100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 01, 1921 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Aroused By Editorial
ment On Criticism Of Rankin

-t---------- ..,. -

a few
ial e:

n edi- clusively to criticism; Frank Harris
upon who, as a London editor, was the first
ikin's to recognize and make use of the tal-'
f the ents of Shaw, Wilde, and Kipling, says,
H. L. "He will see for himself and state
rs of what he sees without fear or favor.
mauni- Only one or two journalists of this
calibre are given to any country in
words any single generation; he ranks with
titled, the Lemaitres and the Hardens, above
pear- the Garvins and the Bennetts if below
many the Shaws;" Vanity Fair has printed
most his picture with enthusiastic words of'
iter's praise in three of the past four issues,
f the while his name and opinions are con-,
ae sly stantly recurring in the columns of
f his The Bookman, The Dial, and the other
ident literary magazines-even the erudite
than old London Athenaeum-all of which
titles hold him in profound respect. For,
Prej- further substantiation I refer you to

te th
ey of
,e ev
iore
t ar
he "

t finding enlightenment in
study of the work, he
;ave it up as a bad job.
e has no hesitancy in dis-
own "narrowed viewpoint"
a man who is nationally
-not only by those "of that
onstructed Menckenesque
mind, but by critics and
mselves-as the greatest
iend of younger writers in

the jackets of Mencken's books, where
the blurbs repeat the encomiums of
half the civilized countries of the
world.
Now a man who is as universally
recognized as this-a man who wrote
the first book on Shaw to be published
in this country, who was managing
editor of a metropolitan newspaper at
the age of 25, who wrote at 28 a clear
and authoritative book on all of

he has ever read Mencken's article on
Dreiser. Despite the fact that Mencken
considers Dreiser to be America's
greatest novelist, he spends page after
page tearing him to pieces and show-
ing his weak points. A more convinc-
ing and impartial criticism would be
hard to find.
The writer continues with some ob-
tuse nonsense ,about a "man whose
egotistical personality simply serves
as a vehicle through which to foist his
critical judgments upon the public at
large, etc.," through the use of "rather
ill-chosen epithets." Now, unless I
miss the point altogether, this first
quotation has but little meaning.
Criticism is not "foisted" upon the
public. The public reads it because
it wants to; and a critic, not being
superhuman, is not endowed with any
power of giving any other than his own
judgments. As for this last, Mencken
has proved time and again his unfail-
ing ability to pick first-rate work.
Time invariably proves the truth of
his judgments. I take the example of
James Branch Cabell, of whom we are
hearing a great deal these days. If
you will turn back to the pages of The
Smart Set of about four years ago,
when Cabell's half dozen unknown vol-
umes were gathering dust on the book
store shelves, you will find a long and!
enthusiastic article about Cabell-a
prophesy which has since come true.
Admires Mencken's Style
As for the "ill-chosen epithets,"
nothing could be more absurd. I have
no quarrel with anyone who does not
like Mencken's diction-although I
think it ideal for his sort of work-I
cannot see how dny reader can fail to
realize the peculiar aptness of all
these epithets and figures. Mencken
invariably finds exactly the most pic-
tureque word to express his meaning.
This word may be coined or it may be
slang. It says what its user wants

and that Is all he desires.
Next the writer springs these amaz-
ingwors of wisdom: "Go to his
works.rAfter you have read oneof
them, you have taken the meat from
all." If he will read such various
books of Mencken's as "The Philos-
ophy of Friedrich iNetzsche," "The
American Language," "In Defence of
Women," "A Book of Burlesques,"
"Heliogabalus," and "The American
Credo," he will realize the enormity
of this statement.
The editorial ends up with the
ridiculous assertion that Mencken's
"estimate" of Rankin's book brands
him as a "small critic." Ye Gods!
Words fail
I should like to suggest to the edi-
torial writer that, before he so lightly
condemn one of America's few bril-
liant men of letters, he make a real
"exhaustive survey" of that man's
works, not letting the phaseology blind
him to the philosophy and critical in-
sight that lie beneath.
MENCKENITE.
STEAMER CAPTAIN CLAIMS HE
HOLDS RIVER SERVICE RECORD
Cincinnati, O.-Captain Edward S.
Williamson, who on April 12 celebrat-
ed his 76th birthday anniversary, be-
lieves he hold a river record that is
unequaled. For 62 years he rode on
boats on the Ohio river. For 55 years
he was a licensed pilot. Now he is
captain of the steamer John S. Hub-
bard, which operated between Cincin-
nati and Louisville.

