100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 20, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SHOWERS;
COOLER TODAY

Ap
-AL AK ANAL
4w

atit

ASSOCIAT
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 14. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1920. PRICE FIVE C

...

BRITISH HOUSE Of
COMMONS 0EBTES
STRIKESITUATI1ONj
ORDER MAINTAINED BY MINERS
IN AFFECTED COAL
DISTRICTS
TRANSPORT WORKERS
THREATEN WALK-OUT
passenger Steamer Service Between
England and Ireland
Suspended
(By Associated Press)
London, Oct. 19.-The House of
Commons today discussed the coal
strike with great moderation but
without arriving at a nearer pros-
pect of a settlement. Premier Lloyd
George explained his unemployment
scheme but contributed nothing to the
coal discussion, which was largely
confined to the labor members. The
latter emphasized the necessity of ar-
riving at a settlement before the dis-
pte grew to graver proportions. Sev-
eral members suggested that the min-
ers' demands should be granted tem.-
porarily pending the creation of a
permanent wage board.
No Further Developments
There were no further develop-
ments of importance in the strike to-
day. In all the coal regions where
the men have laid down their tools,
order was maintained by the strikers.
One feature of the situation tonight
which bore possibilities of widening
the strike was the prospect that 25,-
000 London commercial road trans-
port men would cease work. The
transport men have passed a resolu-
tion declaring their support of the
miners and are to meet tomorrow to
make a final decision.
Railroads Restrict Tradfce
Announcement was made tonight
of the suspension of sailage of near-
ly all passenger steamers between
England and Ireland. Railroads al-
so are being ordered to restrict their
passenger service.
KAHN TO ADDRESS-
REPUBLICAN RALLY
Hon. Julius Kahn, of California,
will address the Republican rally at
7:30 o'clock tonight in the Whitney
theater. Mr. Kahn is paid by Prof. W.
H. Hobbs, of the geology department,
"to have made a splendid record as
chairman of the Military Affairs com-
mittee in congress during the recent
preparedness agitation."
M0usic will be furnished by a quar-
tette from the School of Music. Mr.
V. R Van Ameringen, chairman of
the Washtenaw County Republican
committee, will have charge of the
meeting, which is for all interested in
the national issues. The gathering
is under the Joint auspices of the
University and the County Republican
clubs.
SMOKER OF FORESTRY CLUB
IS SET FOR 7:30 TONIGHT
All forestry students are urgently
requested to attend the iorestry club
smiker, at 7:30 o'clock Wednesday
evening in room 214, Natural Science
building. Freshmen especially should
be there as it is their duty to become

acquainted with the forestry faculty
and members of the club.
GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUB
MEMBERS TO MEET TONIGHT
Glee and Mandolin club officials an-
nounced yesterday that all former
members of the organization are
wanted at the meeting called at 7:15
o'clock this evening in the Musical
activities room of the Union.
The first call issued included only
those men who made the coast trip
last year.
GARGOYLE STAFF MEETS
Gargoyle staff meeting at 3
O'clock Wednesday at editorial
office. Editorial and art staffs
and tryouts requested.

Quality, Watchword Of Editors Of
Chimes, Volume Two, Number One

Of Which Will
(By L. M. W.)
Chimes, volume two, number one,
goes on sale today.
It is going to be bought and read,
from title page to finis. "The Quest
of Quality", which is the name Presi-
dent Burton has penned to his open-
ing article, has been the watchword
of the editors, and in the October
Chimes Michigan has achieved, a real
magazine. A news story is not sup-
posed to editorialize, but honor to
whom honor is due.
Front Cover Good
Aside from the front cover, which
with its reproduction in colors of the
famous "front porch" portrait of
"Prexy" should draw subscribers
much faster than the pretty girls on
the average news-stand, there are
some 12 other reasons why the cam-
pus may be expected to keep its opin-
ion and literary magazine decidedly

Go On Sale Today
on its feet in today's subscription.
Those 12 reasons comprise the table
of contents.
Throughout, the policy of putting
the "what the campus wants" punch
into every page has been adhered to.
Burton, many words of him, we all
want; his article comes first by right
and by quality; and from the presi-
dent's paper on the idea has evident-
ly been to get competent authority-
on athletics, on traditions, on all
sorts of campus topics-but the au-
thority of the senior and the recent
alumnus, and not that of the out-
sider.
There is "The Making of the 1920
Football Team," by Russell Barnes
and B. P. C., a careful study of the
toil and the technique that go into
the season's product of Fielding H.
Yost's methods. "Russ" has also con-
(Continued on Page Six)

OCT. 24 SET FOR LEAGUE OF NATIONS
DAY BY NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC PARTY

RESERVED SEATS FOR
ILLINOIS GAME SOLD
With all of the 22,500 reserv-
ed seats sold for the Illinois game
the attendance at the contest next
Saturday afternoon promises to
be one which will tax Ferry
field's accommodations to the
limit. The last reserved seat was
sold before the Athletic asso-
ciation office closed Tuesday,
afternoon, and the only hope
left for those who wish to see
the game and who do .not have
tickets is to purchase standing
room at the field ticket offices
before the game.
A block of 500 seats has been
reserved for Illinois, and it is
doubtful if this section will be
large enough to accommodate
the supporters of the Indians
who are expecting to accompany
the team to Ann Arbor.
PRESS BURTON 9ADDESSES
WOMEN OF UNIVERSITY

'OVER THE TOP" IS SUBJECT
TALI IN HILL AUDI.
TORIU

OF

"Over the Top!" This was the sub -
ject of the address which President
Marion L. Burton made to the women
of the University and town at a meet-
ing conducted under the auspices of
the Women's league yesterday after-
noon in Hill auditorium. "To the
soldier," said President Burton, "the
words, 'Over the Top,' meant that the
supreme moment of achievement had
come. All that had gone before had
been merely preparation.'
Student Should Prepare
He then pointed out that the four
years which the student spends in
college should represent, a period of
preparation for what is to follow; for
the time when he is to go "over the
top."
"It is not only after graduation
though that there are issues to be
met, and enemies to be overcome," he
said. "College should mean an actual
period of preparation, and while we
are here, we can begin going 'over
the top' against laziness, and selfish-
ness."
Wasting of time, superficiality, ir-
reverence, and a certain type of dis-
honesty were also spoken of as vices
against which the college student
must wage a constant fight.
Describes Objectives
In closing, he described that objec-
tive for which Michigan women
should strive, and for which they
should "go over the top"-a finer
womanhood, which will be able to
benefit by its remarkable opportui-
ties and to accept its new responsi-.
bilities.
Following the meeting, there was a
reception for, members of the Wom-
en's league in Barbour gymansium,
at which President Burton and Mrs.
Burton were guests of honor,

Professor Phillips of History Depart-
ment Approves League in Leter
t.
October 24 will be observed through-
out the United States as League of
Nations day under the auspices of the
national Democratic party, and a
special committee has been appointed
to arrange for its observance, with
headquarters at the Hotel Murray
Hill, New York City.
In a telegram received by Prof.
Ulrich B. Phillips of the history de-
partment, the committee names Oct.
24 as the date for the celebration,
and requests a statement from him
regarding his opinion concerning the
League of Nations. In reply, the fol-
lowing statement was forwarded by
Professor Phillips to the committee:
"The United States is, in itself, a
living example of the solidarity of
civilization; its constitution is a pat-
tern in the combining of central au-
thority with home rule; and the
wholesome tradition of its people is
to accept responsibility.
Congress Was Partisan
"Following the American civil war,
it is generally though regretfully
agreed, a predominance of partisan-
ship in congress perverted the work
of reconstruction of the Union. The
errors of that day should now serve
as a warning.
"The Great war and its great end-
ing have brought the world, in many
senses, close to America. Today we
stand at the parting of the ways. To
ratify the government and to labour
in the League of Nations for the ac-
complishment of its high purpose is to
embrace an opportunity of the ages.
To shirk this duty would be unthink-
able,"
While no plans have been made
public regarding the nature of the
celebration, an announcement is ex-
pected soon by the American news-
papers.
Although opinions of faculty men
regarding the League of Nations are
many and varied, general sentiment
seems to favor the establishment of
such a body as a step toward the fut-
ure betterment of the world.
"When we entered the world war,"
said Registrar Arthur G. Hall in a
statement Tuesday, "we agreed to
keep faith with the enlightened na-
tions of the world in regard to mak-
ing the world safe for democracy. Al-
though the war is over we are yet un-
der pact to keep that faith."
Bonner for League
When questioned in regard to his
opinion concerning the league, Prof.
Campbell Bonner of the Greek depart-
ment, said: "I believe that the United
States could become a party to the
League of Nations, even under the
(Continued on Page Six)
DELAY BY PRINTERS CAUSES
FIRST GARGOYLE TO BE LATE
Due to delay on the part of the
printers, the October issue of the
Gargoyle will not appear today as
previously announced. Freshmen and
sophomore tryouts for the business
and editorial staff of the Gargoyle are
desired. Anyone wishing to secure a
place on the staff should see the busi-
ness manager or the managing editor
any afternoon in the Press build-
ing.

