditorium. Programs
will be provided by members of the
faculties of the School of Music, by
the University orchestra, and on sev-
eral occasions the Varsity band will
assist in programs in which commun-
ity singing will be featured.
First Recital on Sunday
Th first recital in this series will
take place at 3 o'clock next Sunday
RRAGMNSPROCEED
FOR PR O BOUNCE
KNIGHT MIRRIELEES, GEORGE
RODERICK TO APPEAR IN
JOINT ACT
Proceeding with its plans for the
arrangement of an All-star program of
student talent, the committee in
charge of the Band Bounce, the date
of which has been set for Friday,
Nov. 5, not Nov. 15, as appeared in the
head of yesterday's story, on the night
preceding the Michigan-Ohio State
football game, has booked an act in
which two men who have won cam-
pus renown in previous vaudeville ex-
hibitions will participate.
Knight Mirrielees, '20E, who is
chairman of tonight's mass meeting,
will appear In the role of a modern
exponent of the art of terpsichore. He
will also sing several of the latest
popular song hits, with George H.
Roderiek, '21E, who wrote the music
for last year's Michigan Union opera,
"George Dit It," at the piano.
In addition to this attraction, the
Varsity band will be present in full
force. Four other vaudeville acts,
announcements of which are to be
made within a few days, will com-
plete the program.
Tickets for the Bounce will be put
on sale Wednesday, Oct. 27. John
Madden, '22E, has been appointed
chairman of the tickets committee,
and William Harrison, '21E, is in
charge of the advertising for the af-
fair.
Jennings flay
Lead Cornell
Ithaca, Oct. 21. - Hugh Jennings,
former manager of the Detroit base-
ball club, may be chosen as Cornell
baseball coach at the meeting of the
alumni baseball association called to
select a coach for next season.
Jennings, It was announced here
today, was expected to attend the
meeting. The former Detroiter is an
alumnus of Cornell and captain of
the baseball team in 1904.
..G. ,stsGL..d owo
'ENSIAN TO WAGE
SALES CAMPAIGN
With the aim that every student on
the campus have a year book, the
Michiganensian will launch its sub-
scription campaign Nov. 1. This cam-
paign will last but five days and no
subscriptions will be taken after
Nov. 5.
"We are going to put out a larger
book than has been attempted in the
past," stated Boyd Logan, '21, busi-
ness manager of the Michiganensian.
"There is to be more professional art
work and the space devoted to ath-
letics has been greatly increased; in

short, we are trying to make this the
biggest and best book.
"Illinois with a smaller enrollment
than our school has a sale of more
than 5,000 annuals. Michigan with
her larger student body should far
exceed this mark. It's up to the
students. The more students who
subscribe,the better year book we can
put out." The better the year book,
the moreinfluence the University will
have in the schools to which the Mich-
iganensian is sent, Logan declared.
Reimann Ill; Confined to Bed
Louis Reimann, '16, head of the
University Y. M. C. A. extension serv-
ice, and former Varsity football play-
er, has been ill for a week past. He
has been confined to his bed for two
days. It is thought that he has an
atack of malarial fever.

afternoon, Oct. 24, when a program
will be provided by William Wheeler,
head of the voice department, Albert
Lockwood, head of the piano depart-
ment, and Miss Marian Struble, a
member of the violin faculty.
Both Mr. Wheeler and Mr. Lockwood
are well known to Ann Arbor audi-
ences. Miss Struble is a graduate of
the University School of Music. Dur-
ing the war she traveled extensively,
giving freely of her services to patri-
otic work.
General Public 1nvit
The general public is cordially in-.
vited, but is requested to be seated
promptly at the hour of beginning as
the doors will be closed during the
performance of numbers. Patrons are
also requested to refrain from bring-
ing small children.
The program follows:
A Pine Tree Stands Forsaken....
A Flower Thou Resemblest......
Then and Now ................
The Three Gypsies ............ Liszt
Mr. William Wheeler
Gypsy Airs, Op. 20 ........ Sarasate
Romance, E minor ..........Sinding
Hungarian Dance, No. 7, A major
..................Brahms-Joachim
Miss Maran Struble.
Art .............. ...........Fox
One Year (1914-1915) ......Burleigh
In the Foggy Dew..........Loomis
Deep-Water Song............Brown
Mr. William Wheeler
Thirty-two Variations ....Beethoven
Harmonies Du Soir ............ Liszt
Invitation to the Trepak......
......................Tschaikovsky
Mr. Albert Lockwood.
MORE CLSSES NAME
NOMINEES__TO OFFICES
Yesterday's class nominees as re-
ported to the Student council for
senior and junior laws, and senior
engineers are as follows:
Senior laws - president, Turner
Rudesill and A. Bouchard; vice-pres-
ident, C.. E. Page and E. Martinek;
secretary, Ray Lewis and E. Zigler;
treasurer, G. P. Wolf and Clarence
Lott.
Junior laws - :presdent, James
Spier and Paul Gordon; vice-presi-
dent, R. Reavill and Joseph Morri-
son; secretary, Frank Eaton and Ed-
ward Davis; treasurer, R. Manwar-
ing and C. W. Clarke.
Senior engineers-president, Clar-
ence Johnson and A. Wetzel; vice-
president, Pat Van Wagner and Ross
Dillon; secretary, Larry Frost and
W. R. Harrison; treasurer, Barger
and Mark Covell; football manager,
Philip Beath and A. R. Reynolds.
Nominations for senior dents are-
president, R. F. Cannon and E. L.
Forsythe; vice-president, B. Weiss
and R. V. Chase; secretary, F. K..
Butler; treasurer, H. 0. Erbland.
Junior dents-president, C. W. Wil-
son and J. 0. Beavis; vice-president,
D. G. Hard and C. R. Buell; secre-
tary, M. D. Slaughter and F. W. Ran-
kin; treasurer, W. C. McBride and
C.. J. VanRoenan; and for athletic
manager, F. C. Naylor and F. W.
Thompson.
Freshman law class nominations
will be made Friday in room C, in-
stead of room G. Freshman engi-
neers will hold nominations of secre-
tary and treasurer at 5 o'clock Fri-
day in room 348, Engineering build-
ing.
CO-OPERATION IN
SOCITIES LACKING

Fraternity, Sorority Members Not Res.
ponding to Chimes' Appeal
To be more correct in its statement
about University women not signing
up as rapidly as they should for the
Chimes, the business staff of that pub-
lication stated that the independent
women have taken as many subscrip-
tions in ratio as the men. The soror-
ity women have not responded in the
manner that they should, according
to the Chimes men.
The answers to the letters that were
sent out to the fraternities, stating the
number of men from each house sub-
scribing have not come in as fast as
they should.
If the president of each house would
tend to this as soon as possible, it
would facilitate matters in the office,
the men there state.

DAILY TO PUBLISH
FOOTBALL EXTRA
With the determination to
break all records for the print-
ing of an extra, a special Daily
staff will issue the Illinois foot-
ball extra, which will be on sale
at the close of the game Satur-
day afternoon.
The extra will contain a run-
ning story of the game, a review
of the situation in the Confer-
ence, photographs of the Illin-
ois captain, Depler, Steketee,
Coach Pratt, and a group pic-
ture, the first to be released, of
the Michigan eleven.
In addition to these features
there will also be stories on
basketball, and a digest of the
football situation between Mich-
igan and Illinois sinee their first
game in 1898.
REMT TOO LATE1
200 LOSE SEATS
Tardy Coupons Received for Illinois
Game Forec Students to
Stand
SLIPS FOB CHICAGO CONTEST
ASKED FOR BEFORE FRIDAY
More than 200 students will be fore-
ed to stand up during the Illinois
game because they failed to send in
their coupons with applications for re-
served seats before the specified time,
6 o'clock Friday evening, Oct. 15.
Some of the orders received Satur-
day were filled as long as the tickets
lasted, however.
Approximately 60 per cent of the
23,000 seats in the stands are reserved
for students, and they are held until
all student applications, received on
time, are filled. This year the stu-
dent tickets were sorted out for mail-
ing Sunday, Oct. 17.
Late Applications Returned
Applications which were received
late were returned to the students
with a notice that the coupon would
entitle them to standing room on the
inclined platform at the west end of
the field.
"We regret that it was necessary to
do this," said P. G. Bartelme, athletic
director, in commenting on the late
applicants, "but we had thousands of
applications from alumni which we
could not hold up until the last mo-
ment to see how many more student
applications would straggle in. It the
students would only comply with the
instructions on the back of the blanks
there would be no difficulty whatever.
Students Given Attention
Aplications are filled in the order
of classes, except in the case of
graduatesstudents andstudents en-
tering the University with advanced
credit, who are ranked in accordance
with the number of years they have
spent here. When students of dif-
ferent classes sit together, the applic-
ation will be filled in the order of
the lowest class.
Very few Conference universities
extend as much consideration to stu-
dents in the seating arrangements of
the big games as Michigan does, ac-
cording to information obtainable at
the athletic office. In most cases the
best seats are reserved for outside
sale.
Want Chicago Blanks Early
Mr. Bartelme requests that the stu-
dents mail their coupons and blanks
for the Chicago game early enough to
insure their reaching the athletic of-
fice before 6 o'clock Thursday eve-

ning, Nov. 4.
In regard to choice Beating at the
Illinois game tomorrow, the situation
is as follows. In the south stands G
and H are opposite the 45 and 50 yard
lines, I and F opposite the 35 yard
line, J and L at the 25 yard line, K
and D at 10 yards, L and C at 5 yard
line, and A, B and M beyond the goal
posts.
The north stand seats are: KK, JJ,
and II at 45 and 50 yard lines. LL, HH
and GG at 35 yards, MM and FF at 30
yards, NN and EE at 25 yards, 00 apd
DD at 15 yards, PP and CC at 5 yards,
and RR. QQ, AA and BB beyond the
goal posts.
Pyrenees Feel Quakes
Toulouse,* France, Oct. 21.-Earth-!
quake shocks were felt yesterday in
several places in the Pyrenees de-
partment.

"BEAT ILLINOIS"9
SLOGAN AT'-PEF
NEW YELLS TO BE EXPLAI
BY CHEER LEADER A. 0
CUTHBERT
YOST, TEAM, FACULTY
ALUMNI TO BE PRESE:

Doors Will
conies

Open at 7 O'clock;
Reserved for Women
and Overflow

"Beat Illinois" will be the slog
of the big pep meeting tonight
preparation for thegame with Ill
nois tomorrow. Final plans have be
made and all is in readiness for ti
meeting. The .program as planni
will be short, the idea being to g
the meeting over- early so that t]
team will be 'able to get to bed earl
Mirrielees Chairman
Knight Mirrielees, '21E, will 1
chairman of the meeting and in add
tion is scheduled to make a sho
talk. Prof. John R. Brumm will 1
the faculty representative on the pr
gram and Fred Lawton, '11, will d
liver the alumni address.
Promptly at 7 o'clock the doors
the big auditorium will be thro
open and shortly afterward the ba
will come on the stage. While t
students are finding seats, the ba
will play several popular pieces
Football Team to Appear
The Varsity football team is r
quested to meet at the west entran
of the auditorium at 7:25 o'clock a
will be ushered to the seats reserv
for them in the front row while t
entire student body is singing tJ
"Vctors."
Individual slides of the Varsi
men are to be thrown on the scre
and also the words of the varioi
songs which will be sung. A.
Cuthbert, '21, recently appointed Va
sity cheer leader, will have charge
the cheering at the meeting and wi
explain some of the new yells whi
he plans to use on the field Saturda
Coach Yost will appear before t
student body with one of his chara
teristic talks.
The entire lower floor is to be r
served for the men students of ti
University, the balconies to be throv
open to the women and to the ove
flow of men. The entire affair shou
be over by 8:15 o'clock.
Three on Commttee
The committee in charge of a
rangements is as follows: G.
Johnson, '21E, chairman, George Du
field, '21, and R. W. Christie, '21.
FLAG TO BE LOWERED
AT GAMIE ON- SATUROI
"VICTOR" TO BE FOLLOWED I
PLAYING OF "YELLOW
AND BLUE"
Plans for lowering the flag on F
ry field to half mast at Saturda
game in honor of the Michigan m
who died in the World war have be
completed, according to L. A. Gain
president of the Student counciL
The system to be employed will
to have the band come onto the fie
playing the "Victors" in the us
manner, amrch to the other end
the field, and counter-march until
comes in front of the flag-pole. T
members of the band will then r
move their hats, the spectators w
stand with heads uncovered and t
first verse of the "Star Spangl
Banner" will be played. The flag w
then be lowered to half mast and t
band will play one verse of the "Y
low and Blue." This will compi
the ceremony.
In order that there be ample til
for this part of the program,. t
band must leave University hall
3:10 o'clock, Ann Arbor time.
The custom of lowering the flag w
inaugurated last year and was ci
ried out at all of the games.
Chemical Society to Hear KeAlp
R. K. McAlpine of the chemistry

partment will lecture at 4:15 o'clc
Tuesday afternoon in room 151 of C
Chemistry building, before the Univ
sity of Michigan section -of the Am
ican Chemical society.

UNION STILL NEGOTIATING
OBTAIN STUDENTS' TRAIN
TO COLUMBUS

TO

Negotiations for obtaining a spe-
cial rate to Columbus for the Ohio
State game Nov. 6 have not as yet
resulted successfully, but the Union,
is still trying to get the reduction;
from the passenger association,
Donald Thorpe, '21, chairman of the
committee, is in communication with!
the president of the association in an
effort to get his approval of the cut
rate. He expects a definite decisionj
within a few days.
If the reduction is not allowed, the
Union will still endeavor to get a
special train if enough students sign
up for the trip. Information in re-
gard to the sale of tickets will be'
published next Tuesday or Wednes-
day.
Guy Moulthrop, '22, Bert Uebele,j
'23E, and Donald McArthur, '23, are
the other mebers of Thorp's commit-
tee.
ENSIAN NOTICE
All organization heads should
call at the Michiganensian office
in Press building, between 2 and
4 o'clock any day this week and 1
sign contracts. To insure space
this should be done at once.
Fraternities and sororities arej
are requested to sign and re-
turn contracts immediately.

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