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April 30, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-30

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WEATHER
AND COOLER
TODAY

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DAY AIfl N1l
BERMY

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VOL. XXXI. No. 144. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 1921. PRICE

.

ON DEPARTMENT
MADE OF RHETORIC
AND JOURNALISM

ACTION RESULT OF PETITION
NEWSPAPER MEN,
OF STATE

BY

SOPH LITS DANCE a
AT UNION TODAY
Arrangements are complete for the
soph lit dance at 2:30 o'clock this aft-
ernoon in the Union. The number of
tickets is limited to 215 and a capaci-
ty crowd is anticipated from the time
Nobe Weatherbee's eight-piece orches-
tra starts playing to the end of the
last dance.
Admittance will be 75 cents for men,
while women will be admitted with-
out charge. Tickets may be secured
at the Union desk or until 1 o'clock
today at George Wahr's bookstore.
The chaperones will be Mrs. T. E.
Rankin, Mrs. A. F. Whitney, Mrs. M.
Schemm, and Miss Hills.
REAR_ ING iiM

Senators Dev
the L

REGENTS EXTEND RULE
F OR PHYSICAL TESTS
Accept Loan Fund Donated by Soro-
sis Alumnae of
Detroit
Upon vote of the Board of Regents
at its meeting, yesterday the title of
the department of rhetoric was chang-
ed to the department of rhetoric and
journalism in recognition of the con-
stantly increasing importance which
is being placed on instruction in news-
paper work.
Prof. Fred N. Scott will continue to
be the head of the reorganized de-
partment, and will bear the rank of
professor of rhetoric and journalism.
Prof. John L. Brumm, who has here-
tofore held the rank of associate pro-
fessor of rhetoric, was given the rank
of professor of journalism. Professor
Brumm is directly in charge of all
courses in which newspaper instruc-
.tion is given at present.
Action Result of Petition
The action taken is the direct re-
sult of the petition presented to the
Regents in February by representa-
tive newspaper men of Michigan re-
questing that instruction in journalism
be placed on an equal footing with
other departments. The petition en-
dorsed the work now given, and re-
quested that the curriculum in jour-
nalism be broadened as rapidly as fa-
cilities permit.
A resolution was addpted by the
Regents calling for an extension of
the system of physical examinations
for University.students. Previous to
this year only freshmen have been
subject to examination. It is plan-
ned to examine an additional class
each year until all students will be
subject to annual physical examina-
tions.
To Examine Sophs
It is probable that the members of
the sodhomore class will be called
up for examination before the end of
the present semester. Next year, ac-
cording to present plans, freshmen,
sophomores and juniors will be ex-
amined. The following year all class-
es will be affected by the new ruling.
The change brought about by the res-
olution is in keeping with the Univer-
sity policy to enlarge the scope of the
Health service, and to offer all stu-
dents the opportunity for physical de-
velopment and correction of physical
defects.
Accept Loan Fund- ,
A loan fund of '$100 annually for
girls in the second semester of their
senior year was accepted by the Re-
gents from the Detroit alumnae
of the Collegiate Sorosis Sorority.
Senator Charles A. Sink reported the
gift to the Stearns' musical collection,
of an outfit of tuning and repairing
tools which were formerly the proper-
ty of Henry Sampson, of Ypsilanti.
The following resolution was adopt-
ed upon the recent death of Charles
B. G. de Nancrede, professor emeritus
of surgery in the Medical school:
"Whereas - The recent death of
Charles B. . de Nancrede marks the
passing from the academic and social
life of the University of a distinguish-
ed surgeon, a great teacher, and a re-
fined and cultivated gentleman of high
ideals and of true University type;
"Resolved-That the Board of Re-
gents expresses its affetiouate appre-
ciation of him and extends to his fam-
ily and friends its sympathy in a mu-
tual sorrow,"
(Continuea on Page Six)

