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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 08, 1921 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

. N A,1P9'', !AI SI.,',,,PN
moreCritic Praised
aily:- still did the writer of the editorial
e of The Daily I have the right to commit The Daily it-
. and delivered self? I question if he did.
igned himself Quoted Eminent Critics
ose article ap- "Menckenite" substantiated his
le. claims of Mencken's merit by quoting
es are on the some very eminent writers and critics.;
writer. After Then, what does the editor do; noth-
ecame a more ing less than to say that one man's
ken than ever; opinion of Mencken, or the opinions
odal editorial I of many men will hardly carry as any
tero-worship of real argument. But the one man who
. Had the edi- wrote the editorial, I presume, is a
hts of drinking celestial caitiff who does carry real
'ced to espouse weight. I fear he must be more con-
ohibition. vincing than that; I fail to see tbat he
krgue is any better than Waldo Frank, James.
rst place, com- Huneker, or any of the others men-
s opinions, and tioned.
Surely the edi- Then the editor turns to what a pro-
place for argu- fessor in rhetoric things of one of

(By E. H X .)
THE ICHIGAN OF OLD
One night some time ago I dreamed
And in my troubled sleep I seemed
To be back in the past;
With many classes, nineteen 'leven,
Eighty-six and ninety-seven,
My lot in turn was cast.
I thought with glee of all the tales,
Of football games and bar-room rails,
Of never ending praise;
I waited for a real treat,
The romance of a past so sweet,
Back in those golden days.
I found the Michigan of old,
The one of which I have been told
Since Hector was a pup;
I saw the famous things I knew
From hearsay and tradition, too,
A few we've given up.
I found out ere the night was spent,
No matter how far back I went,
I always heard the cry:.
"Where is the Michigan of old?
Her spirit fast is growing cold;
Bring back the days gone by."
And so, in looking back, my friends,
Swift time in passing gently tends
To blot out faults and flaws;
Though sorrows at some times were
keen, r
These all are faded from the scene
Which memory redraws.
Old timers, then, are not too blame,
They can't forget the former fame,
They have to make a fuss;
And Freud has given me the hunch
That in ten years the student bunch
Will hear the same from us.

Contemporaries,
Young and Old,{
In Same Office
(By Paul Watzel)
In celebrating an anniversary many
institutions fail to look about and see
what others have done that is worthy
of attention and comment. This is en-
tirely natural, for at such a time there
is little notice given to the others.
However, it is often well to con-
sider what these institutions have
been and are 'doing.
Grouped in a room with the edito-
rial and business staffs of The Daily
are many publications that have made
places for themselves in the lives of
the University students. They all"
serve in different capacities, serve dif-
ferent masters, so to speak. They are
of varied types and perform varied
functions. Their purposes may be to
furnish accurate but colorless infor-
mation, to give a resume of the col-
lege year in an interesting form, to
comment upon the phases of Univer-
sity life with a view to betterment,
or to present the mere trivial side of
academic life.
Have Proved Worth
But whatever their purpose or their
function, we have in them institutions
that have established themselves by
proving their worth. We recognize
them as being parts of the general
plan of University life.
Soon we are to see the twenty-fifth'
volume of the Michiganensian. In
this will be represented the results.
of years of experience with former
volumes. It has become an institu-
tion, the abolition of which no one now
will argue. In its elaborate descrip-
tions of the athletic and social events
of the year, in its short but complete

records of the men and women who
have successfully done the work pre-
scribed by the University, in its func-
tion of giving credit where credit is
due, it gives us something that is
worth while, something that we feel
is necessary.
Chimes, the most recently estab-
lished publication upon the campus,
fills a niche that would indeed be
vacant were it not for that magazine.
Its capacity is to be "all-campus," to
discuss problems, to present solutions,
to give opinions.
Directly the opposite is the Gar-
goyle, with its preference for the tri-
vial.. Wit and humor, so prevalent
among college men, finds its outlet
here. Compared with the Michigan-
ensian, the magazine of fun is still in
its infancy, but it has shown its pe-
culiar function, and has shown it to
advantage.
Wolverine in Summer
During the summer months The
Daily steps aside and allows a pub-
lication of a different name to carry
on with the work of furnishing news
to the campus. The Wolverine, for
the past eleven years, has found those
attending summer school of the opin-
ion that it should continue.
A list of names, addresses and tele-
phone numbers is as drab a thing as
can be conceived, but the Student
Directory fills a different need than
the othei' publications. Perhaps it is
the most used, the most referred to,
of any.
The Athletic Program is the servant
of the student when he steps inside
Ferry Field. Many of us do not real-
ize that the program is a true pub-
lication, in every sense of the word.
There are three publications that
are not classed with those mentioned
above. The Michigan Law Review,
The Michigan Technic, and The Mich-

