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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 30, 1921 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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FICIAL NEWSPAPER 0 ATHE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
shed every morning except Monday during the Univer-
by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
ion of all news dispatches credited to it} or not otherwise
n this paper and the local news published therein.
ed at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
:er.
ription by carrier er mail, $3.50.
a: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.-
s: Business. 96o; Editorial, 2414. i
nulications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
t necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
. notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
communications will receive no consideration. No man-
ill be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
Daily does not necessarily endorse the "sentiments ex-
nthe communications.
at's Going On" notices will not be received after S o'clock
ening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
NO EDITOR..........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
ito.... .......Chesser M. Campnhp1
Editorial Board........ . .......Lee Woodruff
litors-
*, H. Adams Z. W. Hitchcock
I. Dakin .MManis
enaud Sherwood 'T. W. Sargent, Jr.
ditor ... J A. Bernstein
)r ......... .' .....B. P. Campbell
........ .T.J. Whinery, I, A. 'Kern, S. T. B each
.... ................... Robert Angell
ditor ......... ..................Mary D. Lane
...............Thomas Dewey
.... ... ..-...Jack W. Ke

Assistants
aid* Frank H. McPike
ber J. A. Bacon
ckery W. W. Ottaway
Ldel Paul Watzel
-undy Byron Darnton
holtzer M. A. Klaver
.dams E. R. Meiss
Vlictt Walter Donnelly
cBain Beata Hasley
Kathrine Montgomery

Sidney B. Coates
C. T. Pennoyer
Marion B. Stahl
Lowell S. Kerr
Marion Koch
Dorothy Whipple
Gerald P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht
Sara Waler
H. ] Howlett

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
INESS MANAGER.........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
ertising . . . - - -Kusta te
y .tion............ .... . .....- - F. M. Heat
uan ts............... ........E R. Priehi
on ... ..............................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
r W Lambrecht M. M. Mole H. C. Hunt
F. Hamel, Jr. N. W. Robertson M. S. Goldring
H. H tchinson Thos. L. Rice H. W. Heidbreder
A. Cross R. G. Burchell W. Cooley
obt. L. Davis A. J. Parker
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
e of The Daily should ee the night editor, who hasIfull charge
.11 news to be printed that night.
t SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 1921.
ight EditorJOHN I. DAKIN.
MICHIGAN SPIRIT NEXT YEAR
III - ORGANIZATION
the third of the series of editorials on Michigan
rit in the coming year concerns organizations,
1 primarily the honor organizations of the cam.
Two phases of these organizations present
mselves: first, their indirect influence upon the
dent body, and second, their direct influence, or
ir achievements. Of late some discussion has
sen as to the value of such elective societies, but
ir existence is vindicated by the indirect influ-
e which they exert, - the incentive toward the
omplishment of greater things at the University.
ere is possibly none who goes into campus activ-
s solely for the purpose of being elected to hon-
ry organizations. Some enter activities because
work affords them pleasure, many because they
ire experience in a certain line, and the great Ma-
ity because they feel that they should be 'doing
lething for Michigan. But there is perhaps not
out of a hundred who will not work harder,
will not strive more tenaciously, under the
,r of recognition for his services, not only by
activity of which he is a member, but by the
iversity as a whole.
ut honor societies should be more than an in-
tive to students before they have been elected.
present there is a tendency to allow honor to be
sole function, but unless accomplishment is at-
ted, membership will cease to be an honor. These
:ct circles comprise the proven leaders of the
pus, men who have tried, and have achieved.
s inevitable that through the close co-operation
such men with definite aims in mind, the honor
ieties could bestow tangible benefits and exert a
nct influence upon the University. A greater
nber of meetings, arranged at definite dates,
uld be held by these organizations, in order that
r members might discuss questions of impor-
:e, plan their aid to campaigns, and absorb the
ws of each individual upon campus matters.
n brief, the honor organizations of Michigan, as
bodies best fitted for that purpose, should take
active part in directing the policies and affairs
the student body, in order that by concentrated
>rt they may benefit the University, and main-
l the high grade of distinction which in the past
marked entrance into their ranks.
THAT LEGAL MIND
;x-President Wilson, when at work on the peace
otiations in Paris, summarily told Secretary
-sing that "he didn't want lawyers drafting the
ty of peace". Mr. Lansing thereupon kept
et, or at least only suggested; though he was
fing pretty hotly underneath his august legal
erior, and the whole boiled out at last in his
te Peace Negotiations", published as soon as the
nocrats left office.
'he point under discussion is not whether Mr,
son was justified in "squelching" Mr. Lansing,
whether the latter's hindsight opinions on the
duct of the Paris meet are correct. Probably it
take considerable history-writing to settle it.
the principal fact to be noted here is that the
Sident relegated Mr. Lansing's ideas to the

