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April 23, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-23

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY AND COOLER
TODAY

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ASSOCIAT:
PRESS
DAY AN11 NIOIT
SERVICE

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VOL., XXXI.No. 13'8. *,-.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 1921.

PRI(,CE I jVEJ1 CEPI

.::

Ui NION TO MAK
WO RKSHOPIT
SMALL THEATRE'
CONSTRUCTION TO COM ENCE
WITH END OF LABOR
TROUBLES
POND AND POND DRAW
REMODELING PLANS
New Little Theater Will Have Stage,
Orchestra Pit, and Dressing
Rooms
Plans for remodeling, the Union
workshop so as to make it a theater
as well as a workshop, have been
drawn by Pond and Pond of Chicago,
architects of the Union, and accepted
by Union officials. Construction work
Kwill begin as soon as the labor trou-
bles here become settled, the prevail-
in opinion being that the work will
be under way by June 1. The theater
is to be complete by the time of the
opening of college in the fall.
Contracts Awarded
Contracts have been 'awarded to the
Dahl-Stedman Construction company
fof Chicago, the same company which
erected the Union building. Mr. Hos-
kins, their representative who directed
the construction of the Union, will be
in charge of the remodeling work on
the workshop.
The board of directors and board of
governors of the Union voted funds,
which with the profit secured by the
extra performance of the opera last
Monday night in Detroit, will finance
the construction work that will give
to men students of the University a
little theater of their own.
Regulation Stage
A modern stage fully as wide as
that of the Whitney theater and- of
greater depth will be built in the
south eAd of the building after the
removal of a partition. The roof will
be partially removed to permit the
construction of a large loft to take
care of the scenery. A paint frame
which is to operate vertically, the
same as the scenery, will give opera
scenery builders better working fa-
cilities. Heretofore Carl Bromel
painted the opera scenery by laying
it out flat on the floor.
Dressing rooms with the latest con-
veniences will be built in the base-
ment under the stage. The orchestra
pit is to be amply large enough to ac-
commiodate 30 pieces.-
Mr. Shuter's Idea
The workshop idea originated with
Mr. Shuter last fall when he organ-
ized classes in stage dancing, stage-
craft, play production, play writing,
'and acting. More than 50 men were
enrolled in .the dancing courses and
30 in the other courses. "One of the
great helps which made the opera a
success this year was because many
of the cast and chorus learned stage
terms, grew as the opera grew, and
didn't- 'shy' when the show was pro-
duced."
Policies will be followed next yer
in the new workshop-theater the same
as this year. Mr. Shuter will hold
his classes there again next fall, and
the opera scenery will be built ther
as usual. Operas, spotlights and oth-
er entertainments will be rehearsed
there, and the men will receive pract
tically all their training in the build-
ing.

RED CROSS BALL
SET FOR TUESDAY
The first annual Red Cross ball will
be held Tuesday evening, April 26, in
Barbour and Waterman gymnasiums.
The ball will be informal. No flowers
will be worn. Music will be furnish-
ed by Fisher's "Kalamazoo" orches-
tra. Proceeds will be turned over to
the Red Cross fund.
All restrictions have been waived
by Dean Joseph A. Bursley and Dean
Myra B. Jordan so that it will be pos-,
sible for students to go to the dance.
The same tickets will be good for ad-
mittance to the Red Cross dance to be
held at the same time in the Normal
gymnasium at Ypsilanti. Tickets will
be $3, n'o war tax, a'nd will be on sale
at Quarry's, Graham's, the Cadillac
garage, Rash's grocery and the Ann
Arbor Savings bank;
MIUSICA-L CLUBS TO
TRHIP -IN M MA
Glee and Mandolin Men Will Play in
Three or Four Cities After
Spring Concert
SPECIALTY ACTS AND FEATURES.
WILL INTERSPERSE PROGRAMj

WOMENVOTEI IN.
ANNUAL ELECTION
Helen Bishop Is President' of Athletic
Association; Gertrude Boggs
Leads Y. "W. C. A.
EDNA GROFF CHOSEN TO HEAD
WOMEN'S LEAGUE NEXT YEAR

H. H. Jfencken Holds Court; Hurls
Epithets At Prof. Rankin 's Book

H. L. Mencken,

co-editor with

use of the word "pertain."

