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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 05, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN AILY

Jtrr 3iii . I tt .
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
blished every morning except Monday during the Univer-
-ar by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
heAssociated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
cation of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
d' in this paper .and the local news published therein.
itered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan as second

iption by carrier ijr mail, $3.50,
Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Strert.
9:Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.

Communications not to exceed 3oo words, ii- signed, the sig-.
lure not necessarily to appear in pint, but as an evidence of
th. -nd notices of events will be published in' The Daily at the'
soretion" of the Editor, if -left at or mailed. tb The Daily office.
asigned communications will receive no consideration. No man
cript -will be returned unless the writer- incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the. sentiments
esed in ,the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be reccwved after E o'clock
the evening preceding insertion.
EDTORIAL STAFF
Tslephone 2414,.
ANAGING' EDITOR -....... OEORCE O. BROPHY JU,-
ews Edit"(Cheser V tAtthp
airman EditorialBord... . . ..--...Lee Woodruff
ght Editors- H. W. H~thcock
T. H. Adam .W .thol
J.I. Dakin J. E. McManis
Renaud Sherwood Er W. Sargent. Jr
nda Editor ......... ....... -A ernstei
ty Editor.... .... P. Campbell
torials+.......BT. J. Whinery, ."A. Kern, S. T. Beach
pot :. .;....................... Robert Angell
omen's Editor........... . ..-...........Mary D Lane
legraph....... ....... ..............Thomas Duwey
lesope ............... .......--....Jack W. Kelly
Assistant
ephine Wald* Frank H' McPike Sidney B. Coates
Sul G. Weber J A. Bacon C. T. Pennoyer'
iabeth Vickery W. W. Ottaway Marion B. Stahl
orge Reindel Paul Watzel Lowell S. Kerr
rry B. Grundy Byron Darnton Marion Koch
aces Oberholtzer M. A Klaveu Dorothy Whipple
,bert E. Adams E. R. Meiss Gerald:,P. Ov~erton.
iace F. Elliott Walter Donnelly Edw'ard Lambrecht
ghston McBain Beata. HastgeySass EWaller
Kathrine Montgomery H. It. Howlett

BUSINESS STAFF-.
Telephone 960

SINESS MANAGER..........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
ertising.. . ......:.;::.........: . oe
sifieda....... ............ ............S. Kunstadter
li--ation.......................:1.' M..Heath
ounts n.................E.... --------..- - . R. Priehs
'elation ................ - -......... ...V. F. Hillery
Assistants
W. Larmbrecht M.. M. Moule H. C. Hunt
J. Harnel, Jr. N. W. Robertson M. S. Goldrin
*H. Hutchinson 'Thos. L. Rice H. W. Heidbreder
A. Cross 'R . Burcu.hell W. Cooley
obt. L. Davis A. J. Parker

R.
J.
P.
F.
Rc

and dexterity. The successful wielder of the foil
nust be possessed of a trained eye, a quickness of
movement, and a speed and poise without which he
could easily be beaten by even an inexperienced but
calm opponent. All these gaulities fencing helps .to
build up, and as a developer of certain muscles of
the body it is unexcelled.
Its advocates on the campus number not a- few
this year, but they have never come together for
organization. If they would do so, considerable
benefit might be derived. Director May, of Water-
man gymnasium, is a fencing enthusiast of long
standing, and has signified his willingness to help
out -such. a movemnt and to give lessons in the
'sport, should the students feel sufficien'tly interested
to ask it of him.
The opportunity. for reinstatement of fencing as a
sport of some standing at Michigan is now before.
us. Why not put it again on the list?
A "RAISE" FOR MICHIGAN JOURNALISM
The recent action of the Regents in rechristening
the department of rhetoric so that it will be hence-
forth known as the department of rhetoric and
journalism, marks another step toward making
Michigan one of the foremost schools of journal-
ism in the 'country. This official recognition will
accomplish much in the way of advertising and in
establishing the journalistic school on a firmer and
more definite basis.
Prof. F. N. Scott, the head of the department,
states that it will be conducted along the same lines
as have. heretofore been followed. The scope of
the work will be extended whenever it is possible
and the department enlarged from time to time. It
has always been the aim to teach the higher foriis
of newspaper work, laying particular stress on the
ideal and ethical side of newspaper writing and
training. In broadening this work, no courses sim-
ilar to a trade school will be offered, for it is
rightly felt that this is' entirely outside the ultimate
design of a school of this type. That the liberal
training now given is in the right direction, is amply
attested by the great success that has accompanied
the work of many Michigan graduates now con-
nected with newspapers throughout the country.
AS TO ARCHAEOLOGISTS
Nine-tenths of the ruins of all the cities of the
ancient world have been until recently in Turkish
territory. Before the war the Turkish government
placed every possible obstacle in the way of archaeo-
logical research, but now that the land is under
British dominion the impediments have been -re-
moved and a school of archaeology has been pro-
jected for Bagdad. Every possible encouragement
is given to research work in this art.
Archaeology has not as yet been taken seriously
by the American public. One who delves among
the ruins of the past seems to most people to be an
.old fossil, useful as the object of jocular remarks
made by vaudeville performers. As a matter of
fact, the archaeologist of today is a scientist trained
for years by the study of history, language, and art.
He is a practical man, for he must lead expeditions
to foreign lands and deal with a great range of ob-
stacles, from disease to savage tribes. Thomas Law-
rence, who won Arabia to support of the allies and
set up a kingdom, was an archaeologist. He, with
others of his kind, was vitally interested before the
war in rediscovering the art and the habits of buried
civilization, in order to make their achievements live
again and be valuable to us.
Archaeology is a field which today offers great
opportunities to men who have the training and the
desire to be of some service to the world.
Lawns or cement - which shall it be? Keep off
the grass!
'the Teleope
Another Verston of It
The lover and the light are foes,
Without an earthly doubt.
For every time that one comes in

The other one goes out. .

Slep Anyplace ut
Lat at Rex'sI
THE CLUB LUNCH
712 ARBOR STREET
Near State and Packard
Want anything? If you want what
you want,,when you want it, use a
Want Ad in the Michigan Daily.-Adv.

Do You Need Extra Courses?
Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English,.
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages, Economics,
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire
how credits earhed may be applied on present college program.
HOME STUDY DEPT. CHICAGO. fLAINOIS law

I

THEY CALL IT THE

WONDER HIT OF THE AGE!

SR BOTH ENDS

TOlOGT

OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

ANNUAL BOOK SALE

I

..AT-'j

WE' L L ALL KNOW WHY!
For at 8:15 P. M. sharp at the Whitney Theater, David Wark Griffith will
open an engagement of three days with what has been called by artists, mu-
sicians, poets, preachers and editors, Griffith's greatest masterpiece. It is called

Open Evening During Sale

Persons wishing to secure information, concerning news for any
Iusue of The Daily should sme the night editor,.1.who. has full charge
et all news to be printed thai night.
THURSIOAY MAY 5, 121.
Night Editor-JOHN E. MMANIS
STUDENTRELIGION
It is better to argue half a day on abstract theory
t/an to take one chance at guessing rightly what
some people think of religion, and we might be
just as successful in judging the, character of all
brown-eyed people as we would be in stating a sat-
isfactory .opinion regarding student religion. Yet
there is a "student religion", however different it
may be from that of the outside world, that is prac-
ticed by a good majority of Christian-professing
students here at Michigan.- Students do. not always
follow the right as'-it is branded by the rest -of -the
world, they think and act for themselves and- us -
ually are sincere in 'their purpose. Many of them
do not go to church or display their religion in any
way different from"ordinary life, yet they have rea-
sons for so doing.
Is it because students have no feeling for relig-
ion that they do not attend church, or it is because
they fail to get that feeling satisfied in present day
services? We. areinclined to believe it is the latter.
The time is past when a student -goes to church
for the sake of getting social insurance. -It does
him no good, and besides he hasn't the time to- put
in that wa. He goes now, if he goes at- all, to get
the spirit of religion, a certain higher feeling within
him, satisfied. And the more the Gospel is con-
nected:with preaching the more spirit will be im-
bued. When a man goes to church, instead of study-
ing, and hears a Sunday lecture on the sins of go-
ing to movies on. Sunda. or the damnation, result-
ing from playing Sunday baseball he feels a little
disappointed - even though he can- say he has
been to .church. It -is -true it gives him something
to talk about for:alittle while but the sane lasting
feeling which some religious thought about the Bi-
B ble might have'im'parted is lacking, - Radical ideas
stir' up- but are soon frgotten and the njajority of
students would rathef get down to the old fashioned
truths of the Bible thin'liiten to such' a'lecture.
.Student religion is at heart more vf tally concerned
with the spiret,,the. atn-osphere, the psychology of
worship than -with.the wage question or the Bolshe-
vik. It doesn't have, to- be a question. concerning
the script of the Testaments or the meaning of ,the
book of Revelations, but it must have something of
the really vital truth aid faith as taught by the
Savior applied to everyday life.
The spirit of religion can be for some like the
ethereal inspiring poetry of Shelly; or for others
it may mean the trees and the woods and the flow-
ers, but few are the students who concern their
worship with the understanding of the Einstein
theory, the latest ethical philosophy, or the labor
question. To many. students' taste- there is always
something a little out of place, almost artificial, in
sermons which; under a religious aspect and dress,
'leave us uninspired with the'true spirit -of religion.
FNCING
A' number of yea'rs ago, the fine art of fencing
was recognized in the University and its activities
included even a regularly organized fencing club
and fencing classes. O.late, however, interest has
apparenti)' died out; -and foils and masks are no
longer seen in the gymnasium.
Fencing is an excellent sport to develop muscle

D.

W. GRIFFITH'S

The People Have Said:

LET'S GO

Note:-The Management advises
delay and confusion at

Patrons to secure
the Box Office.

their seats in advance and avoid

>. #
T ....

Dear Noah:
What is America's most famous
Sorry,- but we don't believe that
this question. Wall street used t o1
know if it still is or not.

watering place?
X. Checker.
we can answer
be but we don't

The more one thinks about the matter the more
one is forced to accept the idea that the reason there
are so many failures in the world is because people
do not engage in the business or occupation to which
they are best adapted. Many professors for instance
should have been druggists. If you doubt this just
begin reading some of the textbooks which they have
written and which have from the first been such a
drug on the market.
This One Goes Back to 1884, to the Time of
Jim Duffy
A young alumnus of '95 was walking around the
Horticulture Garden when he was accosted by a,
Fresh lit.
"I have been informed," said the F. L., "that this
hill is the highest place in Michigan."
"No," replied the alumnus, "you're wrong -- the
Chinese Gardens is."
Famous Closing Lines
"Watch words," he muttered as he listened to the
"Tick, tick" of his Ingersoll.
NOAH COUNT.

The Perfect Hat for

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Multiple stitched cloth hats

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STATE STREET AT - LI-B B R-TY
or Young'tien Since 1848

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