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April 26, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEATHER
Y AND COOLER
TODAY

r l 4e

4:Iai1

ASSOCIATED
PRESS

DAY ANP NZIHT 1IliI
I I ltJC

..

:XXXI. No.140.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 1921.

PRICE FIVE

a uavav- a" a r av 4sE

i

- I

0O M I L L I O N M A R
NENT, TL ATES
GERMA PSA

i

Best 17th Century Music, Promise SDfING SPOTIIHT
Of "'LeBourgeois Gentilhomme "IIIU AiJIUILIUIII rr

NEW OFFER APPROAChES MUCH
NEARER TO ALLIED
DEMANDS
FLEXIBLE ANNUITIES
ONE OF SUGGESTIONS
Note to U. S. Containing Offer Not ,
Officially Given Out; Officials
Tell of Contents
(By Associated Press)
Berlin, April 25. - The ultimate to-
tal indemnity which Germany agrees
to pay the Allies is 200,000,000 gold
marks as against 226,000,000 demanded
by the Allies in their Paris terms.

Some of the best music of the sev-
enteenth century is to be heard in
"Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme", a com-
edy ballet by Jean Baptiste Moliere,
to be presented by members of the
Cercle Francais at 8 o'clock Thursday
evening im Sarah Caswell Angell hall,
according to Jean B. Cloppet, instruct-
or in the romance language depart-
ment, director of the production. A
special orchestra under the direction
of Prof. Samuel Lockwood of the
Schol of Music has been rehearsing
MINISTRY CANDIDATES
ORGANIZE: PRESIDENT
BURTONFAORS. MOVE

regularly for the occasion.
Moliere collaborated with Lulli, the
great Italian composer, in furnishing
the music for the play Two special
songs have been written by Prof. Al-
bert A. Stanley of the .School of Mu-
sic and Prof. Charles P. Wagner of
the romance language department.
The instrumentations were made by
Mrs. Snyder of the School of Mu-
sic.
The special orchestra consists of
Mrs. Helen M. Snyder, flute; Marius
E. Fessenkemper, '23, clarinet; Bert-
rand H. Bronson, '21, first violin;
Daniel H. Sinclair, '22, second violin;
Neva M. Nelson, '21, viola; Avon
Rich, '23, violoncello; and Prof.
Charles P. Wagner, piano. The two
singers who figure in the production
are Ralph -S. Sarager of the School
of Music and Ruth Workheiser, also
of the School of Music. ,
Tickets for the production are on
sale at the bookstores, and are priced
at 50 and 75 cents and $1. Members
of the Cercle Francais are allowed 50
cents on the price of a ticket on pre-
sentation of their membership card.
STATE O0F WAR TO
EN'D SOON, HOPE
Knox Peace Resolution Reported Out
By Senate Foreign Com.
jmittee
SIMILAR ACTION PROMISEDI BY
HOUSE WITHIN SHORT TIME

1UN ULUKIUNIUHI
Chinese Skit, "Eccentric Entertain-.
ers", Music, Songs, Dancing,
Compose Performance
SPEED IS MOTTO OF SHOW
WILL LAST HOUR AND A HALF

VEASEY LECTURING
HERE ON OIL LAWS
James A. Veasey, '02L, of the Okla-
homa bar and general counsel for the
I Carter Oil company, is giving a series
of lectures on law relating to oil and
oil wells at 4:05 daily in room G of
the Law building.
Mr. Veasey has specialized in the
work that he is doing at the present
time and is considered an authority on
oil and gas laws, according to mem-
bers of the Law school. All interest-
ed are invited to attend these lec-
tures.

STATUS FIXED AT
FACULTYMEETINI.
TEACHING FORCES OF SMALLE
INSTITUTIONS MUST COMPLY
WITH RULES
HONOR SYSTEM TO BE'
PARTIALLY EXTENDEl

12 OR 15 MEN ARE ELIGIBLE
MEMBERSHIP AT
PRESENT

FOR

This is positively stated by those
close to the government, although the
German counter proposals have not
been made public here.
Simons Keeps Secrecy
Dr. Simons, the foreign secretary,
did not present the new proposals to
the Reichstag today because of an un-
derstanding with the American embas-
sy and for the additional reason that
there is a paragraph in the note to
President Harding suggesting that he
feel free to query back for further in-
formation or the elucidation of any
point not clear, if he so desires before
submitting the note, to the Entente.
Consequently the German press and
public, and even the party leaders.
have not seen the counter proposals
and their publication is eagerly
awaited.
Pledges Co-operation
-The Germans suggest making the
annuities in the payments of the rep-
aration flexible dependent upon the
recovery of German industries. An in-
ternational loan is suggested to be
floated immediately for the purpose of
placing ready cash at the disposal of
the Entente but no sum is named.
Germany expresses her willingness
to pledge the custom revenues as
guaranteed, and further offers to de-
liver manufactured articles to the Al-
lies with the understanding that Ger-
many will pay the producers and get
credit on the indemnity. Germany
also offers immediate participation in
the work of restoration of the de-
vastated areas, labor and material to
be supplied by Germany and credited
against the indemnity.
Terpsic ore and
Jazz Will Reign
A1t al Tonight