BOTH SIDES
FOR MEA
(By As
Washington,
bate in the sen
ward a vote on
tion arrangedi
both friends a
adoption.
Opponents of
inated again
which also de
Democratic ran
of Missouri, m
in support of t
It was attach
cock of Nebras'
the foreign rel
Kellar, Democ

YOST CHEERFUL IN
TALK WITH SQUAD
N Coach Fielding H. Yost and over 60
of his prospective warriors for next
fallmet in the reading room of the
elop M'cth Interest in Union last night and talked over the
prospects of a winning football team
atest Move for for the coming season. The coach
Peace told the men that this football squad
has the greatest possibilities of any
PREDICT VICTORY since 1913. "I don't think this, I
SURE; VOTE TODAY know it," he stated. "I never saw a
spring practice where so nearly all
of the fellows were working.
Asocil 29-Sited de- "And let me tell you," he went on
to say, "without eligibility there is no
ate today proceeded to- chance for the team. The only way
the Knox peace resale- to make the team is to be one of the
for late tomorrow with 11 best men. The 10 men pho make'
ind foes conceding its the first aggregation have the right to,
the resolution predom- expectthat the best man will be given
a place. And the school, too, is right
in today's discussion,
veloped a break in the xI wish that.I could tell you boys
aks when Senator Reed an easy way of learning how to be
lade a lengthy address experts in playing football which oth-
the resolution. ers could not find out. But, even at
ked by Senators Hitch- that, I am not sure but that we are
ka, senior Democrat of better boys and better men because we
lations committee; Medo have to work fbr the things we
rat, Tennesee; Robin- get."'

SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS
M1EETING
The presidents of all the sen-
ior classes and the chairmen of
the reception and decorations
committees of the senior class-
es will meet today at 1:30 in
room 306 of the Union, for dis-
cussion on the following mat-
ters:
Swing-out line of march,
Days for wearing 'caps and
gowns,
Senior canes,
Senior sings,
Pageant,
All-campus election.
I~~~ ~ w ___________-_________________

6NSOCROSS, HA1
PROFESS(

APPOINTMENTS TAKI
IN SEPTEMBER I
CEPTED
ENGLISH DEPART
TO BE STRENG'
B9tI Men are Leaders in T
Increased Mill Tax
Choice Possibi

I U

Men Appear in Sweaters and Caps
Result of Movement Started
Recently

as

'Senior Law Paper.
Gives Legal Tone
To Crease ljance
From the weather prediction to the
advertisements, a delightful take-off
on The Daily columns, the annual
Crease paper made its appearance at
the senior law dance last night at the
Union and contributed in no small
degree to the legal atmosphere of the
occasion.

LEADERS WISH TO BRING
BACK CUSTOM ON CAMPUS
Excellent results were achieved the
second day of the movement among
Varsity men for the wearing of "M"
sweaters and caps on the campus, ac-
cording to athletic captains who were
interviewed yesterday. The marked
increase in the number wearing let-
ters was noticeable everywhere, caps
being particularly favored by the let-
ter men.
The object of the movement, accora-
ing to the men who are sponsoring it,
is, not to require them to wear insig-
nia at all times, but merely to make its
appearance on the campus so common
that the men may feel comfortable
when they do wish to appear in it.
COstom at Other Colleges
R. Jerome Dunne, captaip-elect of
football, said that Michigan was quite
unlike a number of other schools vis-
ited by athletic teams, where Varsity
men make it a practice to wear their
letters at all times. He added that
"M's" can only be worn at college
and the men while here should appre-
ciate the honor that they have won
and be eager to wear them.
Capt. Lawrence Butler, of track, said
that an "M" represents a real achieve-
ment and the men should be able to
wear it without fear of creating a
wrong impression. Once the move-
ment is started and some appear in
sweaters and caps all the men can feel
free to put them on at any time.
Farrell Adds Word
Coach Stephen J. Farrell added his
endorsement to those of the other
coaches, saying that men will feel that
an "M" stands for something much
more real when those who have earn-
ed them can be made to stand out from
the rest of the students. In this way
a strong inducement is offered to those
who are trying out and some real sat-
isfaction given to those who have
worked hard to earn them.
Prof. Cross Will
Visit South Seas
Coming Summer{
Prof. Arthur L. Cross, of-the history
department, has completed plans for a
trip to the South Pacific this summer,
with a visit to the island of Tahiti as
his chief object. He will start the
latter part of June and will stay till
the middle of September, joining an
old friend and college classmate, Har-
rison W. Smith, a well known traveler
and explorer, at the island.
The chief object of the trip is recre-
ation, according to Professor Coss,
although he plans at the same time to
make a comparative study of British
and French methods of colonial gov-
ernment, Tahiti being a French pos-
session.I
The course in the British empire
that Professor Cross had announced
for the Summer session this year will
be given by Prof. Paul Van Brunt
Jones, of the University of Illinois, a
brother-in-law of Prof. Charles H.
Cooley, of the sociology department.
Professor Jones was characterized by
Professor Cross as one of the most
prominent of the younger men in the
field of English history.

son, Democrat, Arkansas; and sup-f
ported by Senators Borah, Idaho; Kel-
logg, Minnesota; McCormick, Illinois,
and other Republicans.
During debate, Senator Pomerene.
Democrat, Ohio, filed a minority re-
port signed by all present Democratic
members of the foreign relations com-
mittee insisting that the resolution
"would prove' a disappointment" and
asserting it was an attempt "to usurp
the President's treaty making pow-
ers."
That the Knox resolution would in-
terfere with present German repara-
tions negotiations was emphasized'
today by its opponents. Senator Hitch-
cock declared the measure "Inoppor-
tune." He charged that Republicans,
by failing to speak in support of the
measure, were in "a conspiracy of sil-
ence' and also were' attempting to3
"flout" the President by dictating
terms for the settlement with Ger-
many.
This was denied by Senators Kellogg
and Reed, the latter declaring that
Mr. Harding has "invited" adoption of1
the resolution.t
UPPERCLASS MEETING
CALLED FOR, TOMORROWl

SUPPLEMENT TO HONOR
DAI1LY'S 30TH BIRTHDAY
PICTURES OF DAILY PLANT AND
PAPER'S HISTORY TO FEA-
TURE EDITION
The thirtieth anniversary of The
Michigan Daily will be commemorat-
ed in the feature section of tomorrow's
paper. It will be an attraction such
as has not been equaled since the
"Sleep edition". of The Daily which
caused such a furor on the campus
last February. The staff which has
prepared this supplement has devot-
ed its best effort toward making it a
memorable success.
Among the various features of this
edition will be a set of photographs
depictinghe Daily office with the
staff hard at work. Accompanying
these pictures wil be a complete his-
tory of the publication from the time
of its birth up to its present-day de-
gree of development, presenting the
remarkable strides forward which The
Daily has been taking in its 30 years
of existence on the Michigan campus.
A thorough explanation of the aims,
policies, and methods whicl} 'The Daily
seeks to employ throughout its organ-
ization will add one more interesting
feature to this different and distinctive
Sunday supplement.

