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October 21, 1920 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-21

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if

It. AN

L

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer.
r year by theBoard in Controlof Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
rnblication of all news dispatches credited to it or not etherwise
dited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
es matter.
Subscription by carrier or mal, $3.5o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press b iding, Maynard Street.
Phonee: Business 96, EditCria, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
ure not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidenceef
th and notices of evets will be published in The Daily at the
crotion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Dilgr office.
signed communications will receive no consideration. No man-
4r t will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
sod in -the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
the evening preceding insertion.
BDITORIAL STAF
Telephone 1114
LWAGING EDITOR.............GEORGE o. BROPHY JR.
wa Editor............................Chesser M. Campbell
T.. H. Adams H. W. Hitchock
B. P. Campbell J. $. McManis
J. . Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
day Editor ............ ....J. A. Bernstein
torilas............ Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, T. J. Winery
.......... ........Robert Angell
-men's Editor...-.... - ........... ..Mary D. Lane
egraph .................. . .............West Gallogly
Assistants
phine Waldo Robert D. Sage L. Armstrong Kern
if G. Weber FrancesOberholtzer Huston H McBain
iena ,Barloiv - Robert E. Adams Frank H. McPike
:abeth Vickery Norman C. Damon Gerald P. Overton
E, Clark Byron Darnton Edward Laabrecht
rge Reindel Thomas E. Dewey William H. Riley Jr.
.othy Monfort Wallace P.s >rliott Sara Waller
ry B._ Grundy' Leo J.' Hershdorfer
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
SINESS MANAGER .........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
ertisng... .....D. P. Joyce
'its . ....... .....................J. W. Rawlings
)lfiaion ..................... .....F. M. Heath
*stant News.... ...........:: .......iE. P Lovejoy Jr.
*onts........'.........................E. R. Priehs
ulation ................................... FHillery
scope....... ..............Jack W. Key
Assistants
W. Lambrecht B. G.Gower Lester W. Millard
*rt O. Kerr Sigmund Kunstadter
[he night editors for the week will be as fol-
rs: Monday night, Jack Dakin; Tuesday night,
ornton Sargent; Wednesday night, Brewster
mpbell; Thursday night, Hugh Hitchcock; fri-
night, Thomas Adams; Saturday night, John
Manis.
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
e of .The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
11 news to be printed that night.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1920.
KNOW [OUR UNIVERSITY
he Law school was provided for in the Organic
of March, 1859. Professor Campbell was
sen* as dean and his first class graduated in
e, i1860. At frst only the degree of LL.B. wa.s
n, but now LL.M., J.D., and the honorary de-
e of LL.D. are bestowed.
COATS' OFF !
riday night Hill auditorium is to be the scene
ne of the biggest demonstrations of pep ever
ed in the history of the University, a regular,
time, rousing, lay-for-Illinois pep meeting.
he doors will be open at 7 o'clock, y1ll leader
band will be present, and all the preliminaries
be provided. Two speakers have been secured,
f. John R. Brumm of the rhetoric department
Fred Lawton of Detroit. They need no introut-
.to the campus; anyone who has heard them
ws that they will do their share, and do it well.
Beat Illinois" is going to b the slogan of this
tts-off" demonstration of Michigan loyalty.
prcgram will be short and snappy, but come
y, and come prepared to yell! The team will
here to hear.
ight 'em, Michigan ! Every Michigan throat be-
I the Maize and Blue.
ON PICKING OFFICERS

a a few days the campus will be casting its vote
class officers. Unfortunately there has been
ndency of late years -toward letting these elec-
s drift into haphazard affairs where friend-
and petty politics play a more important part
1 real worth.
he choice of these officers should be made with
pulous care. They represent their fellow stu-
:s in all class dealings and the welfare of the
s lies in their hands. Consequently they should
be chosen blindly.
fe' must make it our task this year to look over
men and women nominated, find out what they
done on the cainpus, what other people think
hem, how much real ability they pbssess, and,
vote intelligently.
PAGE THE ARK
eading cheers disguised as the school mascot is
no'velty introduced by the resourceful yellmas-
>f Columbia, who appeared in a recent game
ed in a lion's skin. If the idea is caught up
ughout the United States we may expect some
-esting and entertaining results.
aimals hitherto hunted to death by man will
i unmolested on the football field. Yale sup-
er6 will give their allegiance to an enormous
log, Princeton will hearken to a tiger without
th, and California will be exhorted by a danc-
bear. An unique badger will be 'discovered
otising Wisconsin rooters and an equally
ue gopher will evoke the loyal cheers of Min-