Endorsed by President Marion L.
Burton and prominent local pastors,
a club to be composed of students who
contemplate entering the ministry ef-
fected a temporary organization last
Saturday night in Lane Hall. The
meeting was one of the conferences of
Paul Heath, Princeton graduate and
student of Auburn Theological semin-
ary, who was in Ann Arbor last week
end interviewing. students who intend
entering the profession.
Permanent Organization Later
W. L. Nufer, '22, was elected tem-
porary president,'and 0. C. Michel-
mann, '22, was elected temporary sec-
retary of the new club. A committee
was also appointed to decide upon a
name and formulate a body of prin-
ciples. Permanent organization will
soon be made.
The president of the club will hold a
seat in the S. C. A. cabinet, according
to Thomas S. Evans, secretary of the
association. About 12 or 15 men are
at present eligible for membership.
It is said that the University has
always been backward in producing
ministers for the state, and it is hoped
that the new club will ,elp to place
the University where it belongs in this
respect.' The fact that there are some
3,000 ministers in the state compared
to the fact that there are some 15 pro-
spective ministers in the University
at the present time is called signific-
ant.
Plan Meets with Approval
President Marion L. Burton praised
the idea, and said, "It is an excellent
thing to keep the profession before the
men 'and women of the University."
Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas, pastor of the
First Congregational church, stated
that the need of the present is.. for
ministers with a broader training and
viewpoint, which the University sup-
plies. He favors the club, saying that
it will be of use in bringing future
ministers to the University. Rev. J.
M. Wells, of the First Baptist church,
expects that the club will present the
calling to other students.
PT EPSILON DELTA
WILL INITIATE 12

(By Associated Press)
Washington, April 25.-Progress on
the initial administration peace pol-
icy-to end the state of war by resolu-
tion of congress-was made today in
both branches of congress.
In the senate the Knox peace reso-
lution revised in minor detail, was re-
ported favorably by the foreign Mela-
tions committee, and announcement
was made by Senator Lodge, of Mas-
sachusetts, Republican leader, that it
would be called up tomorrow.
Two similar resolutions dealing sep-
arately with Germany and Austria
were introduced in the house by Chair-
man Porter of the foreign affairs com-
mittee, who announced that they would
not be taken up until the senate acts
on the Knox measure.
Although 'the senate is to begin
formal consideration tomorrow of the
Knox resolution it was not certain to-
night that actual debate would start
before Wednesday. Senator Knox, of
Pennsylvania, author of the resolu-
tion, and other Republican dleaders,
contemplated debating the measure
tomorrow but Democrats were not
ready to begin discussion.
MEETING OF ' 2 1
AT 4 TOMORROW
Swing-Out Plans, Party, Cap and
Gown Rules to be Discussed