UINION SERICES
TO BEGIN SUNDAY,
BURTON SPEAKING
MUSICAL PROGRAM UNDER D)IREC-
TION OF WILLIAM
WHEELER
SHORT TALK WILL BE
GIVEN BY BAXTER, '21
Program Will Me Completed at Meet-
ing of Committee to Be Held
Thursday Afternoon
Inaugurating the University Union
services for this year, President Mar-
ion L. Burton will speak next Sun-
day night in Hill auditorium on the
subject, "The Function of Religion in
College Life."
In addition to the address of Pres-
ident Burton, there will be a musical
program, which is under the direc-
tion of William Wheeler, head of the
University School of Music. The pro-
gram will consist of a vocal selec-
tion, a numberxbya picked double
quartette of mixed voices, organ
numbers, and hymns.
Grindley Is Chairman
Fred J. Petty, '21, is to preside
over the services this year, and Rob-
ert F. Grindley, '21E, is chairman of
the committee on University services.
C. Stewart Baxter, '21, president of
the University Y. M. C. A., will make'
a short talk on the "Y", its func-
tions, and the work it is planning for
this year.
The program for the Sunday serv-
ice will be completed at the meeting
of the University Service committee
'hursday afternoon, which, at that
time, will also choose new members
for this year. The present member-
ship consists of those who acted last
year, but will be increased by the
election of several more men and
women, prominent in campus affairs.
Evans Praises Burton
Speaking of the address Sunday
night, T. S. Evans, general secretary
of the "Y", who has held the similar
position at Princeton and Pennsylva-
nia universities and has been con-
nected with University religious work
for the past 20 years, said, "President
Burton is, in my estimation, the best
fitted man in the country at the pres-
ent time to talk on the religious side
of University life.
"His experience as the head of two
large institutions of learning, his stud-
ies, his books, and his close contact
with student life place him in a po-
sition where he has no equal in an
intimate knowledge of the subject he
will talk on. I believe the service
Sunday will be the biggest thing in
that line that will be In Ann Arbor
this year.''
UNIVERSI TY CINICS
IUURATEDIN STT
Under the auspices of the Univer-
sity Hospital staff the first extension
clinics ever held in this country by
a university will be conducted in
Michigan beginning Wednesday, Oct.
20. The first of these clinics will be
held at Houghton, Mich., by doctors
from our University Hospital staff.

The clinic this week will be con-
ducted, by Dr. Van Zwaluwenberg,
head of the X-ray department, Dr.
Reuben Peterson, chief of the obstet-
rics department, Dr. L. H. Newburgh,
acting physician in charge, and Dr.
Hugh Cabot, chief surgeon.
A provision has been made whereby
~the state pays the expenses incurred
by these clinics. In addition to the
State extension clinics, a local clinic
is being conducted the second Wed-
nesday of each month 'at the' Univer-
sity hospital. All practicing medics
are invited to attend these clinics.
LA RUE BECOMES INSTRUCTOR
AFTER RETURN FROM SUMATRA
Carl D. La Rue, who recently re-
turned from Sumatra, has assumed
the duties of instructor of botany in
the University. He was employed by
the United States Rubber company up
to the time of his departure from the
South Sea island.

1

CLASSES NOMINATE
MEN FOR OFFICES
Results of the various class bal-
lotings yesterday afternoon have been
tabulated, two for each office from a
class being nominated.
In the senior literary elections the
following men were nominated: For
president, Fred J. Petty, Albert J.
Jacobs; for vice-president, Aletha
Yerkes, Dorothy Dodds, Eleanor Stev-
enson; for secretary, Jean Wallace,
Katrina Schermerhorn; for treasurer,
John McManis, Dwight Joyce: for
football manager,Lowell. Genebach,
Fred Fletcher.
Results of the junior literary nom-
inations are: For president, Maurice
Atkinson, 0. W. Rush; for vice-presi-
dent, Hazel Story, Margaret Stone;
for secretary, Brewster Campbell,
Zella Carr; for treasurer, FrancisI
M. Smith, R. Jerome Dunne.
The junior engineers nominated:
For president, Douglas Dow, Eugene
Harbeck; for vice-president, Milton
Goetz, Emerson Swart; for secretary,
Edward Bradley, Walter Simmons; for
treasurer, George McCordin, Herbert
Shaw; for football manager, Kenneth
Ronan, Daniel Kearney.
Fresh engineers will cast their
nomiiating ballots at 11 o'clock this
morning in University Hall. Sopho-
more lits will cast their nominating
ballots at 3 o'clock this afternoon in
room 205 of ,Mason hall, and sopho-
more engineers will meet at 5 o'clock
this evening in room 348 of the Eng-
ineering building for the same pur-
pose,
The date for the nominations in the
Dental college will be announced in
the Daily Official Bulletin either today
or tomorrow.
At a meeting held Tuesday after-
noon the senior architects elected the
following class officers: President,
E. D. Straight, vice-president, G. P.
Shaefer, secretary, Joseph Goddyne,
and treasurer, A. A. Roemer.
SCHEDUES BRYAN
"Where the Nine" Chosen as Subject
of First Address of
Year
OTHER FAMOUS SPEAKERS
WILL APPEAR ON PROGRAM
William Jennings Bryan has oeen
secured for Nov. 6 to give the first
lecture in the course given by the
Oratorical association. Mr. Bryan
will speak on the subject, "Where the
Nine."
The lecture course under the au-
spices of the Oratorical association
will consist of 10 numbers, which will
be given on the dates previously an-
nounced in Hill auditorium. Every
number on the course this season fea-
tures some speaker of great renown.
Among the other speakers who
have been secured for this season are
Albert J. Beveridge, who will speak
on the subject, "John Marshall and
the Constitution," and Stephen Lea-
cock, who will be remembered from
the program of last year.
Emmeline Pankhurst, the noted
English suffragette, will speak on
"Woman's Suffrage and Bolshevism."
Season tickets for the course may be
secured for $2.50 or in the reserved
section for $3. The tickets are now
on sale at Wahr's, at Graham's and on

the campus.
PROFESSOR RIGGS TO SPEAK
AT CAMP DAVIS MEN'S SMOKER
Prof. Henry E. Riggs, head of the
civil engineering department, will
speak at the first smoker of the Camp
Davis men, to be held at 7:30 o'clock
Thursday evening at the Union.
"Sandy" Sanborn, '21E, will entertain
with an eccentric dance, and refresh-
ments will be served.
UNDERCLASS DISCIPLINE TO
BE CONSIDERED BY COUNCIL
A meeting of the Student council is
to be held this evening at 7:30 o'clock
in room 306 of the Union. The sub-
ject to be discussed is underclass dis-
cipline. All men elected to the coun-
cil last year are urged to be at theI
meeting.

FIRST COUNT OFS
STUDENTS SHOWS
83137 ON CAMPUS.
MORE ACCURATE SUMMARY WILL
BE MADE BY REGISTRAR
NOV. 1
HALF OF REGISTRATION
IN LITERARY COLLEGE
Final Figure for Year to Come Close
to Original Estimate of 10,500
Made by Hall
According to the preliminary count
from registration figures, Just com-
pleted by Registrar Hall's office, there
are now on the campus, 8,137 stu-
dents, as against 7,384 for the same
period last year. The count is as
accurate as it is possible to ascer-
tain at the present time in a preim-
inary count. Another summary will
be made Nov. 1.
The final figures come close to the
original estimate of 10,500 given out
by Registrar Hall, amounting to 10,-
638 including the Summer session, ex-
tension classes and nurses registra-
tion, and estimated later registra-
tions.
Half Are Lit Students
Of the total 5,013, or nearly half,
are registered in the College of Lit-
erature, Science and the Arts. The
Engineering school has a registration
of 2,086, the Medical school 444, Uni-
versity Nurses training 159, Law
school 346, Pharmacy college 93,
Homeopathic Medical school 47, with
Nurses' Training 38, Dental college
442, Graduate school 258, Summer
session 1,200, and an estimated later
registration of 600.
All departments show an increase,
with the exception of the Nurses'
classes, which have a small de-
crease.
As for the proportion of men and
women on the campus, Dr. Hal
states that there are about. 1,600
women or a proportion of one to five.
In the lit school the proportion runs
more evenly, coming up to one to
two.
Summer Students Enter in Fall
Summer school figures seem at va-
riance with the total number attend-
ing, due to the fact that many going
through Summer school also enter
the fall semester.
The extension classes are those
held in neighboring cities by different
professors and for which university
creditsis given. Registration in these
classes will not, however, amount to
much more than 500, according to Dr.
Hall, and the figures are not includ-
ed in the number of students on the
campus.
Charm Of Poet
Given To Reital3
-ily Gabrilowitseh
(By L. L. N.)
With all the charm of a poet pian-
ist, Ossip Gabrilowitsch gave to the
Matinee Musical patrons a real treat
last night with his piano recital. His
wonderful technique coupled with his

intelligent interpretation of Chopin
and his magnetic personality served
him well in the presentation of his
program. His playing was full of
warmth, beauty, and charm, while his
wonderful technique was held in con-
stant subjection in order that he
might present the beauty of Chopin's
masterpieces.
Opening his program with Chopin's
"Ballade, A flat major, Op. 48," he
pictured a tone poem of infinite color
and charm. Beginning with a grace-
ful sympathetic movement, he worked
up to the climax with the grace of a
finished artist. His interpretation of
the "Marcia funebre" was an inspir-
ational appeal to the best, free from
sensationalism, yet stirring and up-
lifting.
Before intermission, Mr. Garilo-
witsch was: forced to take a number
of bows, but the audience was not sat-
isfied until he sat down to the piano
again and played an encore, which
was well earned.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan