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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 20, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
ublication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
dited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffiee at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
a matter.
Subscription, by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Comnmunications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
are not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
h* and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
:retion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily'ofice.
igned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
ript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily. does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
wsed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after S o'clock
the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414

students. The goal of their efforts was the estab-
lishment of a series of Sunday evening student
services in Hill auditorium.
The movement was a success from the start. It
gave the man or woman of the University a very
worth-while way to spend the early part of Sun-
day evening; and it furnished him an opportunity
to hear some of the biggest men in the country on
topics which should be of vital interest to us all.
But above all else, this movement tended to show
the student at Michigan the real purpose of the
Sabbath and to encourage him toward better habits
as regards the church than most of us have.
This year the movement is being continued un-
der the direction of a committee composed, with a
few exceptions, of the same group of students who
aided in inaugurating the movement last fall. Be-
ginning next Sunday night with a talk by President
Marion L. Burton, the Union services of this year
will give the student achance to hear without ex-
pense a group of eminent men treating subjects in
the consideration of which the education of the
average man or woman is often lacking. The plan
deserves Michigan's continued support.

.......... .

GRAH iV

(Two Stores)

Both

Ends of the.

Diag onal Walk

G AHA

RAGING EDITOR ........-...GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
s Editor.................-.----... Chesser M. Campbel
t Hordams H. W. Hitchcock
B. . Campbe J. E.McManis
B. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
e ud Sherwood .....................J. A. Bernstein
)rials........... Lee Woodriff, Robert Sage, T. J. Whinery
.................. . . .... Robert Angell
:tant News.... ........................ E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
nen s Editor.......-.-...................Mary Dlane
graph. ...................... ..........etGlol
cope .................................Jack W. Kelley
Assistants
ihine Waldo Robert D. Sage L. Armstrong Kern
G. Weber Frances Oberholtzer Huston McBain
na Barlow Robert E. Adams Frank H. McPike
beth vickery Norman C. Damon, Gerald P. Overton
Clark Byron Darnton Edward Lambrecht
ge Reindel' Thomas E. Dewey William M.' Riley, Jr.
)thy Monfort Wallace F. Elliott Sara Waller
y B. Grundy Leo J. Hershdorfer

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Efect dune Ik 19M0
Between
Detroit, Ann Arber and Jaoksoe
(astern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:10 a. ix. and hourly to
9: 10 p. in.
Liiteds to Jaekson at 8: 48 a. in. aud
every two houts to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.w., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m.' To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m. and 1:10 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

......OW

The Blue Front

Cigar Store

SUGAR BOWL
HONE MADE CANDY
ABSOLUTELY CLEAN
BEST LINE IN THE CITY
EVERYTHING
MADE IN ANN ARBOR
LIGHT LNNCIeIS
ANN ARBOR
SUGAR BOWL

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24

_ _._

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone-9600
BUSINESS MANAGER........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising ...................-.-+--.-....D. P. Joyce
Credits............ ......................... W Rawlgs
Publication ...................................$. M. Heath
Accounts*...................................... . R. Priehs
Circulation...... ..........................V. F. 1ileIry
x Assistants
R. W. Lmbreeht B. G. Gower Lester W. Millard
Robert 0. Kerr Sigmund Kunstadter
The night editors for the week will be as fol-
lows: Monday night, Jack Dakin; Tuesday night,
Thornton Sargent ; Wednesday night, Brewster
Campbell; Thursday night, Hugh Hitchcock; Fri-
day night, Thomas Adams; Saturday night, John
McManis.
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1920.
The Daily announces the appointment of the
following to the editorial staff: Night editor,
Renaud Sherwood; Assistants, Robert E. Adams,
Jack W. Kelley, sNorman C. Damon, By-
ron Darnton, Thomas E. Dewey, Wallace F.
Elliott, Leo J. Hershdorfer, L. Armstrong Kern,
Huston McBain, Frank H. McPike, Gerald P.
Overton, Edward Lambreht, William M. Riley
Jr., Sara Waller. V. F. Hillery has been ap-
pointed circulation manager.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
'The first woman was admitted to the University
of Michigan in February, 1870, one month after
the passing of a resolution by the Board of Re-
gents stating that "no rule exists in any of the
University statutes for the exclusion of any per
son from the University who possesses the neces-
sary literary and moral qualifications."
"PIPE IT UP" ALL W EK
Enthusiasm usually is thought of as something
that springs up like a great flame, as though all
the emotions had run together at once into a pas-
sion of admiration and active support for the man,
the team, or the movement at the bottom of it. As
a matter of fact, enthusiasm can be grown as well
as "sprung;" it can pick up momentum like the "lo-
comotive"; and when it does, the total effect is
greater than the kind that comes "on the spur."
Progressive Pep is what Michigan wants for the
Illinois game: Everybody agrees that in order to
win it every factor has got to be put in full play,
and that enthusiasm and spirit must mount to
heights that even Michigan has not ascended be-
fore. We've got to think up, talk up, yell up the
idea of- "Beat Illinois" until those stands Saturday
afternoon will be pandemonium with the yell-lead-
ers as the gauge-cock. The team will notice that
kind of spirit ,and play better for it.
Friday night the greatest "coats off" pep meet-
ing in history is planned for Hill auditorium. Be-
fore that time, Michigan's throats should be aching
to let out the yells which spell for the teami the
mighty backing of every man and woman among
the eight thousand. Wednesday, Thursday, Fri-
day-three days To spread the gospel that will fill
Hill auditorium until the police howl for help to
enforce the ordinance. Let's make the Michigan
enthusiasm of October 21, 22, 23, and 24, 1920, a
model for all future yell leaders, pep meeting
speakers, Cap Night orators to point back to-the
apex of Michigan loyalty.
"Beat Illinois !" Got it?
THE UNION SERVICES
Last year a group of upperclassmen, who had the
best interests of the University student body at
heart, banded themselves together to institute some
means of encouraging church attendance among the

A TRADITION FORGOTTEN?
When the University contributed $5po for the
purchase of a memorial flagpole to the Michigan
men who died in the war, it was intended to es-
tablish a tradition that. at each game the band
would march down the field and back, halt before
the pole, and play "The Star Spangled Banner" as
the Stars and Stripes were raised, while the crowd
reverently uncovered, thus providing a few minutes
devoted to the memory of the men whom Michigan
never intends to forget.
This ceremony was neglected at the first twt foot-
ball games this season. Military organizatons on
the campus have rightly taken up the matter, as
this tradition is one that should be zealously
guarded for all time.
GOING BEYOND THE TEXT
Perhaps the most natural reaction on reading the
statement of Royal Library Commissioner Hjelm-
grist of "Sweden that the University of Michigan
library affords better facilities for students than any
library in Europe is to feel gratified and let it go at
that. Why not derive a more positive benefit?
To many who are desirous of an education but un-
able to continue in school, reading is the most im-
portant means of becoming well-informed. It is not
unusual to find a man successful in life who has
never attended college but is so well-read that he
can meet the average university graduate on his
own ground in conversation. If individuals out-
side of college can benefit so much by reading, the
student, who has the added convenience of the Uni-
versity library and the guidance of the class-room,
will be well repaid for the effort he expends mak-
ing use of the authoritative books that the Univer-
sity places at his disposal.
If we read up on subjects assigned for themes
instead of relying solely on making up somthing
feasible out of our own imagination, and if we sup-
plement the required texts with reading we our-
selves have chosen, we shall find that some of the
drudgery of studying has disappeared. Reading is
one of the important means by which men keep up
to date in their life work after they have left col-
lege. Let us acquire the habit now while the un-
usual facilities of the University library are avail-
able. z
~~ Th elescope
The maid's so very quiet,
What can the trouble be?
And so's my loving hubby-
Just a moment, pardon me.
Our girl remarked to us the other might that she
was going to try out for the chorus of the Junior
girls' play this year. To this we promptly rejoined,
"Gee,-that'll be a hard part you'll have." "Don't
show your ignorance of the theatre," she replies,
"why I wont have to say a word." Pondering over
this awhile we finally comes forward with,
"I know it. That's what makes it hard for you."
Curtain
Her Daily Lamentation
My men will soon desert me,
('Tis this thought that drives me wild)
And the chilly blast will rattle the panes,
While my poor, blue blood freezes fast in my veins,
And I'll be as sad as an orphaned child.
For the winter time is coming,
('Tis presaged by the fall wind's gush)
And while other co-eds in fur coats will be wooed,
Poor me on the campus will feel half nude,
In my little brown.coat of plush..
Lately in our efforts to be a regular college boy
we have tried to raise a moustache. Its sow growth
has worried us considerably, so we remarked to a
friend the other day, "I wonder what color my
moustache will be when it comes out?"

He studied our classic profile carefully for a feW
moments and then remarked gravely, "Gray, at the
rate it's growing."
Famous Closing Lines
"It was a tight squeeze," he said as he took the
crumpled cigars out of his vest-pocket.
NOAH COUNT.

a i fi Ir+ '

and the Near East where he has
for the University."

been occupied in photographic work

l

IF IT'S ANYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC

ASK SWAIN--PHONE

2312

S EDET OWNED
Corner of State and Packard

4

"G. R. Swain returned Sept. 25 after a year's absence in Europe

FOR CAREFUL INTELLIGENT DEVELOPING AND PRINTING,
LEAVE YOUR FILMS AT
713 EAST U. AVE., OR AT 'THE QUARRY DRUG STORE

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