Five snappy acts and an overture by
the Union orchestra is the bill that
the Union will offer in the Spring
Spotlight at 8 o'clock tonight in Hill
auditorium. Speed is to be the motto
of the production and the management
expects that the entire show will be
run off in an hour and a half. The acts
have been arranged to facilitate cut-
ting down the intermissions and a per-
formance unbroken by delays is prom-
ised. .
Character Songs First
Robert McCandless, '21M, will open
the show with his character songs,
"Fuzzy-Wuzzy"and "A Chip Off the Old
Block". The other acts include a hu-
morous Chinese skit of the Ming
period, "The Watermelon Thief", play-
ed by Charles Kuhn, '22, and Carl
Guske, '22; a. few renditions, among
which will be hits from the recent
opera, by the mandolin sextette; the;
trio of "Eccentric Entertainers de
luxe", John Cunningham, '23E, Henry
Morton, '23E, and George Schemm, '23;
and a quartette coiposed of Kemp
Keena, School of Music, Thomas Un-
derwood, '21, Paul Wilson, '23L, and,
Albert Schirmer, '22E.
Quartette a Favorite
The quartette is an old time favor-
ite in Ann Arbor and has appeared,
in many productions. This will be its;
first appearance for some time and it
is expected to prove a popular re-
vival.
One other act was announced pre-
viously by the management, "Pitter-
Patter", by Gorge Sloan, but ineli-
gibility has cut this skit from the pro-
gram. R
The entire show was rehearsed last
evening and indications point to a pro-
duction up to the usual Union stand-
ard, according to E. Mortimer Shuter,,
director of thd vaudeville.'
"Vill End Before Ball Starts x
The doors of the auditorium will be
opened at 7:30 o'clock tonight and the.
first 'act will commence at 8 o'clock.
It is announced that the performance
will be over in time for the Red Crosst
ball.'
TAH BETA P1 INITIATES
S. W. Traylor, '21E, Toastmaster of
Evening; Dean Cooley Speaks
S. W. Traylor, '21E, acted as toast-
master at the Tau Beta Pi initiationE
held last Saturday night in the Union.-
L. A. Gaines, '21E, gave the addresst
of welcome and A. L. May, '22E, re-1
plied.
Dean M. E. Cooley gave a short talk.
The names of the 20 initiates weret
printed in a previous issue of Thef
Daily.I
WA RNING ISSUED TO '24 MEN
ABOUT WEARING HEADGEAR

SIC1A9 CAMPAIGN FOR
MORAL.AND FINANCIL
SUPPORTSUCEEDIN
I. . -
MANY PERMANENT CO)MITTEES
FORMED IN VARIOUS
CITIES
Campaigning by officials of the Stu-
dent Christian association to gain
moral and financial support for that,
Qrganization from alumni of the Uni-
versity has so far been successful,
according to Thomas S. Evans, secre-
tary.
Mr. Evans, H. R. Chapman, Method-
ist student pastor, Rev. Lloyd Wallick,
Lutheran student pastor, and Louis
Reimann, '16, director of the extension
service of the S. C. A., have been en-
gaged in the work.
Fund Soliciting Incidental
Detroit, Grand Rapids, Lansing, Kal-
amazoo, Chicsgo, Toledo, Philadelphia
and New York City have been visited,
and in most of these cities permanent
committees. have been formed. Solic-
iting for funds has so far been car-
ried on only incidentally with this
work.
According to the S. C. A. officials
the alumMii are much interested in the'
S. C. A. plan of co-ordinating the relig-
ious activities of the University. What
is wanted is a united religious front.
The alumni are not interested in sep-
arate denominatiofal endeavor and
are opposed to duplication of effort.
Alumni Favor Student Control
Student control of their religious
organizations in connection with the
various local churches is favored by
alumni, who also want loc9l churches1
to be provided with the best possible
facilities for religious work. Co-op-
eration between local churches for the
benefit of the students will bring finan-
cial aid, according to the officials.
SENIOR LIT DUES PAYABLE
NOW IN UNIVERSITY HALL
All members of the senior literary.
class must pay their dues ($3.50) be-
fore Saturday, May 14, the day set for
the senior lit dance. Dues may be
paid from 2 to 4 o'clock on any after-
noon this week at the booth in Uni-
versity hall. Money must be had so
that arrangements can be made for a
fitting memorial of the class to the
University.

Advanced Schools Will Be Inspected
Evlery Two Years to Insure
Proper Equipment
Standards of admission from junior
colleges in the state to the Univer-
sity, together with required standing
of the colleges in respect to equip-
ment, curriculum, faculty, rules for
the transfer of credits, and inspection
were determined by the faculty of the
literary college at a meeting yester-
day afternoon in Natural Science aud-
itorium.
The faculty; after a thorough dis-
cu'ssion, adopted the recommendations
of the junior college committee, con-
sisting of Prof. C. H. Van Tyne, of the
history department, Prof. J. G. Winter,
of the Greek and Latin department,
and Prof. W. H. Hobby, of the geology
department.
Colleges Must Comply
According to the plan adopted by
the University faculty, students in
schools offering college courses desig-
nated as junior colleges, may earn
credits which shall entitle them to
enter the University with advanced
standing provided the aforesaid junior
colleges comply with the regulations
formulated by the University. Two
types of schools are contemplated in
this plan, the junior colleges in city
public schools and the small colleges.
preferably those which have accepted
'the status of the junior college.
Under the new system the teaching
force of the junior colleges recogniz-
ed by the University must possess the
qualifications demanded of its in-
structors by the University. The teach-
ers must be specialists hr their sub-
jects. All instructors will be requir-
ed to have had two years' experience
as teachers in a high school or col-
lege. Teachers will be limited in the
amount of teaching which they may
do in' junior colleges in order that
they may have leisure for study and
development.
Libraries Must Bfe Approved
The libraries and laboratories avail-
able for the departments offering jun-
ior college instruction must be kept
up to a high standard which shall be
approved by the University committee
of inspection.
Graduates of a junior college on, the
approved list may, on the presenta-
tion of a certificate to that effect, be
admitted by the dean .of the literary
college to the University.
A committee of three members from
the literary faculty will visit junior
colleges in order either to recommend
or reject the application of the 1col-
(Continued on Page Eight)

Jazz music and terpsichore will vie
for chief honors tonight at the first
annual Red Cross ball, which will be
held in Barbour and Waterman gym-
nasiums. When the clock strikes
eigiht, Fisher's galaxy of music-making
artists will start the first number of
the lengthy dance program, playing
until midnight.
University restrictions for social
functions have been set aside for this
affair, with the purpose in view of per-
mitting students to attend. The dance,
however, will be informal, and it is
requested by .the committee in charge
that noflowers be worn.
Reports from the ticket sales indi-
cate a large attendance both here and
at 'Ypsilanti, where the Red Cross is
conducting a similar affair at the State
Normal college gymnasium. Tickets,.
which may be secured any time today
at local book stores, the Cadillac gar-
age. or the Ann Arbor Savings bank,
will be accepted eitler at Ann Arbor
or Ypsilanti.

Twelve charter members of Pi Ep-
silon Dqlta, honorary dramatic fra-
ternity, will be initiated Wednesday
evening in the Union. The initiation
will be conducted by Artur L. McCaf-
fery, '23, who has been initiated be-
fore this time.
Members of this fraternity are all
studts who have taken part in cam-
pus dramatics or have written or pro-
duced plays.
U. of W. Defeats R. 0. T. C. Rifle Team
Scoring 923 points out of a possible
1,000 the R. 0. T. C. rifle team of the
University of Wisconsin defeated thel
R. 0. T. C. rifle team of this Univer-
sity in'a contest held Saturday, April
23. Michigan made a score of 899.

Swing-out plans will be discussed
by the senior lits at a meeting at 4
o'clock tomorrow afternoon in room
205, Mason hall. Arrangements must
bea made regarding the line of march
for the fourth year celebration in ad-
dition to other matters.
The class will also decide what days
will be designated for wearing the
cap and gown after the Swing-out
ceremony, and will discuss the in-
formal class party which has been
scheiuled for Saturday afternoon, May
14, in Barbour gymnasium.
The invitation committee requests
that all seniors who have not ordered
invitations do so at once at the booth
in University hall which is to be open
from 2 to 4 o'clock each afternoon this
week.

Warning was issued yesterday by
the Committee bn Underclass Conduct
that freshmen who are seen without
their class headgear will be subject
to discipline. Warm weather will be
no excuse for going without pots or
toques.
It was also announced that the reg-
ular meeting of the committee will be
held. at 7:15 o'clock tomorrow night
in the Union, instead of tonight, the
usual time.
Registrar Hall on Tour of Inspection
Registrar Arthur G. Hall, of the lit-
erary college, left last night on a tour
of ins'pection of the high schools of
Algonac, Richmond, Armada, and
Memphis.,

Student Advisory Committee Gets
auto Action In Remedying Lvils

Regular functions as a judicial body
overseeing student conduct were as-
sumed by the Student Advisory com-
mittee at a special meeting yesterday
afternoon in the Union. A number of
matters were discussed upon which
no definite action has been taken, ac-
cording to James I. McClintock, '21L,
chairman, but some steps have been
taken to remedy undesirable condi-
tions among the student body.
The committee is now working on,
a co-operative plan to eliminate the
bad sportsmanship that was exhibit-
ed by a number of Michigan rooters
during the past basketball season.1

Communications were addressed to
honor societies and several others
whose support could be expected, sug-
gesting the formation of some plan
whereby students themselves in the
stands could prevent the recurrence
of such. sentiment.
Steps were also taken to stop the
intoxication and misconduct that have
been seen at the Swing-out in past
years by communicating with presi-
dents of the graduating classes. It is
hoped that in this way personal con-
tact with the students will prevent the
misbehavior that has frequently mar-
red the occasion.

_

_: _ .
.

Spring

Tickets at Bookstores
and Cushing's
60c

Tickets at Bookstores

SPOTLIGHT

VAUDEVILLE

and Cushing's

TONIGHT
HILL AUDITORIUM

50 c

DOORS OPEN
AT 7:30

SHOW STARTS

AT 3:00

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