cluded
varying

In closing, for the
completeness it migh
tion one strictly un
So far it seems to
publication, but-?
voted to the cultiva
tastes, makes it appe
expected occasions.
unknown, and we ref
"Box 147."
We find these inst
ence for the carry
spirit and life at thi

NOMINEE'

v

r or against Mencken,
ason that they are no
or against the Repub-
rat parties.

Mencken's books. The opinion of one
man again; surely that will carry no
weight as an argument.
But I must stop and wipe the tears
.from my ev_ s

er

of the editorial ex- l yey
of the men on The - G.
[ng a half dozen of
found that they held JAPS' HIGH COST OF LIE:
view. Did he ex- - IS HIGHEST. OF AL
n of the campus? Tokio.-Comparison of the
n I have talked to daily necessities, such as bre
ositely. Did he ex- milk, sugar, butter and vege
ns of the faculty? England, America and Japan
over a score of pro- the highest prices are paid
uctors whom I have says the Osaka Mainichi.
e one held the oppo- High cost of the necessari
attributed to the many midc
there are an equal- lack of proper storage faci
s on the other side, to high transportation costs.

EATON.
ING
L, CLAIM
e prices of
ad, meats,
etables, in
will show'
in Japan,l
es here is
dlemen, to
lities, and

(Continued from Pag
Dewey F. Fagerburg, '2
didates for Publircations 1
Edmund H. Fox, '22E
dates for engineering vi
Union.
PRESIDENT ENGINI
SOCIETY
George E. Gregory, '
council; Union dance
Union election commit
Opera committee; Michig
1918-19; Technic advertis:
1919-20.
Arthur D. Stauffer, '22E
social committee (2); T
assistant football manage
Increase your business
tug in, The Michigan Da
Want anything? If you
you want, when you wa
Want Ad in the Michigan

MMMMWA 1

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TODAY

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MONDAY
TUESDAY

U

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Hang on to your Hut

STARTING TODAY
LI+oNEl

Steer im
clear of-

r
. r _ . ..
J t
,i
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p , k.
h ' ' i i
if ' ' Ip

---

11

K'

a

in the celebrated stage success

I

THE

PENMAN"

isI1

r

America's Greatest Actor in a Thrilling Drama of
Love, Romance and Adventure in High Finance
ADDITIONAL
"GOING T HRU THE RYE"
A1 Christy Comedy iAith Dobby Vernon
It's the Merriest Farce Since j rohibition,
Yet There's Not a Dry Moment In It.

y - -.. - " a
9 - " L- -_

i

She'll beat him, cheat him, eat him out of a year's pay in one hour.
She's Broadway's wickedest vamp-with a pile of style and a mile of
guile. !
She'll run him right to Reno and use your marriage certificate to start a'
bonfire with his bankroll.

7

Orchestra

Travelogue

MASONIC BAND CONCERT.
TUESDAY EVENING MAY 10TH'

The license plate doesn't mean the number of the taxi, but the number
of happy homes she's busted.
BRING YOUR SHOCK ABSORBE
You'll need 'em on this mile-a-minute joy-ride with
Mr. and Mrs. CARTER DEHAV

COMING WEDNESDAY

Stanislaus Strange made it peppy as a play, and in movies
it's a blues-banisher

___A______i .-'_______

A FIRST

ME

NATIONAL
ATTRACTION

LAUGHS

TAXI DOES

AND ANOTHER TOONERVILLE SERIES
"THE SKIPPER'S SCHEME" - ALL LAUGHS

IN-

KINOGRAMS

ARCADE ORCI-

"THE OLD SWIMMIN'

HOLE"

COMING WEDNESDAY
ANITA STEWART IN "SOWING TJ

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