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April 26, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

:

)FFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
blished every morning except Monday during the Univer-
ar -by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ie Associated Press isaexclusively entitled to the use fbr
ication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
d in this paper and the local news published therein.
itered at the -postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
natter.
bscription by carrier er mail, $3.50.
fices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
ones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
mmunications not to exceed Soo words, if signed, the sig-
not necessarily to appear in ptint, but as an evidence of
nd notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
ion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
led communications will receive no consideration. No man
will be returned unless the writer incluses postage.
e Daily does~ not necessarily endorse the sentimentsi ex-
I in the communications.
hat's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
evening preceding insertion.
EDTORL STAFF
Telephone 2414
GING EDITOR ........ .GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
Editor ..,. ....Chesser M am,
an EditorialBoard......................Lee Woodruff
i~ditrs-
t H,Adam H. W. Hitchcock
J. 1.Dakin J. E. McManis
Renaud Sherwood T. W. Sargent, Jr
Editor. . .. .._.. .. ....3. A. Bernstein
ditor........ ...........B. P. Campbell
a15..........T. 3. Whinery, L. .A. Kern, S. TC. Beach
................Robert Angell
n's Editor........ ...ary D. Lane
ph...... . ..Thomas Dewey
)P. ... .......................... .....jack W.KRely

ne Walde
.Webei
h Vickery
lark
Reindel
B. Grundy
Oberholtzer
R. Adams
Fr Elliott
n McBain

Assistants
Frank H. McPike
J. A. Bacon
W. W.aOttaway
Paul Watzel,
Byron Darnton
M. A. Klaver
F,. R. peiss
Walter Donnelly
Beata Hasley
Kathrine Montgomery

Sidney B. Coates
C.' T. Pennoyers
Marion B. Stahl
Lowell S. Kerr
Marion Koch
Dorothy Whipple
Gerald P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht
Sara Waler
H. E. Howlett

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
INESS MANAGER............LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
ertising ...........D P. toyce
sifieds.......................S .Kinstadter
& --ation .......... ...................... F. M. H~eath
ounts ......... .-... --. -- . R. Priehs
"iation...... ........................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
W. Lambrecht M. M. Moule H. C. Hunt
J. Hamel, Jr. N. W. Robertson M. S. Goldring
. Hutchinson Thos. L. Rice F. W. Hleidbreder
A. Cross R. G. turchell W. Cooley,
obt. 1,. Davis A. J. Parker
Persons wishing to secure Information concerning news for any
e of The Daily should se the night ,ditor, who has full charge
il news to be printed that night. _.____________

TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 1921.

_. ..,-

ig4 i~Editor-HUGH W. HITCHCOCK

________- .-

ere will be ani important meeting of the,
rial staff and tryouts at 4:30 o'clock this

entire
after-

FOLLOWING THE RULES
The disqualifying of Capt. Vernon Parks, just
prier to the opening of Michigan's baseball season
this year, has caused newspapers to open fire with
scorching editorials against the practice of prohi-
biting college players frota engaging in professional
baseball, and foremost among these exponents of a,
change in the rules is the Chicago Tribune.
The proposition, as set forth in the editorial col-
umns of that paper, is that the student athlete has
a perfect right to put himself through school 'by
playing professionally during the summer, and
should not be prevented from doing so by a system
which, in the eyes of the Tribune, is simply a re-
vival of the English caste idea, unworthy of Amer-
ican democracy.
The Tribune is right. The man who plays base-
ball in college is generally better equipped to make
real money through the following of professional
ball during the summer than he is in any other
field. Professional football may be.antagonistic to
the best interests of the intercollegiate game. But
football is essentially a college sport, whereas base-
ball and other forms of athletics come under an-
other category ; and the man who goes into base-
ball for money during his vacations is thereby
not only enabled to improve his playing ability, but
can do much toward making his way financially
.much easier the following year. That the "summer
pro" college player should be excluded from the
ranks of the intercollegiate sport is unfair, especially
when his brother players, in certain colleges, can
often secure "soft" positions of one kind and an-
other connected with the school, which will largely
pay their way without much effort on their part,
the only condition being that they do their best to-
ward upholding the athletic standing of the institu-
tion.
The general attitude is, of course, somewhat di-
vided on the proposition which our ,experience this
year has brought into the foreground. Officials at
some universities are strongly in favor of contin-
uing under the present system and of completely
barring from all participation in college games
those men who have played for money during the
summer. Whether these officials may be right or
not, or whether the Tribune and other advocates
of a change in the rules are to be upheld, is now a
moot question.
The fact remains, of course, that the rulings of
the Western Conference are at present directly op-
posed to the use in college athletics of "pro" play-
ers. It matters not that it is physically impossible
for an 'athletic association always to pick out every
man who has so used his vacation. There are un-
doubtedly many who are in the game even after the
weeding-out process has been carried on with the
greatest possible efficiency. Still the rules are in
existence, and since we cannot get around the facts,
only one thing is to be done, and that is absolutely
to follow the letter of the law.

But the point is that as yet they hold that college
men shall not participate in collegiate athletics if
they have formerly played for money. Let us
change the rules when the opportunity presents it-
self ; but until that time the only procedure possi-
ble, jf fairness is to be the dictator, is to stick by
the present intercollegiate laws and keep college
competitive circles free of the so-called "pro".
AS ANOTHER SEES US
Gilbert K. Chesterton has come to be the acceptd
thing even among those who have no aspirations to
be classed as intellectuals. There was a time when
the great Gilbert K. was eminently proper among
the intellectual dilettantes of both America and
England (how he would appreciate seeing that
combination of countries in that order), but those
days have passed. He is no longer merely a sub-
ject for polite conversation. People of all sorts
read him not because is it the thing to do but be-
cause they admire the man's cleverness, his men-
tal keenness and his superb egotism which falls just
short of that of Bernard Shaw.
The proof of his popularity is shown by the fact
that eminently practical American newspapers pay
him good money for his weekly column of obser-
vations on American life as contrasted with the
life and customs of his native England. An essay.
"On Dollars and Day Dreams" which recently ap-
peared showed a keen power of analysis and an
open-minded weighing of facts which is seldom en-
countered in semi-critical reviews of the manners
and customs of a foreign country.
Chesterton explodes the theory so prevalent on
the continent that Americans are solely interested
in money and the things that money will (10. He
has discerned the truth, so unintelligible to the aver-
age European, that the American imbues his work
with art and makes romance, under the guise of
business, a part of his everyday life instead of re-
serving it entirely for his vacations as the Eng-
lishman does.
Nevertheless, Chesterton, being English and the
product of a more leisurely, cultured society, be-
lieves that the English way is best, partly because
it satisfies his idea of the fitness of things and
partly because it gives a man an anchor to wind-
ward, in the shape of a divided interest. He points
out that no man completely loses balance so long as
part of his life remains undisturbed. Suicide, for
instance, seldom suggests itself to the business man
in England simply because he is a financial fail-
ure, whereas here failure in business frequently.
does lead people to the river.
On the whole the rising popularity of Chesterton
anng the people of America is due to the truly
remarkable ability of the man in grasping the es-
sentials of life and putting them forth in easily
comprehended terms - to that, and, we hope, to the
growing tendency of the American to interest him-
self in some things beside those purely related to
his business.
S-h-h, don't disturb the long sleep. The Okla-
homa Daily for April 13, 1921, crashes through with
the following:
JUNIORS Tod HILARIOUS
Authorities of the University of Michigan have
issued an edict forbidding the continuance of the
"J Hop", a tradition for fifty years.
This cat certainly has at least nine lives.
~. The Telescope
To the Campus Vamp
About her age she was quite frank,
As you shall soon perceive;
Since blushingly she did admit
She was a daughter of Eve.
A Grass Widow Bridge?
Both Andrews and his second bridge, Mrs. Es-
ther Tatnall Andrews, were said to be contemplat-
ing filing annulment proceedings. - April 24 is-
sue of the Detroilt Free Press.

Dear Noah:
Does trying to shave with a straight edge razor
require any special application? Harry Lypp.
No, arnica will do the business all right.
Our growing conviction that the profs are slightly
lacking in the matter of having a sense of humor
was strengthened by a little accident which befell
us in our poly sci. quiz section. The prof asked us
a certain question and being a stickler for consis,
tency we replied, "Unprepared; sir." Taking out
his little notebook he replied, "That being the case
I guess I'll have to give you a zero." With a non-
chalance that would have done credit to'a stude
waiting for an answer to his Ypsi call we replied,
"Well, that's nothing to me, sir." And what the
prof said and did then is whatconfirmed us in our
previously mentioned belief.
If as the poets say
Cleanliness is next to
Godliness
We suppose the next best
Thing to being a composer
Or a writer of hymns
Is to be a writer of
Soap ads.
We thank you.
Famous Closing Lines
"I'm feeling fit," muttered the epiletic son as he
came out of the trance.
hr f\A uTT riFTTtrT

MAIN STREET
POTTERISM

- Sinclair Lewis
- Rose Macaulay

I

-,AT-

DETROIt UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jaokson
tEastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave toi
Detroit at 6:05a.m r., 7:05 a. n..
8:10 a. mn., and hourly to 9:10 p. m_.
Liniteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. i. Ex-
pre'ses at 9:48 a. n. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locais io Itetroit-5: 55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. in. To\YpsllantI only,
11:40 p.m.. 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.mn.
Locals to Jaekson--70 a, .n.. and
12:10 p.m.
1921 APRIL 1921
S M T N T, F S
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 1 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Park~arrd St PhnnA 1782
1. A

STYLISH

WH Y

DO YOU
SUPPOSE

At Welcome Prices

TUTTLE'S

BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

IS ALWAYS
CROWDED?

Do You Need Extra Courses?

Send for catalog describing over 400 courses. in Histry., English,
Mathematics, Cheinistry,42oology, Modern Lauge, conomics,
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by correspondence. Inquire-
how credits earned may be applied on present college program.
HOME STUDY DEPT. CHICAGO. ILLINOIS

I

J. KARL MALCOLM

I

_., _ ..

THE SPIRIT OF 1921
Spells Prosperity and Progres-
sivenss. Display this spirit by
placing Your Spring Order at
once. You will then be doing
your part towards starting the
wheels of commerce.
DEPENDABLE GARME NTS

604 East Liberty Street.

I.

7E

A

k

Ready to Serve
AT ANY T~E
Open from 11 um. to 12 p.m.
Pot of hot tea and bowl of rice
PLAIN CHOP SUEY
5 CENTS
CHINESE and AMERICAN Style
Short Orders
Q zan Ttig Lo
613 LIberty st.Is

-1

RU BEY
Home-made Candies
and Box Candles
Discount on Box Candies
218 S. MAIN STREET

Dont Worry About Your
Furs or Woollens
-Use-
E N O ZI
Sold at
Drug and Prescription Store
Cor. N. Univ. and State Phone 308
G. Claude Drake, Prop.

Phone 166

I.

Summer
Oxfords

I

I

pp

Brogues
Semi-Brogues
Plain
Made for us by
Johnston & iurphy
Boyden
The latest lasts
by the best makers

A. Fact-
It makes a great difference
whether your clothes are
cleaned with Benzol or gas-
oline. May we prove Ben-
zol's superiority?

Hve it Ataster Cleaned
It costs you no, more

WAGNER &
COMPANY
STATE STREET

..a ERSPAE55E
aNiE S

Established

1848

I _ ii

11.

We call for and deliver

and

common

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