wastebasket not because he had a low idea of his
secretary's intelligence nor of the latter's knowledge
of affairs; but because he was possessed with a
commonly held idea anent lawyers in general: they
were hardshells, steeped in. tradition, refusing to
adopt any ideas not "on all fours" with judgments
6f the past.
So great an international document as the League
of Nations, he thought, ought to be drafted by pro-
gressives, and indeed could only be drafted by men.
who were willing to break with conservative no-
tions, go beyond the prejudices of the past, even
forget history if need be. This was to be a new
era; if the old could not be set aside there was no
use attempting the change, for it was to be based
upon the death Hof the discredited, war-breeding
past. For such things, Wilson called in the states-
men and politicians, the experts in ethnology, the
international theorists.
Is the American lawyer constitutionally unfitted
for such a work? Does his eternal system of back-
reference for decisions mentally incapacitate him
for the forward-looking, the progressive task of dis-
carding what is bad in the past for what is best
in the future?
Doubtless.tthe country's bar numbers manymen
whose mental limitations keep them always within
the ruttings of routine, passing on only what other
men have reasoned out for them. But the true
lawyer, the inan of Marshall's stamp, the man who
does the reasoning into new fields with the proved
past as -a sound basis, is the surest hand for any
constructive work of enlightened organization
within or between nations. The Roman empire, for
one example, was built upon the lawyer's progres-
sive work of knitting together and ordering the
lives of a great hodgepodge of nations, races, tradi-
tions, conflicting forces of every kind.. The man
who refuses to avail himself of experience is tray-
eilng blindly; the lawyer keeps all the past filed be-
fore him, but also learns supremely the art of rea-
soning out the new. He best of all should know
how to build soundly; and who wants any other
kind of building?
The writer will not forget the words of a profes-
sor who declared: "The true lawyer is the man who
reasons out his theory first, and does his own think-
ing; not the fellow who is always hunting for cases
'on all fours' with the situation." As long as law is
taught in that light there will always be a place -
and a great place -- for the man who is trained in
its ways.
The latest good word for a change in the eligibil-
ity rules: "Semi-professional baseball for the col-
lege athlete without losing his amateur team, as
shown by their statements made Wednesday in re-
gard to summerbaseball." - The DaiJy Iowan.
The swarm of kids who gain admittance to.Var-
sity ball games and holler the inevitable "nickel for
the seat !" to the standing multitude aricturesque
but pesky. How's for the official admitters to
watch the fences?
When the Gargoyle criticises, its' humor; when
any other publication criticizes, it's mud-slinging -
according to the Gargoyle, and they ought to know.
T1he T eleope
So Says Our Tailor
Getting blood out of a turnip
Is indeed a difficult feat;
But harder by far is the task
Of getting money out of a dead beat.
Dear Noah:.
Is it true that baseball originated in England in
the middle of the eighteenth century? Bill Yess.
We don't know exactly when the game did orig-
inate but it was evidently being played in te time
of Coleridge because in his Rhyme of the ghcient
Mariner in speaking of some shortstop he said,
"He stoppeth one of three."

Here It Is Again
THE SMALL TOWN IDOL
In seven parts
- From the introduction to the show now playing
at the Arcade.
Speaking of movies, though,
Reminds us that there are some
Honest producers in the country
Because just the other day
We dropped in and saw a show
That was awfully
Mushy
But even the producer must have
Known this because he himself called it
A serial.
We thank you.
In the $3.oo a Week Room Class
First stude-Whatcha goin' to do this summer?
Second ditto-I don't know, but I've got to make
about $i,ooo if I'm to come back for next year.
First stude-But why so much money?
Second--Well, I see the official announcement
has again declared that one can get through nicely
on $6oo a year.
Famous Closing Lines
- "Getting there with both feet," he muttered as he
saw the student riding the bicycle.
NOAH. COUNT.

BOTH- ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK
Open Evening During Sale

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
tEastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m. 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. in., and hourly to 9:10 p. mn.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. mn.
Locals to Detroit-S:55a.i., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. mn.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.mn.
Locals to Jackson-7 :o a. m.. and
12:10 p.m.
1921 APRIL 1921
S M -T WV T F S
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 1S 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St Pbnne 1742

i4 tl
i
0
M
nr
A

ENGRAVING
ORDER NOW
LEAVE YOUR ORDIER FOR
VISITING CARDS
Plate and 100 cards $3.00 and up
Reprinting 100 cards $2.06
10 per cent discount on all orders received before May 10
0. D. )OR RILEL, .7 Nickels Arcade

1 WINDOW SHADES

PICTURE FRA

ANNUAL BOOK SAl

Student Headquarters
We carry complete stocks of "Brighten-Up" finishes in small size
cans for all "touch-up' jobs around the house.
PAINTS VARNISHES BRUSHES WALL PAPER

CAT

ENAMELS

HALCIMINE S

STAINS

GLASS

L. EEWENZEL

P

Painting and Decorating

OPPORTUNITY GOOD
IN LIBRARY WORK
With more than 16,000 people en-
gaged in library work, this field now
offers very interesting, inviting, and
profitable work for,men and women ac-
cording to William W. Bishop, librar-
ian.
During the war big business houses
realized that men trained in library
methods were valuable in corporative
work. There are now 1,500 positions
vacant in the library field, according
to recent reports.
Throughout the country there are
more than 1,000 executive positions on
library staffs paying good salaries that
demand men of training such as could
be obtained by a post graduate course
at a library school, says Mr. Bishop.
Such schools, giving a two year course,
are now maintained in the New York
public library, the New York state
library, at Albany, the University of
Illinois, and the University of Cali-s
fornia. School maintaining a one year
course are located in the Western Re-
serve university, Wisconsin universi-
ty, Carnegie library of Pittsburgh, and
the St. Louis public library.
There are now 10,000 positions on
library staffs that pay as much as
teaching positions. Equal opportunity
is open for men and women, the pres-
ident and many officers of the Amer-
ican Librarian association being wom-
en.
"I fully believe that there is a good
(Continued on Page Five)
BUS LINE
ADRIAN-TECQMSEH-ANN ARBOR
Central Standard Time
Sun-I
NORTH Week day}

ANN ARBOR PHONE 84
207 EAST LIBERTY

YPSILANTI PHONE 171
114 PEARL

Imported
ENGLISH CAPS
Special $3.00 Each
711 N. UNIVERSITY

ARE YOU A WORK
OR A DRONE?
r
.. We have an opening for two real me
anxious to make money and have ambition
sonality to sell our well-known line of
paints and roof cements. Our goods are
dustrial Plants, Public Buildings and Pub]
everywhere. Previous sales experience not
as we furnish full information and instri
garding the sale of our goods. Liberal c
paid, and expenses advanced as soon as
demonstrated your sales ability. If you ar
and a sticker your NET earnings will be $
per month.
'Please give business references and sta
in which you wish to work.
THE WEAR TEST PRODU
CLEVELAND, OHIO
c nnnuiuniilnliiililmninlnn

9

ER

n who are
m and per-
industrial
sold to In-
lic Utilities
necessary,
uctions re-
ommissions
you tiave
e a worker,
300 to $500
te territory

Lv. Adrian-Main corners........
Lv. Tecumseh-Maim corners.....
Lv. Clinton-Main Corners...
Lv. Saline-Main Corners.......
Ar. AnnArbor-Main & Huron....
SOUTH
Lv. Ann Arbor-Huron & 4th Ave.
Lv.; Saline-Main Corners........
Lv. Clinton-Main Corners.
Lv. Tecumseh-Main Corners.
Ar. Adrian-Main. Corners......;

k k
7 45
8:25
8:45
9'35
io:xo
P.M.
4:35
510 o
4 :xo
6:20
7--0o

4 o
4:40
5 :Q3
5.50
6:25
P.M.
7 :oo
7:35
8:25
8:45
9:25

JCTS CO.

- lm

PRUNER'S
4
GENUINE NO. 3 SEAM POCAHONTAS
All indications are that you will save money by filling your base-
ment during this month or May if you contemplate using Pocahontas
or soft coal, as prices are sure to increase after May and Pocahontas
has taken an increase for May. When you are ready to fill your
basement we shall be very pleased to have your valued inquiry.
OFFICE 124 EAST HURON
THE PRUNER COAL. CO Phone Office 1950 F-1 Yard 1950-F2

WHY

DO YOU
SUPPOSE

TUTTLE'S

IS ALWAYS
CROWDED?

I

Ready to Serve
AT ANY THE
Open from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m
Pot of hot tea and bowl of ri
PLAIN CHOP SUE
85 CENTS
CHINESE and AMERICAN Sty
Short Orders
Quani Tuni L

I

E

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