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October 21, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-21

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SHOWERS

I

F Af.
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A$SOCIATI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERTICE

TODAY

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i

VOL. XXXI. No. 15. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1920. PRICE FIVE CE

U.AC H IE VEMENTS
IN HAITI LOST, IF
ARMY WITH DRAWS

LONG OCCUPATION

NECESSARY,

BELIEVES AMERICAN REP.
RESENTATIVE'

GENERATION REQUIRED
FOR SELF GOVERNMENT
General Knapp Claims Reports Alleg-
ing Cruelties to Women and
Children Untrue
(By Associated Press)f
Washington, Oct. 20.-"Achievements
of American intervention in Haiti will
have been lost unless military occupa-
tion of the country is continued a
great many years," Rear Admiral Har-
ry S. Knapp, recently sent to Haiti by
the state department, declared in a
statement made public tonight.
Admiral Believes We Must Remain
Replying to a question, as to when
the United States could withdraw
from Haiti, Admiral Knapp's state-
ment said: "I cannot answer this for
the administration, but in my personal
view of the work of American inter-
vention will have been practically
lost, if the United States withdraws
its forces for many years to come."
"I believe it will take at least a
generation, to develop in Haiti suffci-
ent men of a high enough standard of
ethics, to provide personnel of an hon-
est administration, and a background
of honest population, for its supp'ort,"
said Admiral Knapp.
No Crnel Practices Used
Replying to qpestions regarding
treatment of natives by the Americans,
Admiral Knapp denied that women
and children had been killed, or that
cruel practices had been used to ex-
fract information from natives.'. "A
full answer could not be given to the
the latter question, however, until cer-
tain allegations had been investigat-
ed," he added.
"The political administration of
Haiti is being conducted in strict ac-
cordance with the constitution adopted
in 1918," Admiral Knapp declaredi.
UTES SET FOR MORE
CANDIDATES ALREADY NAMED
BY MANY OF THE
CLASSES
The following classes will meet as
specified to make nominations for1
their respective class elections: junior
laws, 2 o'clock Thursday; senior
laws, 3 o'clock -Thursday; -and fresh-
men laws, 2 o'clock Friday, all in
room G, Law building. Senior engi-
neers, 5 o'clock Thursday, room 348,
Engineering building. Dental seniors,
10 o'clock Thursday; Dental juniors,
11 o'clock Thursday; and Dental
freshmen, 5 o'clock Thursday.
Nominations Made
Nominees for the various class of-
fices, as made yesterday and repiorted
to the Student council, are as fol-
lows
Sophomore lits--president, George
Planck, Vernon Hillery; vice-presi-
dent, Helen Schermerhorn, Helen
Torry; secretary, Mary Wagner,
Elaine McElroy; treasurer, Robert
Gibson, Carl Smith; football mana-
ger, Robert Adams, Lyle Bradley
Sophomore Engineers
Sophomore engineers - president,
Edward Johns, Rex Reson; . vice-
president, R. Iland, C. E. Proctor; sec-
retary, Edward Haugh, Robert Stod-
dard; treasurer, Bernard Butler,
Thomas Lynch, Henry Morton; foot-1
ball manager, Raymond Olds, Joseph
Block. '
Freshmen engineers - president,
John Bernard, Raymond Kritz; vice-
president, John Sutter, Frank Pollen.

This class will meet at 5 o'clock Fri-
day in room 348, Engineering build-
ing, to complete their nominations.
Surgeons Honor Professor Myers
Prof. Dean W. Myers, of the Univer-
sity Homoeopathic hospital, was elect-
ed to the board of governors of the
American College of Surgeons at a
meeting of the organization held last
week at Montreal, Canada-

W. A. A. LAUNCHES
MEMBL4RSHIP DRIVE
With the launching of the meiber-
ship eampaign for the Women's Ath-
letic association, Thursday morning,
Oct. 21, women of the University will
be given an opportunity to show their
interest in one of the largest fields of
women's activities.
The association numbers among its
annual affairs two picnibs, a banquet
and a cotillion. Through an honor
point system, awards of arm bands,
pins, and sweaters are given those
who make class teams and take an ac-
tive interest in tennis, archery, hiking
and indoor gymnasium work. Awards
are made only to members of the asso-
ciation.
Membership tables will be placed in
University hall, Tappan hall, the Li-
brary, and Barbour gymnasium.
BANDB6OUNCE SET
FR HNOVEMBER-15
Proceeds Will Cover Columbus and
St. Paul Trips; $5,000
Needed
CONCERT NUMBERS AND
VAUDEVILLE STUNTS PLANNED
With the intention of securing
funds for sending Michigan's 68
piece band to the Ohio State and Min-
nesota games, plans have been made
for a Band Bounce to be held Friday,
Nov. 5, in Hill auditorium. Oficiah
figure that the fg mer trip will cost
about $1,000, aid while no definite
figures have been secured as to the
expense of the latter trip, it is esti-
mated around $4,000.
Speaking of the program for the
Bounce H. P. Lindsay, '21, stated that
in addition to the usual concert num-
bers there would be five vaudeville
acts drawn from the best of campus
talent. "The program will be one of
the biggest' nights of real Michigan
entertainment ever offered," Lindsay
asserted.
Only once before has the Varsity
band attempted such a long trip as
the one to Minnesota. In 1914, when
Michigan played Harvard, the idea of
a Band Bounce to raise money to send
the team to Cambridge was conceiv-
ed, and the affair was successful.
Since that time it has become an an-
nual event.'
FOREIGN WAR VETS
TO ASK STATE AID
At the meeting of the Veterans of
Foreign Wars held at the Union last
evening plans were made for obtain-
ing action from the Michigan legisla-
ture in behalf of Michigan ex-service
men. A committee under the leader-
ship of Byron Field, '21, was appoint-
ed to get in touch with the candidates
for legislative positions and to secure
their sup ort for measures for the
pecuniary aid of the thousands of men
in Michigan who served during the
war. It was pointed out at the meet-
ing that sixteen states have already
passed laws of such a nature and it
is hoped that Michigan will take her
place with them.
A marger with the Overseas club
was the subject of some discussion, it
being pointed out that the two organ-
izations are covering practically the
same field in the University. The
sentiment of the members present fav-

ored a merger of the two clubs, but
official action upon the matter was de-
layed until the Overseas club could
have opportunity to consider it.
NO NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN
GREAT BRITAIN COAL STRIKE
(By Associated Press)
London, Oct. 20.-Today brought no
new development in the coal strike,
neither side to the dispute made any
offer to the other and no outside med-
iation was instituted.
It was still hoped tonight that the
proposal of William Drake, president
of the South Wales miners, may event-
ually lead to renewed negotiations;
but it is admitted it must first be
adopted by the miners' executive com-
mittee, which as so far been unable
to act.
Advocacy by some extremists of
withdrawing the pumping staffs from
the mines drew few supporters among
the miners generally, a number of
leaders being strongly against it.

