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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 06, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I I-IL awaa'...i.xrsUA LJa'fmaL

FICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
shed every morning except Monday during the Univer-
by the Board in Control. of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
ion of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
a this paper and the local news published therein.
ed at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ter.'
ription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
a: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
a : Business, g6o ; Editorial, 1414.
unications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
necessarily to appear in paint, but as an evidence of
notices of events will hbe published in The Daily at the
of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
communications will receive no consideration. No man
11 be returned unless the writer incluses postage.
Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentimet toe
the communications.
s Going On" notices will not be recerved after 8 o'clock
ning preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
NG EDITOR ..,.GEORGE 0. BROPHY JR
or ......Chesser M 'amvbel
Editorial Board. .....................Lee Woodruff
tors-
H. Adams .wHitchcock
1. Dakin 3 .McManis
enaud Sherwood r. W. Sargent, Jr
itor............................... A. Bernstein
...........B. P. Campbell
T. J. Whinery, L. A. Kern, S T. Beach
........ ... Robert Angell
Editor.-............................Mary D. Lane
...........Thomas Dewey
....... .jack W. *Kelly

. Assistants
FrankBH. McPike
J. A. Bacon
W. W. Ottaway
Paul Watzel
Byron Darnton
M. A. Klaver
E. R. Meiss
Walter Donnelly
Beata Hasley
Kathrine Montgomery

undy
rholtzer
dams
Elliott

Sidney B. Coates
C. T. Pennoyer
Marion B. Stahl
Lowell S. Kerr
Marion Koch
Dorothy Whipple
Gerald P. Overton
Edward Larmbrecht
Sara Waler
H. . Howlett

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER..........LEGRAND A. GINES, JR.
Advertising................. ...---- .------. P. Toyce
Classifieds.......................- -S. Knstadter
bl1 ation..................F. M, .eath
"ccounts. E~. R. Priehs
Circulation........... ..................V. F. Hilery
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecht M. M. Moule H. C. Hunt
H.3.lamel, Jr. N. W. Robertson M. S. Goldring
S-tH.Huthinson Thos. L. Rice H. W. Heidbreder
F. A. Cross R. G. Burchell W. Cooley
Robt."F+:Davis A. J.Parker
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should e the night editor, who has full charge
«fll news to be printed that'night.
FRIDAY, MAY 6, 1921.
Night Editor-M. B. STAHL.
A "BIG TEN" EDITORIAL UNION
Nobody on a college campus should keep better
informed of the trend of student thought than the
editor of a student publication. News, coimuni-
catidns, editorials, humor, complaints, campaigns,
exchanges, all of necessity pass before him every
day. He knows, if he has judgment, when campus
ideas are trending in the wrong direction, and meets
the situation through publicity. If he is progres-
sive, he endeavors to improve his own paper and
his college by finding out wherein other schools are'
better and incorporating their improved methods.
Furthermore, he tries to foster the right kind of
intercollegiate spirit.
To assist all the editors of the ten Conference
schools - whether of news, literary, opinion, or
comic publications - in the carrying out of their
duties, Michigan has invited them to attend the first
convention of 'a Conference Editorial association,
which will be organized in Ann Arbor Ma 20
and 21.
By rotating the conventions in succeeding years
among the ten universities of the Big Ten, the plan
makes it "possible for this group of campus leaders
to know and understand each other, get an idea of
the excellencies of student achievements outside
their own university spheres, and exchange views
on common problems. Failure to get: together this
way in the past has certainly been responsible for a
large share of the unfortunate misunderstandings
which have made for unfriendly feeling. Each
school will naturally strive to be at its best in en-
tertaining the delegates, and a real Conference fel-
lowship may well be engendered through this asso-
ciation.
Thrashing-out of numerous differences of opinion
such as that now existing on the question of ath-
letic eligibility will be made possible and the common
decisions reached will be supported by all. Every
university will be able to learn fully, through the re-
port of its editors printed in their publications, how
better methods of student government may be in-
stituted on its campus. Best of all, the good feel-
ing arising from the meetings will be transmitted
to each Conference university, there to take root
annually through the columns of its papers.
NEWSPAPER IDEALS VS. INCOME
Many newspapers throughout the country seem
to have lost sight of the fact that they have a duty
to perform toward the public. They forget that the
newspaper is an institution formed and fostered for
the purpose of disseminating news, real news, to its
readers; that its aim primarily should not be de-
voted toward the increasing of circulation. No
doubt the business side is an important department,
and its needs must be fulfilled. But all too fre-
quently they are fulfilled at the expense of real
journalism, and the promoters of the publication
become so utterly absorbed in the greedy following
of ever-increasing subscription lists that the posi-
tion of the sheet as a factor for good in the commu-
nity is practically lost sight of among the mount-
ing columns of income figures.
Newspapers and publications of all kinds might
do well to set up and follow some such motto as we

find on the title page of one of our art magazines
which proclaims itself to be devoted to "better art,
better work, and a better and more reasonable way
of living." In short, we need more idealism in the
journalistic field, an appreciation of the finer things
of life and an effort to put them before the'people.
There is still room for the dreamer in journal-
ism - too much room.
THE FESTIVAL'S CHORUS
The spectacle - and the musical effect - of the
banked Choral union of students co-operating with
the greatest artists of the operatic world in the ren-
dition of massed-voice selections from such popular
works as "Aida" and "Carmen" has always been
one of the main charms of the May festival. There
is an artistic democracy about this utilizing the solo
effects of world-famed voices in an intelligent con-
junction with the individually mediocre but collec-
tively effective tones of the student chorus; a sense
of musical teamwork, mounting above the personal.
Since the joining of the Choral union with the
festival in 1893, the importance of the choral fac-
tor has naturally been underestimated through the
necessity of advertising by means of famous names.
The great amount of work done by Prof. A. A.
Stanley and his predecessors is evidenced by the
fact that the Choral union .since its organization has
given three hundred eighteen concerts.
Though this year's festival - Dr. Stanley's
last - will be a final tribute to the organizing abil-
ity of a man who has given the best part of his life
to Michigan music, the securing of stars for the
principal parts should not 'rightly stand out as his
principal achievement. The splendid training given
and the, musical interest aroused through the union
of student singers will stand, this year as before, as
the best symbol of his ability to combine and har-
monize local and outside talent.
TAKE YOUR HEALTH EXAM
The movement now under way to extend the priv-
ilege of physical examinations to every man on the
campus is certainly an excellent one. Numbers of
sophomores, however, apparently failing to appre-
ciate the opportunity offered them for determining
their ?physical standing, are not keeping their ap-
pointments.
Out of college, unattended by all such advantages,
a man will pay a considerable sum to discover his
actual bodily condition, and we who have here the
chance to get that same kind of advice regularly
every year, without charge, are certainly doing our-
eslves an injustice if we fail to make use of the
service.
Next year the juniors on the campus will be in-
cluded; the year following that, the seniors. But
for the present let every man now in his second year
of residence seriously consider the opportunity of-
fered him, and keep his Health service appoint-
ment.
The editor of Telescope will have to make a lot
of mental retractions when he mounts the Gargoyle
throne next year.
Show some pride in Michigan's campus - keep
off the grass!
~~IThe Telescope
WANTED - Employment-. in sideshow or
circus by tattooed man. - ad. in Chicago paper.
Sort of idle curiosity, eh?
Who Could Blame Him?
He stood before the portal,
Five minutes good and more,
While every female mortal
Went filing through the door.
A 'smile, a graceful nod
Would him have satisfied;
But when one murmured, "Thank you",
He then laid down and died.

The author of the article "What Man Gets Out
of College" forgot among other things to mention
the fact that it teaches the dads of these men to save
money.
Dear Noah:
How can I get more money from my husband
without always asking for it? r Mary aid.
About the only thing we can suggest is to get a
good lawyer and divorce him,
Who Said Boulevardf
This is the happy spring time,
It comes but once a year;
But when it comes - make no mistakes,
The students know it's here.
The Height of Ignorance
"Does your girl know anything about baseball?"
"Absolutely nothing; why she even thought the
umpire might have been right when he gave a deci-
sion against the home team."
An Epitaph
The freshman stood on State street,
He didn't hear the car.
They placed him in a pill box
And sent him to his Ma.
Famous Closing Lines
"A stiff course," wheezed the medic as he entered.
the dissecting room.
NOAH COUNT.

BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK
Open Evening During Sale

t

DETROIT UNITED LNES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:051a. i.,
8:10 a. mn., and hourly to 9:10 p. mn.
Limiteds toJackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and eery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:60 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

Do You Need Extra Courses?

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English,
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics,
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire
how credits earned may be applied on present college program.
HOME STUDY DEPT. CHIGO. ILLIN

l

IL

1921
S M
1 2
8 9
12 16
22 24
29 30

ANNUAL BOOK SAL

T
3
10
17
24
81

MAY
w
4
11
18
25.

T
12
19
26

F
6
13
20
27

1921
S
14
21
28

I

ESTABLISHED 1818
MADISON AVENUE COR. FORTY-FQURT$H STREET
Telephone Murray Hill 88oo
Our representative will be at the
HOTEL STATLER, DETROIT
To-day and Tomorrow
May 6 and 7

I

-AT

PANAMAS
We Clean, Bleach 'nd Block
Panamas., etc., into the Late
Shapes, with all new trimmings
to look just like new. We don't
use any acids and do only High
Class Work. Factory Hat Store,
617 Packard St. Phone 1792.

I

with samples of Ready-made Clothing
Furnishings, Hats and Shoes
for Spring
Send for "Clothes and the Hou'r"

80ST9ON
fRIP0QI4TcpR. P9YL-qTP"

NEWPORT
220 SKLLUME AVENH

S U RA NEW NARROW
Ouett.Peabody &Co.inc.Troy. N.Y.

11

A ter.. -i
__

f

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For pure, delicious
candy perfection, try
a Burpee chocolgtp
covered nougat bar.

III

TODAY AND SATURDAY

-

I

, -A
;,
p
I,

"You dgn't hate Ine--
You love el"
But the words that
burst from the 1?4s-
siontFlower's lips told
a far differest sory.

Sf and 10c
at your 40aler's

w

c .. -

United Ciga
Store Prices
Prince Albert, Velvet,
Edgeworth, Serene
16 oz. tins
$1.45, Jars $1.60
Omars 100s $1.15
Lord Salisbury 100s
$1.00
Peter Schuyler PaS1e!
telas, 2 for 25c
Dry Slitz Stogies
5 for 20
Polick Stogies 4-15
and Se straight
La Palina 2-25c and
15c straight
Imported Clay Pipes
5c each
Pipe Cleaners 2-5c
Italia $ Pipes Cut To
50c
W. D. C. Milans, Pipes
$3,50x
B. B. B. Pipes $2900
$2.75 While They
Last
We treat you right.
118 East Huron Street

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, aka
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-'-I. ~ -

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SEPH . SCHENCK presents
NOR MA TALMADGEF

as the Spanish beauty for whese ursts an fil
in Jacinto Benavente's vivid play
Thj e PASSION FLO WER
You'll smile with her smiles, sob with her sobs,
love with her love, hate with her hate.
DIRECTED BY HERBERT BRENON
COMEDY - "HOLY SMOKE"
ADDED - KINOGRAMS-BRAY COMIC
COMING SUNDAY
" THE GIRL IN THE TAXI "

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