I1

pictures explaining the stories and Try a Classified Ad for results.-Ads
TODAY'S CURHSEVCE

library authorities through a series of
sets of opera scores, pictures of com-
posers, famous musicians and photo-
graphs of grand opera stars in cos-
tume which are being loaned to vari-
ous music clubs and to the public
schools throughout,.the state.
Although not yet so extensively de-
veloped as the travelling libraries and
picture sets, the demand for books and

UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Sts.
SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minister

Sunday, May 1, 1921

4,

I

' xnhre, 's " 0rp
jflurd1
Cor. Catherine and Division Sts.
Rev. Henry Tatlock, D.D., Rector
Rev. Charles T. Webb, Curate

very large. it is noped to increat
scope of the work until regular tr
ling sets of books about opera
pictures of its best exponents, pos
accompanied V'y phonograph rec
can be supplied to the schools
self-improvement societies of M
gan, especially in rural district

2d

10:40 A. M.-"Am I a Normal
Human Being?" In a day, of
mental examinations and oth-
er tests, religion has one word
to say on this subject.
4:30 P. M.-Young People gath-
er at Church for outdoor
meeting, weatherapermitting.
In case of bad weather, meet-
ing at the church at 5:45, and
6:30, as usual.
A Cordial Welcome to All!

7:35 A. M.--Holy Communion.
10:30 A. M.- Holy Communion
and Sermon by the Rector.
4:30 P. M. --- Eveniing Service
and Address by Mr. Sumio
Uenigi, M.A., B.D., Japanese
Graduate Student of Univer-
sity of Chicago. Subject: "How
I became a ,Christian."

i
3

'y. . Nietzsche's works, and who has been
cotes Other Critics the first to prepare an exhaustive
o not shove my own word study of the American language-a
r throat as does tie edi- book even used for reference by the
er. Let me quote the opin- rhetoric department of this University
ew others: Waldo Frank in -this man is surely entitled to a little
sting'interpretation of Amer- more than the superficial considera-
Our America," he says; "He tion he receives in last Sunday's Daily.
his emerging generation. Mencken and Deiser
y the authority of Mencken As for the editorial: the writer
ritical flatlands of the Unit- starts out by saying that there are
s a thing delicious and beau- critics and critics, some of whom
behold;" James Huneker, "show their readers just what the good
nion few can ridicule, ac- and bad points of a book may be." He
icken's dictum and, against does not include Mencken in this class,
clinations, gave up writing thereby giving one proof of how little
es and devoted himself ex- he knows of this critic. I wonder,- it

STATE LIBRARY AUTHORITIES
FOSTER MUSIC APPRECIATION
Lansing, Mich.-Appreciation of the
best in music, as well as in literature

ANN ARBOR
BIBLE CHAIR

FIRST
BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St., Below State
J. M. WELLS, MINISTER
321 East Ann Street

and art, is

being fostered by the state

I

Headquarters in Lane Hail.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Church Edifice, 409 S. Divisionj

10;30 A. M.--Baptism and Com-
munion. Sermonette by Mr.'

Wells.

Classes meet in the "Upjer
Room."
Upper Room Bible Class Sat-
urday evenings. Univer.sity
Men's Bible Class Sunday
morning.
Ask for printed circular an-
nouncing six courses.
Read the Upper Room Bulletin
THOMAS M. IDEN,
Instructor.

.... .

TODAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY

Sunday services at 10:30 A. M.
The subject will be: "Everlast-
ing Punishment. Testimonial
meeting Wednesday evening at
7:30. A cordial invitation is ex-
tended to all. Sunday School at
11:45 A. M., to which pupils un-
der 20 years may be admitted.
A public reading room, 236 Nick-
els Arcade, is open daily, except
Sundays and holidays, from 12
to 5 o'clock.

6:30 P. M. -- Guild Meeting.

12:00 M. - Guild Class.

I

I-

T

4;

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

77-n

y'

10:30 A. M.-HOLY COMMUNION.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
DISCIPLES

12:00 Noon-"The World's Best Books." Prof. Henderson will sipeack
to the class on what he considers to be the best books
Ii of the world's literature. This will be the first ot a

South University Ave.

series of three talks on this subject.

6:00 P. M.--Social Half-Hour.

\1
^
--}
/
1"

.
,
4
l
ti Z,,
r r,
°- '1 i

9:30 A. M.-Bible School.
10:3 0 A. M.-Third Lecture on
the Reformers of the Church
Scott, Richardson, Erret,
McLean, Rains.
6:30 P. M.-Christian Endeavor.
7:30 P. M.--A Native Japanese
will speak. He is a student
from Chicago University, pre-
paring to go to his people as
a missionary.
F. P. ARTHUR, Pastor
Classes for Students

6:30 P. M.-C. E. Subject: "Cod's Out-of-Doors." Kenneth Robert-

S
e
a

son, Leader.

2!

......

.I 7:

I

Like,;a snarling tiger cub, grown strong, that turns upon its mighty sire,
so Red Pawl one day tested the iron fists of his father, the'hardest skipper
on all the seven seas. Soon he crawled away, beaten but uncowed, to plot
another means to seize the ship and get the girl he craved.
His treacherous plan went well, a knife flashed, the skipper was down
and then - You will never forget the startling, crashing climax of this picture.
UCTI

1111lI11lIU!!!l111111111!l111111,1L111''
r -
CHURCN .
SFifth Ave. and William St.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
REV. ARTHUR W. STALKER, D.D., Pastor
MISS ELLEN W. MOORE, Student Director
9:30 A. M.-"Jesus' Principles of Living," Bible Class. Leader, Mr.
Clair Searles.
10:30 A. M.-"THE HIGHEST EDUCATION," Dr. Stalker's Subject.
12:00 Noon--Four Student Bible Classes.
6:00 P. M.-Social Half-Hour for the Young People.
6:30 P. M.-"The Greater Mission," Leader, Mr. J. Kyuang Dunn.
Wesleyan Guild Devotional Meeting.
7:30 P. M.-MISS WELTHY HONSINGER will deliver the Wesleyan
Guild Lecture. Subject: "THE WORLD'S NEED AND
THE STUDENT'S ANSWER."
Special Music: "Benedictus" (Moir), the Chorus; "He shall come
down like Rain" (Buck); "With Verdure Clad" (From Creation)
(Haydn), Mrs. Wheeler; "I will mention the loving kindness of
the Lord" (Sullivan), the Chorus; ,"Evening Hymn" (Rheinber-
ger), the Quartette.
A SPECIAL INVITATION IS EXTENDED TO THE STUDENTS

-I

11

if

It

ADAPTED FROM 'THE PAM@ Ut arV@RV
"BLACK PAWI:"BY BEN A I WILLIAMf
UPE4VI/ED AND DIRECTED BY
SPECIAL COMEDY
"THE CURE" - CHARLIE CHAPLIN
KINOGRAMS - ARCADE ORCHESTRA
SHOWING-MATINEE 1:30, 3:00, 4:30; EVENING 7:00, 8:30
COMING WEDNESDAY
"THE PASSION FLOWER" - WITH NORMA TALMADGE

10:30 A. M.-Regular morning
service. The Rev. Ben H.
Pershing, pastor of Emanuel
Lutheran Church, Etna, Pa.,
will be the preacher.
11 30 A. M.-Sunday school.
1111111111111111111l11tl11111111IItli 1111
11lllllillilllltltillil111I tI tU111111i
ZION LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Fifth Ave. and Washington St.
REV. E. C. STELLHORN,
Pastor
We walk by faith, not by sight.
Faith unravels the puzzles and
tangles of life. Genuine faith
never apologizes. We preach
Christ the author and finisher
of our faith.
10:30 A. M.-(German) "Damna-
tion of the Orthodox."
7:30 P. M. - (English) "Jesus
"our Attorney."
. A welcome to all.

El

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

-T

Morning Worship, 10:30.

The minister will continue a discussion of
which was introduced on last Sunday morning.
ject is: "CHRISTIANITY'S MESSAGE TO ,MEN
TRY.'!

the theme
The sub-
IN INDUS-

During the remaining Sunday evenings of tne .niver-
sity year the Congregational students will be given a op-
portunity to meet the members of the faculty who are affil-
iated with this church.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan