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May 08, 1921 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.i.

ARABLE TO "GROWTH'
[F THE SOIL," BY
HAMSUN I
(By R. D. S.)
gradual transformation of
k virgin soil into habitable
Earmlands lies an epic theme
tic simplicity but -universal
ce. Knut Hamsun has treat-
uibject with true artistry and
vth of the Soil" stands with
est novels the century has yet
. Now "Dust" (Brentano)
)m the pens of Mr. and Mrs.
n-Julius, two newcomers in
l of letters.
thors of this book have -suc-
a compressing' the' spirit of
ness and the choking cruelty
rimitive countryside into a
50 short pages-less than half
;h of Hamsun's work--of a

force and simplicity that beg for super-
latives.
"Dust" is a cruel book,, full of the
hopeless futility of life. Its hero is
a man whose soul has become so
parched by the spirit of dust that all
emotion, all passion-one might say
all feeling of any kind-have been
'utterly deadened, a man dull, method-
ical, practical-painfully, depressingly
practical.
Life means to him but two things,
the care of his farm and the making of
money; it is an unending process of
economy and investments to pile up
money-for what? Even he wonders
sometimes, and can- find no answer.

cherished of finding happiness.
With a tragic inevitability, the dust~
gradually sifts into her soul, too. Tired
of being baffled in every effort toward
pleasure or comfort, denied the lives
of her two sons, left hopelessly alone
without anyone to love or to love her,
she, too, becomes a victim of the soil.
The dust triumphs. She too has been
but a marionette in a cruel drama
managed by ruthless unseen forces. So
"Dust" ends, with the woman alone,
rich, but deadened to any desire for
the luxuries -her money can bring her
-the lonely victim of a ghastly mock-
ery.

To his work life means happiness.
"Happiness?" the farmer says per-
plexedly. It comes as a new thought,
something he had never considered be-
fore. Why should anyone want to be
happy? Work, that was the thing. His
total lack of all love or understand-
ing and his deadly effective insistence
on reducing every finer thing to com-
monplace practicality soon dispel any
lifigering hope that his wife may have

he May Victor RecordsI

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Siren of a Southern'Sea by All Star Trio and their Orch. '
AND MANY OTHERS NOT LISTED HERE

UP-TO-THE-MINUTE SERVICE

:N

Schaeberle & Son M ic House

110 S. Main St.

q

AeRICK

DAILY MATS. - - 2:20
NIGHTS - - 8:20
SUNDAY MATS.- 3:00

THIS WEEK

METRO OFFERS'

Seen On The
Stage --- Screen
(By Edwin R. Meiss)
Lionel Barrymore plays at the Ma-
jestic today in "Jim the Penman," re-
viving on the screen a melodrama
which has played upon the English
stage for a generation. Barrymore
takes the part of a deft bank cashier
who uses his skill at forgery to save
his employer from prison, and in
order to escape detection himself is
forced to join a professional band of
forgers. The tense situations result-
ing from this motivation yield an
abundance of dramaticm aterial which
Barrymore handles with the utmos,
skill.
* * *
A rather silly farce with a loose plot
is the vehicle of Mr. and Mrs. Carter
DeHaven at the Arcade today. The
picture, entitled, "The Girl in the
Taxi," is adapted from the stage play
by Stanislaus Strange. It deals with
a young man who by a ,series of in-
discreet actions disproves the name
"mollycoddle" which his business-like
father has applied to him.
A unique experiment in the movie
realm has been carried out by First
National in the- screen version of
James Whitcomb Riley's classic of
boyhood, "The Old Swimmin' Hole."
This picture with Charles Ray in the
lead, has been screened completely
without the use of a single subtitle,
the actions of the characters being in-
tended to explain themselves. The
photography is well done, and while
the result of the experiment is not
altogether successful, still the attempt
is worth while to develop a photo-play
which makes the audience do a bit of
the thinking and not have every move-
ment explained in words. "The Old
Swinnin' Hole" is scheduled at the
Majestic for the latter half of the
week.
*'a* *
"Sowing the Wind," the second
melodrama of the week, with Anita
Stewart playing the star role, appears
at the Arcade on Wednesday. The story
is intricate and, jumbled, dealing with
unknown mothers, anxious fathers,
and forgotten children. The love
theme.runs, or rather dashes, through-
out the play (in what movie does it
not?), and after many separations and
hosts of intrigues the two sweethearts
are finally brought together for good,
and thenthe fade-out fades. This pic-
ture is well produced and 'exciting,
but could scarcely be termed enlight-
ening.T
Lane Hall Helps
Students Imp rove
TheShiningHours
(By Martin A. Hlaver)
If you are an artist's model, a movie
operator, a blacksmith, an hostler, or
an undertaker, and you want an out-
let for your talents (with a considera-
tion; of course) try the employment
bureau at Lane Hall. They can place
you in your element if anyone can, and
you know Carlyle's extra beatitude:
"Blessed is the man who has found
his work."
Some 1,347 jobs have been given out
by the S. C. A. this year. Of these 298.
were permanent board jobs, 61 tempo-
rary of the same kind, 127 were steady
cash positions, 151 were opportunities
to earn room-rent, and 710 were mis-
cellaneous temporary jobs. Cooks,
butchers, barbers, clerks, chauffeurs,

mechanics, salesmen, stenographers,
and janitors were all given work.
Gardening, cleaning, apple-picking,
ditch-digging, corn-cutting, painting,
window washing, and furniture moving
were included among the odd jobs
which were given to students.
Fill Places Satisfactorily
According to Miss M. D. Notley, who
is in charge of the bureau, the stu-
dents fill their places satisfactorily in
nearly every case. Foreign students
are at first somewhat awkward and[
inexperienced, but their willingness
and ability to learn soon overbalances
this difficulty. Local people who reg-
ularly employ students to work .for

them are beginning to ask for the for-
eigners, usually the requests being
made for the men who have worked
for them before.
During the months of January and
February the general depression in
business affairs was felt at the em-
ployment bureau, for very few stu-
dents were given work during that
time. Since the rate of pay has been
lowered from 50 cents to 40 cents, and
since spring has brought to light lawns
and gardens which demand care, no
difficulty has been met in supplying
students with work. Lately, due to
lack of applications, work has been
given to some townspeople who are
out of employment.
Year's Total, $93,865
The value of these jobs has been-
estimated to be $93,865 for the year so
far. Last year the total for the entire
year-amounted to $95,400.80. Comdiar-
ing conditions and taking into consid-
eration the increased value of the dol-
lar, it is evident that more work has
been done this year than last.
BOYS GET AIRPLANE RIDE FOR
LEARNING SERMON ON MOUNT
Chanute, Kan.-For committing to
memory the lofty precepts of the Ser-
mon on the. Mount, eight boys in a
Presbyterian Suniday school here were
taken to material heights in reward.
James Hodgens Smith, a lieutenant
in the aviation service during the war,
teacher of the class, gave the bbys an
airplane ride.
PROMISE GOOD 1921 SUPPLY OF
GREAT$ARES WHEAT VESSELS
Chicago.-Ample supply of shipping
for grain will be available on the
Great Lakes this year, marking a
change from several previous seasons

Young People's meeting at the
church at 5:45, and 6:30, as
usual.
A Cordial Welcome to All!

cording to vesselmen of Chicago. The
change is attributed to the falling off
in the steel business, which will make
smaller demand on the ore boats
which form the bulk of the lake traffic.
GOVERNOR McCARTHY FAVORS
SURVEY OF HAWAIIAN WATERS
Hoyiolulu, T. H.--(Correspondence
of the Associated Press.)-Charles J.
McCarthy of Hawaii will ask the leg-

Sunday, May 8, 1921

I

+'-;

priation of $25,000 to be us
ing the completion of a thou
vey of the waters surroun
Hawaiian group. It is exp(
the federal government w
the expense.
Navigators have pointed
peatedly that many danger
in Hawaiian waters were ut

ANN ARBOR
BIBLE CHAIR

FIRST
BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St., Below State
J. M. WELLS, MINISTER
321 East Ann Sreet

I

when the supply has been

Headquarters in Lane Hall.

smaller, ac-

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Church 'difice, 409 S. Division

10:30 A. M.-Mother's Day Ser-
vice. Sermon by Rev. J. M.
Wells. "Mary and Modern
Mothers."
12:00 M.-Guild Class at Guild
House.
Men's Forum at Church. Sub-
ject: "What Should We Do
About Our Modern Industrial
Situation"
6:30 P. M.-Guild Meeting.

Classes meet in the "Upper
Room."
Upper Room Bible Class Sat-
urday evenings. University
Men's Bible Class Sunday
morning.
Ask for printed circular an-
nouncing six courses.
Read the Upper Room Bulletin.
THOMAS M. ,[DEN,
Instructor.

10:40 A. M.-Sermon unan-

UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Sts.
SIDNEY S ROBINS, Minister

nounced.

Sunday services at 10:30 A. M.
The, subject will be:' "Adam
and Fallen Man." Testimonial
meeting Wednesday evening at
7:30. A cordial invitation is ex-
tended to all. Sunday School at
11:45 A. M., tQ which pupils un-
der 20 years may be admitted.
A public reading room, 236 Nick
els Arcade, is open daily, except
Sundays and holidays, from 12
to 5 o'clock.

#_ nbren's ,Eistpal
Cor. Catherine and Division Sts.
Rev. Henry Tatlock, D.D., Rector
Rev. Charles T. Webb, Curate
7:35 A. M.-Holy-.Communion.
10:30 A. M. --- Morning Prayer
and Sermon by the Rector,
"Honor Thy Father and Thy
Mother."
4:30 P. M.-Evening Service and
Address by the Curate, "How
Letters Found a Place in the
Christian Bible."

U.r

I

I

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

4

STODAY'SCHURCH SERVICES

,.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
DISCIPLES

it

I

DR. HENRY MARTIN McCANDLISS,
Chief Surgeon Presbyterian Hospital,
Hainan, China
will give the address at 10 :30.

I

;'

South University Ave.

~INCENTE BLASCO IBANEZ'

12:00 Noon-Prof. W. D. Henderson will give his second address an
' What Students Should Read," a talk on the world's
best' literature.
6:30 P. M.4-"Mother's Day," Turzah Roberts, leader, Young People's'

The.

HORSEMEN
of the APOCALYPSE

9:30 A. M.-Bible School.
Maurice Taylor, Supt.
10:30 A, M.-Mother's Day Ser-
vice.
6:30 P. M.-C. ER
7:30 P. M.-"Conversion: What
is it?" will be the evening
subject.
F. P. ARTHUR, Pastor
Classes for Students

Society.

I"

"em

r: . ;

I

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
REV. ARTHUR W. STALHER, D.D., Pastor
MISS ELLEN W. MOORE, Student Director

Sunday, May $, 1921

t.

x

"The, Highest Mark in Motion Picture Making."
-Detroit News
)SHUBER TT This Week'
IE T R 0Mats.'Daily at 2:1IFpfter Sunday
SpecialLimited Engagement
D.'W. GRIFFITH'S
UNEXAMPLED WONDER OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY."
-Boston Herald.

WAY

"Finest Pve
Ever Seen."
-Howard
Chandler
Christy

9F:30 A
ttlt lt!ttttttitlttilIittt, ,.10:30 A
-12:00 N~
TRINITY LUTHERAN 6:001
- 6:30P
CHURCH
_ 7:30 F
Fifth Ave. and William St. = SPECI
leis
er
Lig
9:30 A. M.-Sunday School.
10:30 A. M.-Special services
for Mothers' Day. Rev. Lloyd
Merl Wallick, the Lutheran
student pastor, will preach.
- ZION LUTHERAN _S
CHURCH t ister-
Fifth Ave. and Washington St. .
REV. E. C. STELLHORN,
Pastor
U
profe
Soap and culture, money and eThis
society, may do much for a man .= one o
-but - Jesus alone can save Congr
man from sin, and make him E
fit to company with God and C
angels.tOh, the heed of magni- D
fying the Christthe C
10:30 A. M.-A pre-confirmatipn perso
service.Ms.
C I Mrs.+
7:30 P. M.-"Love's Privileges
- and Opportunities." -
- Both services English.
Qastill6Cigi¬Ędfll l lit IIb1Q8ll lltilill 9l IIf

M.-"Jesus' Principles of Living," Bible Class. Leader, Mr.
d 'Clair Searles.
A. M. "MOTHER'S DAY", Pastor's subject.
Voon. Four Bible Classes for students, Lane Hall.
. M. Social half hour for the young people.
P. M. Subject: "Mother's Day." Bring a mother! Mr. Ross
Fox, Leader.
P. M. "THIl PERSONAL RELIGION OF FREDERIC AMIEL"
Pastor's subject.
AL MUSIC for the day: "May the words of my Mouth" (Bur-
gh); "God hath appointed a day" (Tours), the Chorus; "Moth-
o' Mine" (Kipling-Tours), Mr. Wheeler; "Oh Trinity of Blessed
ght" (West), "Prayer Perfect" (Stenson), Miss Howe.
'ERY STUDENT INVITED TO ATTEND THE SERVICES
ONGREGATION AL CH URk~H

DOWN
EAST

orning Worship 10:30 o'clock.
ervices appropriate to Mother's Day will be held.
will speak upon the subject:
"THE RE--APPRAISAL OF MOTHER'S DAY."

The min-

ork of
b Art."
oklyul

"Worth Ten
Dollars a Seat."
-N. Y. Herald

GREATEST SPECTACLE EVER SEEN ON LAND OR SEA"
-New York Globe.A
Selected Orchestra of 80 Symphony Playe s *
TS ON SALE TOMORROW MAIL ORDERS NOW
-Nights and Sat. Mat.: Orch., $1.50 & $2; Bal., $1 & $1.34;
Gal., 'Oc. All Other Mats.: Entire Orch., $1; Balcony, 50c
and $1; Gal., 25c."-
ALL SEATS RESERVED '
-Owing to cost, length of production and iron-bound contracts
"Way Down East" will never be shown at less than first-

Jniversity Student Forum 12:00 o'clock. Dr. Henry H. Walker,
ssor of Church History in the Uni ersity of Chicago, will
: "Contributions of the Pilgrim Fath to American Life."
is the first opportunity that our students have had of hearing
f our denominational leaders speak upon the unique place the
regational churches hold in the religious life of America.
ongregational Students' Association 6:30 o'clock.
During the remaining Sunday evenings of the University year
"ongregational students will be given an opportunity to meet
nally the faculty members who are affiliated with this church.
Chas. H. Eaton will speak: "The American Mother," and
Chas. G. Wolcott will' sing.

'

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