GLEE CLUB MAY
STAGE OLD TIME
MINSTREL SHOW
UNION ASKS PERMISSION OF COM-
MITTEE ON STUDENT AF-
FAIRS
PLAN TO TOUR STATE
AT CHRISTMAS TIME
William Wheeler, of School of Music,
Secured to Train Large
Chorus
Request for permission to stage a
Glee and Mandolin club minstrel show
was made yesterday to the Committee
on Student Affairs by the Michigan
Union. Present plans are for the pro-
duction of a minstrel show of the qual-
ity of those that were popular on the
campus some five years ago, and a
tour of the state during the Christ-
mas vacation.
Officials Hopeful
While the Committee on Student Af-
fairs has not as yet signified its ap-
proval of the project, Union officials
do not expect to encounter a refusal.
The musical organization is under the
auspices of the Union this year and
this plan is the initial step in the
Union's effort to make the season a
successful one.4
It is the Union's idea to make the
Glee and Mandolin activities compare
favorably with the op@ra in popularity
and merits. In line with that aim, the
services of William Wheeler, of the
School of Music, have been secured to
train the chorus. Mr. Wheeler is re-~
puted to be one of the country's ex-
perts in handling large choruses, ac-
cording to officials of the Union.
Frederick R. Storrer, '21E, has been
named general chairman of the club
and he will act as student executive
in producing the minstrel.
A chorus of 50 voices will be taken
on the trip, which will last a week and
include all the large cities of the
state, according to present plans. Try-
outs for the Glee club have been asked
to report at 7 o'clock tonight at the
second floor reading room of the Un-
ion.
By an almost unanimous vote at its
meeting held last night the University
of Michigan Glee and Mandolin club
approved the resolution to affiliate it-
self with the Union and put all of its
business affairs in the hands of the
latter organization.
Club Remains Unit
The project, which was explained at
the meeting by R. A. Campbell, treas-
urer of the University and faculty ad-
viser of the club, provides that while
the business management of the club
is to be in the hands of the Union, the
organization is to remain as a unit,
elect its own officers other than busi-
ness manager, and retain its social or-
ganization.
Officers Elected
An expression of opinion was voiced
at the meeting in regard to the type
of music that should appear on the
programs, nearly all voicing their
sentiment that more strictly Michigan
songs should be given the* preference.
Officers of the club were elected as
follows: President, E. T. Jones, '21M;

vice-president, N. W. Bourne, '22M.
AMBULANCE CORPS
MEN DINE TONIGHT
Ex-service men who served in any
branch of the ambulance corps at
home or abroad during the war will
hold a get together dinner in the
Union at 6 o'clock tonight.
There are between 50 and 60 men
on the campus who have been in the
ambulance service and it is hoped
that all these will attend. If possible
an organization will be formed and
dinners will be held throughout the
year.
Frank L. Walters, '21L, is in charge
of the arrangements for the first
meeting. All those who desire to at-
tend are requested to notify him by
phoning 1855. American field service
men, United States 'army ambuiance
men and Red Cross ambulance work-
ers are invited.

(By L. A K.)
Although the present Chimes sub-
scription drive has already netted be-
tween 200 and 250 new subscriptions,
it has been decided to hold the cam-
pus stands open until noon today.
Most of the signers to date have been
men, and the staff of the publication
expect the women to take advantage
of this opportunity to back the Uri-
versity magazine.
Due'to the inability of the publish-
ers to have more than 125 copies
ready by yesterday, it was not possi-
ble for delivery to be made to all sub-
scribers, but enough of the magazines
are now on hand to insure immediate
elivery to all who have been forced
o wait.
The cover on this year's first issue
SEVEN KILLED IN
RAILROAD WRECK
Two New York Central Trains Side-
Swipe, as Result of Open
Switch
OCCUPANTS HURLED FROM
SEATS AS PULLMAN OVERTURNS
(By Associated Press)
Erie, Oct. 20.-Seven persons were
killed and 20 injured, three probably
fatally, when the New York Central
train No. 60 eastbound side swiped
train No. 23 westbound, within 200
feet of the Union depot here at noon.
A switch thought to have been thrown
by members of a section gang, work-
ing at the scene of the wreck, was be-
lieved to have caused the accident.
Car Leaps Rail
The westbound train had just left
the station and the eastbound was
coasting into .the station when the
crash came. A car of the eastbound
train suddenly leaped from the rails
and crashed into a pullman, tearing
its steel sides away as if it were pa-
per. The occupants of the car were
hurled from their seats, as the heavy
pullman toppled over with the open
side up.
Use Ladders in Extracting Dead
Policemen and firemen were forced
to use ladders in taking dead and in-
jured from the wreckage. All of the
dead were badly mangled, and it was
impossible to identify three of them
until the Pullman list could be check-*
ed up.
New York Central officials will be-
gin an investigation tomorrow.
'89 Alumnus In
Medical School
Dr. Harry L. Canright, '89M, who
has been doing missionary work in
China for the past 29 years, is taking
a graduate course in the 'Medical
school.
Dr. Canright was connected with
the hospital at Chengtu, China, during
the first 24 years of his stay in the
Orient, while for the last five years
he has been dean of the medical de-
partment of the West China Union
university.,
Cyril M. Canright, '24M, is a son of
the doctor.
CLASSICAL CLUB MAKES
PLANS FOR YEAR'S WORK
For the purpose of making further
plans for the year's work, the Classi-
cal club met Monday night in Alumni
Memorial hall.
The reports of the various commit-
tees appointed at the first meeting

were heard and discussed. It was
decided to hold a dance on the even-
ing of Nov. 12 in Barbour gymnasium'
instead of Oct. 26, as formerly an-
nounced.
Plans for a membership campaign
were discussed at length, and ar-
rangements made to get the drive un-
der way at once.'

of Chimes is worthy of note, being a
photograph of President Marion L.
Burton taken on the steps of the pres-
ident's home. The picture, which is
in colors on the magazine cover, is
one of 11 copies which have been
sent out to different papers, and
which has appeared in the rotogravure
sections of both the Detroit News and
the St. Louis Post Dispatch. It has
also been used as a cover by the
Flint Saturday Night and has appear-
ed in the Grand Rapids Herald and
the Adrian Telegram.
To Enlarge Magazine
Copies of this picture, for use in
memory books or for framing, may be
purchased at the Chimes office, on the
second floor of the Press building, any
atternoon from 2 to 5 o'clock.
The first issue this year contains
48 pages not including the , covers,
which is larger by eight pages than
any issue of last year previous to the
April number. Next month it is ex-I
pected to increase this number, when
the magazine will probably contain
from 56 to 64 pages.
November Issue Planned
The November issue will contain a
number of interesting articles, fore-a
most among which is one by prof.
Robert M. Wenley of the philosophy'
department, entitled "The Lit." This.
article is one of a series of four to
be written by members of the facul-
ties of the Literary and Engineering
colleges and the Law and Medical
schools concerning their respective
students. Moreover, the November is-
sue will contain an article on the sub-
ject of an editorial career, written by
Stuart Perry, '96L, editor of the
Adrian Telegram, which should be of
interest to all students but more es-
pecially to those who are contemplat-
ing journalism as a profession.
Reeive Aviation Article
A manuscript has recently been re-
ceived by Chimes from Laurence La
Tourette Driggs, '00, which will be
run in an early number of the maga-
zine. The paper, which contains some
7,000 words, is on the subject of avia-
tion from the pen of an authority on
the subject, as, among other things,
Mr. Driggs is president of the Amer-
ican Flying club, and has written nu-
merous papers and books on aeronau-
tics.
PLANS PROGRESS
FOR 19 21 OPERA
Plans for the 1921 Michigan Union
opera are progressing satisfactorily,
according to E. A. Krueger, '21E, gen
eral chairman of the opera.
A meeting of the book committee was
held a few days ago and several books
were considered. The final choice is
to be made within a few days. As
soon as the book is determined upon,
work on the music will start.
An effort is being made to get a
professional dancer here so that try-
outs for the chorus may secure in-
struction in this line. The success of
last year's opera was in a large meas-
ure due to the quality of the dancing
and special efforts will be made along
that line for the 1921 production.
FORESTERS HAVE SMOKER;
ELECT CLUB OFFICERS
The Forestry club opened its initial
meeting of the year last night with
a smoker on the fourth floor of the
Natural Science building.- An elec-
tion was held. F. X. Schumacher,
'21, was elected president, M. W.
Sample, '22, vice-president, J. S.
Barnes, '21, secretary, and L. M. Tur-
ner, '23, treasurer.
Prof. 'ilibert Roth, head of the for-
estry department, gave a short -ad-

dress, in which he explained the op-
portunities that are being opened up
to foresters and in which he encour-
aged the men of the forestry depart-
ment to do some intensive work the
coming year.
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB HOLDS
FIRST MEETING TONIGHT

TO

TAKE
7:30

Chimes Subscription Campaign
Lags; Women Fail To Sign

ILLINOIS SAME
MASS MEETING
PLANS COMPLET

A. o. CUTHBERT, '21E,
MADE CHEER LEADER
J. Fred Lawton, '11, Will Represent
Alumni on Pro-
gram
The final touch of enthusiasm for
the Illinois game will be administered
to the student body at the mass meet-
ing at 7:30 o'clock Friday night in
Hill auditorium, according to the
plans submitted last night to the
Student council by Clarence N. John-
ston, '21E, chairman of the commit-
tee.
Cheer Leader Named
A. O. Cuthbert, '21E, will, have
charge of the cheering at the meet-
ing, having been appointed official
cheer leader by the council.
J. Fred Lawton, '11, of Detroit will
be the alumni speaker Friday night.
Among many of the things for which
he is noted on the campus is the fact
that he was one of the composers of
"Varsity." Prof. John R. Brumm, of
the rhetoric department, will be the
other speaker. Donald K. Mirrielees,
'20, is to be chairman of the meet-
ing.
Pictures Will Be Shown
Pictures of the team will be thrown
on the screen and Michigan music
will be furnished by the Varsity band.
The doors of the auditorium 'will be
opened at 7 o'clock and the meeting
will be started promptly at 7:30
o'clock. ' It is planned that the last
song will be sung by 8 o'clock.
Jt was decided by the council that
the Fall games shall be held the
morning of Nov. 13, the day of the
Chicago game. C. G. Wetzel, '21E,
was named as chairman.
RULE Of DEMOCRTS
ATTACEDB Y KAHN
Hon. Julius Kahn, of California,
opened the Republican campaign in
this county last night in the Whitney
theater with a speech dealing with
national issues.
After a brief introduction by V. E.
Van Ameringen, local chairman of the
Republican committee, in which he
stated that Mr. Kahn had been in-
dorsed by the Democrats in 1918 and
was being supported by both tickets
this fall, the congressman scored the
administration for assuming it had
won- the war.
Against League
"Out of the 21 members of the Mil-
itary committee only three of the
Democratic members were for ' the
Conscription bill. It was for the Re-
publicans to carry it to victory," said
Mr. Kahn. "I believe that we should
be Americans first and then talk poli-
tics. The Democrats tried to make
it a Democratic war.
"I do not believe that the League
of Nations will prevent war and with
article 10 in it I believe it will bring
war," said Kahn in referring to this
issue.
Confident of Winning
Mr. jKahn attacked the administra-
tion's present policy of increasing
the army to its fullest extent of 507,-
000 enlisted men and officers, for it
would mean a deficit of millions of
dollars to equip it.
In conclusion Mr. Kahn stated that
he knew that Harding would be elect-
ed this fall and that President Hard-
ing would give the United States the
best cabinet it had had in a long
time. He would not make it a one
man government.

DIXIE CLUB PLANS DANCE
AND RECEPTION FOR TULANE
- Plans for a dance and reception
in honor of the Tulane university foot-
ball team will be completed at the
meeting of the Dixie club at 7:30
o'clock tonight at the Union. All men
from the south who are planning to at-
tend the reception are urged to at-
tend this meeting so that final ar-
rangements can be made.

PLACE FRIDAY
IN HILL AUDI-
TORIUM

FOUR AMERICAN ARMY PLANES The Cosmopolitan club will hold its
COMPLETE 9,000 MILE TRIP first meeting of the year at 7:30 o'clock
- tonight at Lane hall. The meeting will
(By Associated Press) be an informal get-together and those
Minneola, N. Y., Oct. 20.-Escorted who have not received invitations, be-
from New York to Minneola by an cause of faulty records of the secre-
aerial fleet, four American army aero- tary, are urged to attend. The pro-
planes today completed a 9,000 mile gram for this year's activities and
'round trip to Alaska which they matters of interest to foreign students
started July 15. will be discussed.

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