JUNIORS AND SENIORS TO
CUSS SEVERAL CAMPUS
PROBLEMS

)IS-

Upperclassmen will hold their third
meeting this year for discussion, of
campus problems at 3:30 o'clock to-
morrow afternoon in the assembly
hall of the Union, according to an an-
nouncement made by LeGrand A.
Gaines, '21E, president of the Student
council.
William C. Palmer, '22L, who was
appointed chairman of the traditions
committee at the first meeting on Jan.
23, has a list of traditions drawn up
in detail and they will be considered
for adoption or rejection. An effort
will be made to keep the traditions
which are worth while and to elimin-
ate those which are out of ,date.
The coming All-campus election will
be one of the main points discussed.
Other questions will be convocations
and regular upperclass meetings for
next year and the attitude of the cam-
pus toward keeping off the grass,
TOLEDO ALUMNI TO EFFECT
REORGANIZATION SHORTLY
Toledo alumni began work on plans
to reorganize the Michigan graduates
of that city at a meeting Wednesday.
During the war, the alumni gather-
ings ceased and since that time no
attempt has been made to renew the
organization until the present time.
Prof. John L. Brumm, of the rhetor-
ic department, was present at the
gathering and made a talk. Formal
organization will take place in about
two weeks and an attempt will tlen be
made to bring together the large num-
ber of Michigan graduates now resid-
ing in Toledo,.
Prof. Talamon Speaks in Grand Rapids
Prof. Rene Talamon of the French
department delivered a lecture on a
Study Course in French last night be-
fore the Alliance Francais at Grand
Rapids. This lecture was given un-
der the auspices of the University
Extena.ion service.

SAND BOUNCE TOE OFFER.
CONCERT AND _FOUR ACTS
Four acts and a concert by the Var-
sity band will constitute the pro-
gram of the Spring Band Bounce to
be held next Thursday in Hill audi-
torium. One act has already been de-
cideĀ°upon by the committee, of which.
S. R. Bidwell, '23, is chairman.
The "Darling Four-tette" is to ap-
pear for the first time this year in an
altogether new assortment of songs
and will be composed of the four mem-
bers that have always been well re-
ceived at campus productions.
A 40-minute program will be given
by the Varsity band, led by Capt.
Wilfred B. Wilson. The numbers have
not been definitely decided on as yet
by the committee, but a number of
pieces have been practiced on by the
band for more than two months. A
short and snappy program is promis-
ed, fully up to standards of past years.
The proceeds from the Bounce will
be used to buy new uniforms for the
band and to send it on trips with the
Varsity teams. Lack of funds is a
serious handicap to the band at the
present time, according to officials of
that organization, and it is hoped that
enough will be realized to greatly en-
large its size and activities.
RADICAL DISCUSSION NEEDED
FOR ADVANCEMENT - COOLEY
That a discussion of radical ideas
and projects is necessary to the ad-
vancement of learning and civiliza-
tion was emphasized by Prof. Charles
Cooley, of the sociology department,
in a lecture on the "Value of Radical
Discussion" delivered last night at a
meeting of the Intercollegiate Socialist
society which was held in room P 162
Natural Science building.

Every phase of Law school routine
and as well as recreation comes in
for its share of publicity and judging
from the originality and timeliness of
the various articles the paper might
well be called a compilation of scoops.
Classified advertisements, a "what's
going on column", and a Daily offi-
cial bulletin contribute to the variety
of material in the number and give
ample opportunity for a review of
time-honored lost advertisements and
announcements of campus functions.
All the famous characters of the Law
school are given a chance to see their
names in print, varying from an an-
nouncement that Henry M. Bates
would appear in "Pragmatism and the
Constitution" at the Maj to the signa-
ture of our old friend Noah Count,
who has contributed an offspring of
his famous "Telescope" to the paper
in the form of a column headed "The
Microscope".
Clever satire and .genuine humor
combine to make the number a pleas-
ing souvenir and a bit of reading ma-
terial calculated to appeal to the
tastes of even the most critical of
readers.t
Players To Give
Spanish Dramaj
Jose Echegary's masterpiece, "The
Great Galeoto", will be presented May
25 and 26 in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall by the Players club. The drama,
which is to be given in English as
translated by Barrett H. Clark, is an
intense problem play, and its author
is considered one of the foremost
Spanish dramatists.
The necessary adaptions for stage
presentation have been made by Prof.
R. D. T. Hollister, of the public speak-
ing department, and the play will be
presented under his direction.
The cast has been selected and is
now practicing. Special scenery has
been planned by the stagecraft com-
mittee.,
Following are the meinbers of the1
cast: Dorothy Dodds, '21, Harold B.i
Lipsitz, '22, M. Josephine Shaffer, '21,
R. S. Tubbs, '22, J. Philip Holden, '22,
W. F. Hanselman, '22, Almond Fair-
field, '21, Robert Fitzgerald, '22, Ches-
ter F. Kuhn, 22, and Elizabeth J.
Hamer, '22.
DESTROYER SQUADRON BASE
TO BE AT NARRAGANSETT BAY
(By Associated Press)
Newport, R. I., April 29. - Narra-
gansett Bay is to be the base of the
destroyer squadron of the Atlantic
fleet this summer. The rendezvous
will bring 150 destroyers and auxil-
iary vessels to these waters. Five de-
stroyers have already arrived.
The main. fleet of destroyers, it
has just been announced, will leave
Charleston, S. C., their winter base,
on May 15, and proceed to New York
for a stay of two weeks to permit the
crews to have snore liberty. The
squadron, under command of Rear
Admiral A. H. Robertson, will then
proceed to Narragansett Bay, arriving
about June 5.

Prof. rom Peete Cross, of
versity of Chicago, and Pol
Holly Hanford, of the Unive
North Carolina, were elected
professorships in the English
ment of the University Dy th
of Regents at its meeting y4
The appointments will becon
tive at the opening.of the U
in September, if the elections
eepted.
Strengthens Departme
The appointments were mad
recommendation of Dean Joh
finger and with the approval <
dent\Marion L. Burton. By t
pointments, the department
lish, which has suffered for
years from lack of a sufficieni
staff of instruction, will be
meet the demands placed upon
pansion of the English staff
possible through the increas
mill tax which was voted tliis
the legislature for the suppor
University. The election of t
to full professorships in the s
partment at one time is an
occurrence. It is said to be ar
tion of the program of .deve
which will be permitted by
crease in the income of the
sity.
Cross Leading Authori
Professor Cross is a grad
Hampton Sidney college and
*Ph.D. degree from Harvard.
recognized as one of the lea
thorities on the Celtic languag
country. He is tVi author of
works which attest to his
ability and his position as ,a
tive scholar.- His special field
of comparative literature. P
Cross is 42 years old.
Professor Hanford is a gra
Rochester university and has
ceived the Ph.D. degree from I
He is known as an authority
literature of Milton's period, a
present carrying in extensive x
work on the writings of Milt
has been eminently successfi
university teacher and holds
rank in scholarship. Profegs
ford, who is '39 years old, h
very successful in his writin
UnionA Will Lis
Drama tic T
An effort to get hold defin
all the dramatic talent on the
will be made by the Union in t
few weeks. E. Mortimer Chu
rector of Union dramatics, am
yesterday that he wants to me
eligible man or group of mn<
have acts or skits which can 1
ed at some future time.
Form-ards which contain th4
of men who have dramatic abil
been filed at the Union, but Mr
wishes to get into still closer
with the men in order to find
degree of their ability and the
their acts.
Records will be bept by the t
and the men will be called up
time to time tp supply numi
the combined musical clubs'
Spotlights, the Opera, and othe
theatricals. 'Mr. Shuter will i
tryouts and observe their acts
to 4 o'clock each afternoon
office, room 308 of the Union.
ADELPHII HOLD DANCE TO
IN BARBOUR GYM'
An All-campus spring matin
will be given under the auspic
Adelphi House of Representa

2:30 o'clock this afternoon in
gymnasium. Rhodes' orchest
play for the dancing, which v
~ - -~lK ~lnl ibn.

-W I

SENIOR LITS I
Several seniors have sent in
checks for their invitations and
have no bank balance. These,
checks must be made good today
in order to have their orders go
in with the others. No invita-
tions will be ordered for these
seniors unless this matter is at-
tended to.
SENIOR LIT INVITATION
COMMITTEE.

!I

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