nesota. Rather than be left out entirely Michigan
will be forced to "play" that a wolverine is a wdlf,
and those colleges who are unfortunate enough to
be known by a name other than that of one of the
membei-s of the animal kingdom will have to make
dive for the unclaimed beasts in the ark.
TAP-ROOM SPIRIT
The Union tap-room was designed by the arch-
itects of the building with the idea of giving it as
nearly the old Joe's-and-the-Orient homey, smoky,
congenial atmosphere of friendships and pleasures
as possible, and they have succeeded well. The
very design of the room tends to give it very much
the same sort of tone that we would expect to find
s'ould we visit any of the old English inns or ale
houses, and, though the ale is lacking, there is still
about the tap-reom a certain informal spirit of
congenialty that should appeal especially to the co.
leg man.
Last year tap-r.odi sings were very much in
vogue among the various clases of the Univer-
sity, and these informal gatherings tended to pro-
mote more intimate acquaintances and make for
more friendly spirit among the men of each of the
classes than would probably have developed with-
out such a stimulus. But what is even more im-
portant in the life of a college or university, these
sings tended to spread the old Michigan spirit
among the students through th medium of Mich
igan songs. Some of our lest collegiate songs have
gone more or less into the discard of late in favor
of the newer popular pieces, but down in the tap-
room we find coming back to us the old Michigan
airs which bring to the old timer memories of the
days that were and to the newcomer hopes and en-
thusiasm concerning the days that are to be.
College life has, no doubt, assumed entirely next
proportions in the past few years, but it is through
such mediums as the Union tap-room that the mem-
ories of college days can be best prolonged in the
minds of graduates.
THE "BUSINESS AD"
Business administration courses whch have
been introduced into the curricula of the most prom-
inent tunive.rsities and colleges in answer ,to the
call of the commercial world have met with so
much favor among students throughout the United
States that they are rapidly c ming to be on the
same footing as engineering or courses in the oldr
professions.
With the complex development of modern bsi-
ness resulting from modern inventions and the
world's changing attitude, toward industrial pro-
lems, it has become advantageous for.the executive
to have a broader knowledge than comes fror
merely learning the routine details of the particu-
lar bushiess problems of employment, the psychol-
ogy of the buying public, scientific marketing and
purchasing, foreign exchange and the like cal-
lenge his attention. To do the big things he must
be able to cope with them.
It is true that for the student to devote four
years of his time to learning how to act in a later
period when he will have won a place on the road
to success-for a man unable to perform the rou-
tine of-a business is not likely to become a success-
ful executive-is, in a *ay, putting the cart before
the horse. However, if the "business ad" has the
ability and ambition to succeed he will master the
routine work rafter leaving college, and when op-
portunity offers itself he will be able to go on
where the untrained man must stop.
T'he 'elescope
With clenched fiets the monster struck
His poor old daddy on the beak.
Shall I go on, or simply add
The brute was one year old that week.
And in the Meantime
LOST-The first week in October on Monroe,
E. University, Willard or.Church streets,-blue silk
dress.-Daily classified ad.

Boy, Page the Athlebic Association
Professor-And therefore since people's mind
react differently to different things it is impossible
to confuse or deceive everybody in a large -audi-
ence.
Stude-Oh, I don't know. The fellow that was
marking up the yardage and gains at the M. A. C.
game seemed to have everybody- guessing,
The other day we were reading in the paper
where some distinguished foreign diplomat while
at a dinner given in his honor by a Washington of-
ficial shocked everybody ly taking his meat dfp in
his hands and eating it. And the host in order that
his guest might not realize his breach of etiquette
did the same.
Well, practically the same thing happened to us
the other day. We took our girl to the Union for
dinner and everything vent fine until the pie was
brought on, which our girl forthwith attacked with
a fork.
Rather than embarrass her by chiding her in
public for her poor table manners, We did v at
any gentleman with a sense of delicacy would have
done-we also ate our pie with a fork.
Famous Closing Lines
"Ha, a dry doc," he muttered as he gazed at the
thirsty physician.
NOAH COUNT.

GRAHAM
(Two Sgtores)

Both

Ends of the Diagonal Walk

C a4AM

DETROIT UNITID LINES
Is Effect June 15, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Namtern Standard Time)
Limited and Expres#; cars leave for
Detroit at 6:10 a. m. and hourly to
9:19 p. iM.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Vx.
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Localsto Detroit-5: 55a.m., 7:00 a.i.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. in.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 ax. 'and 1:10 a.mn.
Locals to Jackson-7 :50 a. m.,and
12:10 p.m.

ORDER AN AUTO

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to take you to the theatre,
dance or any other social
function. Then you will ride
in comfort without danger to
milady's gown and with no
delay. We *1ll send you a
well-appointed cAr with a
skilful, careful driver who
knows the town from A to Z
and how to get to any place
by the quickest and easest
way. Keep our phone call in
your engagement book.
CIT' TAXI - PHONE t0

OCTOBER
S M T W T

3 4 5 6 7
10 11 12 18 14
17 18 19 .20 21
24 25 26 2 28
20
Meta ; Last season's

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8
15
22
29

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2
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30

I

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For

hats turn-

ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and savos you #ve to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Fator Hat Sta, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

I

STUDY LAMPS

and all kinds of

11

..EEC TRIC SUPPLIES

TY PE-
WRITERS
FOR RENT
OR SALE !-
.IUNDURW0IBS
L. G. SMIT'S
REMINGTONS
OLTPEA,

go to

WASHTENAW ELECTRIC SHOP

PHONE, 273

,200 WASHINGTON ST.

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999 TAXI 999
- - A Dodge Car
and D oAdge
Service-
Iwo enough said -
99TAXI 999
HALSEY'S
DANCING STUDIOS
Private Lessons Exclusively
(1 guarantee all modern dances in one course)
1-22 WUERTH ARCADE 1. --7-I0 P. K

Inlte wor-ld
211 HFTU AVE., NEW YORK
Dept. D 11.

i
_ . ......__-___ _-.___ . _,,___.__ .,w_,.,...w

We are zealous in maintaining
the QUALITY of

I CE

Our Factory at Ann Arbor is One of
the Finest in the State
and it is equipped with every modern appliance
to insure unifority of product

ASK FOR IT AT YOUR FA V ORI T E FOUNTAIN

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