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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 23, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
1111M111111-7 7711

r4t Mtr4igatt rtel
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Publisked every morning except Monday during the Univer-
year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
ublication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
dited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
is matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.so.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications notto exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
:re not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
th. and notices of events will be publisbed in The Daily at the
cretion of the Editor, if left at or maled to The Da lyoffice..
signed communications will receive no consideration. No man-
ript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
;seed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
WAGING EDITOR ...........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
w Edit r ..............................Chesser M. Camobelt
irman lditorial Board.......................Lee Woodruff
lit Editors-
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
J. I. Dakin 3. E. M'vcManis
Ienaud Sherwood T. W. Saret, Jr.
day Editor .......... ........- - A. Bernstein
,Editor.......... ............B. P. Campbell
orials.......'......T. J. Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. Beach
rts ....................................Robert Angell
men'i Editor................ . .........Mary D. Lane
grap ............ ............Thomas Dewey
Mcope .. ................ ....... i.... .Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Thine Waldo Frank H. McPike Sidney B. Coates
TinG. Weber 3. A. Bacon C. T. Pentioyer
abeth Vickery . W. Ottaway Marion B. Stahl
E. Clark Paul Watzel Lowell S. Kerr
rge Reindel Byron Darnton Marion Koch
-ry B. Grundy Mv. A. Klaver Dorothy Whipple
ices Oberhotzer E. R. Meiss Gerald P. Overton
e E. Adams Walter Donnelly Edward Lambrecht
lace F. Elliott Beata Hasler Sara Waller
hston McBain Kathrine Montgomery H. E. Howlett
BUSINOSS STAFF
Telephone 960

NESS MANAGER..........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
tising.............................D. . P. Joyce
ieds.. ... ........................... Kunstadter
ation ...................... ...- ...F. M. Heath
ts ..........................................E. R. Priehs
ation ... ...................... ......V. P. Hillery
Assistants
W. Lambrecht M. M. Moule H. C. Hunt
Hamel, Jr.. N. W. 'Rolxrtson M. S. Goldring
I. Hutchinson Thos: L. Rice H. W. Heidbreder5
A. Cross R. G. Burchell W. Cooley
t. L. Davis A. J. Parker

carrying on the impetus which that war afforded
towards the perfection of the science of aviation.
The appropriation set aside by Secretary Weeks
of more than two millions of dollars for the pur-
pose of air development has met with the approval
and encouragement of the press which voices the
anxiety of the American people lest we be outdis-
tanced by our European neighbors in a field which
has such potentialities in peace as well as in war.
It would indeed be regrettable should the nation
which gave the heavier-than-air machine to the
world continue to resign the development and 'ben-
efits of that invention to other countries. Amrican
ingenuity and inventive genius have proved them-
selves in so many directions that their energies if
turned towards the sky, would in all probability
achieve a success paralleling or surpassing that of
other great powers.
But to accomplish such a program, money is
needed, money in much more liberal sulms than has
recently been granted. Let us hope that the action
of Secretary Weeks is the initial urge of an ardent
future activity in this field.
LIBRARY READING LISTS
To those students who are desirous of improving
their knowledge of literature by the route of gen-
eral reading and vet to whom the method of select-
ing proper material is a rater vague problem, the
lists posted this year on the bulletin board of the
general library should have proved a boon. "Thirty-
six books called worth while", compiled by the
New York Public library, lists of short stories, of
plays, and of works of a more serious or sometimes
lighter nature, have been placed before us from
time to time, and the officials are to be commended
for their thoughtfulness.
It is to be feared, however, that these posted com-
pilations are often overlooked in our hurry to and
from the reading room. Accordingly, the sugges-
tion has presented itself that, from a literary stand-
point, the students might be served even more ef-
fectually if printed lists of books, books which com-
bine interest with real literary worth, were to be
placed on sale at cost for the benefit of those who
realize and appreciate their own need for guidance
in the matter of choosing the right kind of reading
matter.
The preparation of such pamphlets should not
present much difficulty to the library; yet as a guide
for the serious-minded reader, such booklets would
no doubt prove of inestimable worth in helping him
to select, for his own consumption, the highest type
of interesting literature which the stacks afford.
The furnishing of photographs of candidates
along with the ballots in campus elections should
sometimes be of help to those voters whose memory
for names is short; yet even a moderately good im-
agination should have little difficulty in guessing
what was running through the minds of the throngs
- of female voters who, while sizing up the like-
nesses of their sister students, succeeded in thor-
oughly blockading the traffic yesterday in the cor-
ridor of University hall
T"he Telescoe e
No, Clarice, you're wrong when you say that your
escort sings first base on the ball team.
Dear Noah:
The other day I saw a heavily loaded truck driv-
ing up State street in broad daylight with two
lighted lanterns attached to the rear of the truck.
What do you suppose the reason for this was?
B. K. L.
I don't know, unless it be that the driver was try-
ing to lighten the load.

MAIN STREET

Sinclair Lewis

POTTERISM

- Rose Macaulay

m-AT-

G RATFHAM
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson !
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,1
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.1
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:'48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. mn.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.,
and every two hours to 9:00 p. n.,
also 11:00 p. M. To Ypsilanti only.
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 .m., and
12:10 p.m.

What's in a Name
ever try TUTTLE'S
when you wanted a
nice lunch?
Conveniently located just one-
half block south of the "Maj"

SUGARBOWL
HOME MADE CANDY
ABSOLUTELY CLEAN
BEST LINE IN THE CITY
EVERYTHING
MADE IN ANN ARBOR
[rIUT LUNCHES
ANN ARBOR
SUGAR BOWL

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b

.,.

persons wishing to secure informationconcerning news for any
Isue of The Daily should roe the night editor, who has full charge
. a news to be printed that night. _________.._ .._
SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 1921.
Night Editor-R. E. ADAMS, JR.
MICHIGAN SPIRIT NEXT YEAR
This is the first of a Wednesday-and-Saturday
series of editorials aiming to get the campus started
right next fall. The letdown in spirit has been all
top obvious this year: in the poor attendance at
class meetings, the occasional hissing and catcalling
at games, the failure to observe traditions, the ten-
dency to cry a cynical "fie!" at all that would make
the individual forget himself in the interest pre-
sering and adding to that energetic loyalty which
should distinguish Michigan's undergraduate body.
Let's get started now on a new era.
i. TmE INDIVIDUAL
Michigan is honored by the presence of many
types of students,. and afflicted by two: the cynic
and the drone.
The campus cynic is the child graybeard who has,
in his own estimate, seen all things, measured their
value by experience, and judged them universally
useless. He enjoys seeing the damned fools work-
ing to get out inane publications, attending senseless
gatherings, yelling their lungs out, obeying tradi-
tions. He watches his benighted fellows with the
same superciliously amused complacency with which
the average mortal would follow the antics of a
cage of monkeys. Everything is unnecessary, in his
eyes, except what he himself is doing.
The cynic would be an interesting exhibit to keep,
if we could only embalm him in a museum. But
he is always tearing loose and throwing sand in the
motor. He is the senior who is eternally laughing
or sneering at the freshmen in his rooming house
whO are trying to live up to traditions or get out
for activities. He is the "experienced man" who
persists in pointing out the amateurish, nature of
campus drama and journalism; who joins a so-
ciety, - accepts the responsibilities of membership,
and then conveniently forgets them on meeting
nights, passing on with biting irony his opinion of
the workers. He is the campus' worst pest and par-
e site.
The drone is not so bad. At least he is not so
crude as to refuse credit to others. He is simply
a let-George-do-it de luxe, a consistent passer of
the buck. He is glad somebody will work; he ad-
mits things ought to be done; but he always chooses
to be a bystander. He wouldn't matter if there were
only one of him. But figures prove he is the major-
ity. He is the athlete who doesn't come out, the
artist who doesn't draw, the studious avoider of
campus ballots.
Michigan spirit starts with the individual's atti-
tude. The cynic needs worst to have somebody
laugh at him, hard and heartily; the drone ought
to have a good dose of tonic from a friend who is
expert in the noble art of razz. Above all, next
year's freshmen must be taught to take neither the
drone nor the cynic seriously.
MORE AVIATION ACTIVITY.
The early awakening of the present administra-
tion at Washington to the necessity of an efficient
aviation force, both on land and sea, is a source of
great relief to those who since the close of a war
in which flying showed its immense possibilities,
have viewed with increasing impatience and dis-
appointment the lethargy of the United States in

1921 APRIL 1921
S. M, T W T F S
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 1R8 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792
WOULDN'T YOU JUMP OUT
OF YOUR SHOES
If you suddenly remembered
That that fire insurance policy
On your home and
All your family idols
Had expired last Friday
And had not been renewed?
SURE YOU WOULD!
And you-ought to.
Then,
When you land,
You should start running
Till you reached a telephone

()J ue Agrtk"

NO ADVANCE
IN PRICES
TUESDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

1

MAURICE. TOURNEUR-
presen Se
THE LAST OF THE
MOHICANS
]Jnlmerican dratmaeternal-by JameslFenimore ooper
Directed by
MAURICE TOURNEUR and CLARENCE LIIROWN
The story of a prince without
a kingdom4

11

And called

BUTLER

INSURANCE
209 NATIONAL BANK BUILDING.

About the most popular
Elective on this campus is
Gum -

;. .. ,;

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P R UNER'S

You know, you don't have to
Take it
Unless you chews.
We thank you.
All Tha.t's Necessary
First sweet thing-Don't you think Joe is a de-
lightful person to talk to?
Second ditto-What do you mean, he's dumb,
isn't he?
First-Yes, dear, but not deaf.
(With Apologies to The Guillotine)
The shades of night were falling fast,
As through the Arcade walk I passed,
I slipped upon that walk of glass -
The words I uttered could scarcely pass.
Excelsior.
I went into a lunch room near,
Thinking that food would bring me cheer.
I ordered milk and shredded wheat,
But alas, I could not eat
Excelsior..

BUY NOW

Exclusive

I

Shirts
A recent
purchase
made in
New York

From all indications coal will be no cheaper this year than at
present, and even should there be a decrease in freight rates, the ad-
vance that will follow in coal prices will off-set the decrease in
freight. We respectfully solicit your valued inquiries, and guarantee
our prices are right.
THE PRUNER COAL CO., INC.
OFFICE: 124 EAST HURON
Office Phone:.19:10-F1 Yard Phone: 1950-F2

-1

Beautiful
Japanese crepes,
colored oxfords,
fancy cords.
With and without
collars.

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I homeward plied my weary way,
To seek oblivion in the hay,
To sink my woes in slumber deep -
The mattress wouldn't let me sleep.
Excelsior.

WAGNER &
COMPANY
STATE STREET

SPRING PERSONNEL
TOMMY THOMAS'
ALL - PROFESSIONAL ORCHESTRA
L. MATHEWS........................VIOLIN
B. E. HYDE.........................XYLOPHONE
F. OAKES ................................PIANO
H. SHIELDS ........................SAXOPHONE
H. GLADY .................................BANJO
F. B. THOMAS.....DRUMS, XLYOPHONE, CORNET
CALL HAMEL
1351 WASHTENAW AVENUE PHONE 2738

Established 1848

11

Famous Closing Lines
"A literary taste," he muttered as
goat eating the editor's paste.

he saw the

If

NOAH COUNT.

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