He de-

In the women's campus election yes-9
terday, Edna Groff, '22, was elected1
president of the Women's league, Hel-
en Bishop, '22, was chosen presidentj
of the Women's Athletic association,
and Gertrude Boggs, '22, was elected
president of the Y. W. C. A., all for
next year.
Other Women's league results were:
vice-president, Joyce McCurdy, '22;
treasurer, Frances Ames, '23; corre-
sponding secretary, Theodosia Bur-
ton, '23; recording secretary, Kather-
in Kuhlman, '23; senior representa-
tive, Carol; McDonald, '22; junior -rep-
resentative, Lau'ra Mills, '23, and Lou-
ise Graham, '23; sophomore represen-
tative, Catherine Stafford, '24,.
Marion Koch, '23, was elected vice-
president of the Women's Athletic as-
sociation; Elizabeth Carson, '24, sec-
retary; Frances Weimer, '22, treasur-
er; senior representative, Doris
Sprague, '22; junior representative,
Grace Fry, '23; sophomore representa-
tive, Marion Taylor, '24.
Ruth Goodhue, '22, was chosen vice-
president of the Y. W. C. A.; Cather-
ine Greenough, '24, secretary; Helen
Aubrey, '23, treasurer. The results of
the elections for the board of trustees
of the Y. W. C. A. will not be an-
nounced until after the menehave vot-
ed also on the nominees.
PHI SIGMA ELECTS 10
. MEN TO MEMBERSHIP

George Jean Nathan of the Smart Set,
literary critic, author, and contributor
to magazines, has undertaken a new
venture, and in the May issue of his
publication we find him wearing a
new toga-that of imperial judge of
lexicography, typogoaphy, and rhe-
toric.
At the last sitting of his court, he
issued a decree denouncing in its en-
tirety the book, "American Writers of
the Present Day, 1890 to 1920," writ-
ten by Prof. T. E. Rankin, of the rhe-
toric department.
Mencken Caustic
Mencken, stern, severe, and if a lay-
man may be pardoned the intrusion,
cynical, commences his fault-finding
with the first page of the book, where-
in he differs with the author on the
WORK STARTED ON
Necessary Excavation Now Completed
and Carpenter Work Will
Begin Soon
SHIPMENT OF 200,000 FEET
LUMBER RECEIVED HERE

votes three paragraphs to a discussion
of suitable synonyms-how proud that
little word must be! Then he con-
tinues to pick at random, and selects
several other words for which he of-
fers more choice substitutes, with the!
aid of the Standard dictionary.
Next Mencken turns his attention
to the author's collection of American
writers, summing it all up as "a per-
fect specimen of the depths of banality
to which the teaching of 'English' has
descended in some of our public sem-
inaries."
Sorry for "Yokels"
In the interests of justice, the judge,
in presenting the case to the jury-
probably the host of Smart Set sub-
scribers-declares that he does not
-"expose it to the gaze of the nobility
simply to poke fun at a poor college
professor... ..What interests me is
the effect upon the poor yokels who
strive heroically for a 'liberal' educa-
tion at such universities as Michigan,'
and are then belabored and stupified
with such balderdash. .. . Think of
raising chickens and milking cows for
20 years to pay for such an educa-
tion." So ends the trial.
Professor Rankin's only comment
bn the matter was that it was "a
characteristic outburst on the part of
Mr. Mencken.",

MANDATEQUESTIOF
STILL UNCHANl
DIPLOMATIC ADVISORY COUNC1
APPROVES ACTION OF
CABINET
DIPLOMATS HOPF FOR
'PEACEFUL SETTLEMEN
Report Says Cabinet Decided The
Was no Reason to Alter
Present Policy
(By Associated Press)
Tokio, April 22. - The diplomat
advisory council today approved t
attitude of the cabinet on the manda
question, after Viscount Uchida, t
foreign minister, had given an exp
sition of the government's viewpoir
according to newspaper reports. Not
ing official as to the nature of t
council's decision has been given or
In diplomatic circles the impressi
prevails that every effort will
made to reach a settlement satisfa
tory to the powers concerned. T
government, according to the Asa
Shimpm, is considering the advisab
ity of appointing a special comm
sion with this end in. view.
A Tokio dispatch of Wednesd
quoted the Nichi Nichi as saying t
cabinet on Tuesday had decided the
was no reason to alter Japan's p
icy on the Yap mandate question I
cause of the recent American note
the subject. The decision of the ca
inet would be reported Friday to t
diplomatic advisory council at an e
traordinary meeting of that bo
While the foreign office would neitb
confirm or deny the Nichi statem(
the Tokio newspapers of Thursday
cepted it as accurate.

A trip to three or fourtMid-Western
cities will be taken by the Glee and.
Mandolin clubs after their spring con-
cert and vaudeville entertainment
which will be given in Hill auditor-
ium the second week in May. Chicago,
Grand Rapids, South'Bend, Flint, De-
troit, Toledo, and a number of Michi-
gan cities have been proposed to be
visited by the clubs. Final action,
however, has not yet been taken on the
exact itinerary of the trip.
Vaudeville features and specialty
acts will be interspersed in the musi-
cal. program, which is to be absolutely
different from anything that the clubs
have ever given. The .personnel of
both clubs is now complete. Prof. Wil-
liam Wheeler is directing the Glee
club, and Prof. Frank L. Thomas the
Mandolin club, each organization now
regularly rehearsing twice a week.
Plans Progress;
Band Bounce To
Have Six Acts

INITIATION BANQUET WILL
HELD TUESDAY NIGHT AT.
UNION

BE

Work on the new Ferry field east
stands, which are to be of a portable
nature so that they may be used for
both football and baseball, has begun.
Two hundred thousand feet of lum-
ber, a little more than half the re-
quired amount for the new stands, has
arrived and all the necessary exca-
vating has been done. Within a few
days the carpenter work will begin.
To Speed Work
"We are using every effort to speed
the work so that at least one section
of the stand will be ready for part of
the baseball season," said Prof. James
H. Cissell, of the engineering college,
who is in charge of the building ar-
rangements. "Some of the essential
lumber has been delayed in arriving,,
but as soon as it comes we will have
from 20 to 25 men working on the
stands daily," he said.
To Paint All Grey
It was at first expected to have the
stands finished in June, but the delay
will probably retard the work to some
extent, though it is assured that the
stands will be complete by the middle
of summer.
Besidesrthe erection of the new
stands, the north stands will be en-
tirely repainted - this time a grey
to match the concrete ones. The new'
east stands will also be of the same
color.

Arrangements for the annual Spring,
Band Bounce, to be held May 5, are
well under way, according to Seth R.°
Bidwell, '23, manager of the Varsity
band.
Tryouts are appearing before the
committee this week and of the 30 or
more acts competing, the best six en-
tertainers will be chosen to appear on
the program. A comedy skit has al-
ready been chosen, which is said to be
one of the best efforts of that kind
ever presented in Ann Arbor.
Another act will feature several old
favorites in a soft shoe dance. The
proceeds will be used to defray the
expenses of the band on its annual
spring concert trip.
CHAMPION TYPIST WILL GIVE
DEMONSTRATION MONDAY

BOOKS FOR, NEXT YEAR1,'S
UNION OPERA DUE JUNEl
SHUTER WISHES TO INTERVIEW
PROSPECTIVE OPERA
WRITERS.l
Books for next year's Union operal
must be in by June 1, according to E.

Ten men have been elected to mem-
bership in the Michigan chapter of
the Phi Sigma society, national hon-
orary biology fraternity. The initia-
tion banquet will be held next Tues-
day evening, April 26, at the Union.
Prof. Max M. Peet, of the Medical
school, will address the members.
Membership in the Phi Sigma frater-
nity requires that the candidate pass
at least 16 hours of work in biology
with an average grade of B or above
and must display an unusual interest
in the subject.
The following men were elected to
membership: Active members-The-
odore I. Bauer, '23M, George H. Be-
lote, '23M, Garry W. Hann, grad., Joa-
quin M. Maranon, grad., Max S. Mar-
shall, grad., and Leonard R. Wagoner,
21E; faculty members-Prof. Freder-
ick A. Coller, surgery; Prof. Herbert
W. Emerson, hygiene; Prof. Philip B.
Hadley,rbacteriology; and Prof. Clar-
ence Medder, general linguistics.

Mortimer Shuter, director. The large
amount of revising which must be
done before the matter is in suitable
form for presentation makes it imper-
ative that the work be in at an early
date. The book and a number of the
lyrics for "Top o' th' Mornin'" were
in early last spring.
Only one book for the 1922 opera.
has been turned in to date, and Mr.
Shuter is anxious that a number more
be received so as to afford a choice.
He can be seen at the Union where
he will talk the matter over with
those who wish to write.
ATHLETIC' BOOKS NEEDED
TO ENTERFERRY FIELD

As a place for entertainment, it willi
serye as a meeting place when musical
skits or other forms of. entertainmentj
are proposed for small audiences. The
details of the operatiop of the new in-;
stitution will be worked out later.
TICKETS FR CERCLE FRANCAIS
PLAY TO GO ON SALE TODAY,
Tickets for the play of the Cercle
Francais, "Le Bourgeois Gentilhom-
me," to be presented Thursday, April
28, in Sarah Caswell Angell hall, go
on sale today at the State street book-
stores. The prices are 50, 75 cents,
and $1. Those holding associate nem-
berships in the Cercle Francais will
be admitted, or can pay the extra
price and get reserved seats for 75
cents or $1.
Many reservations have been receiv-
ed from out of town, so those who wish
to be sure of having seats should make
their reservations immediately at the
bookstores or the office of Prof. A. G.

STRIKERS ST UILL DELI

Mr. George L. Hossfield, winner of
the International Championship Type-
writing contest in New York city last
October, will give a demonstration of
his skill, speed, and accuracy at 1
o'clock Monday afternoon,. April 25,
in Lane hall.
In the winning contest Mr. Hoss-
field wrote at the rate of 131 words
per minute, net, for one hour. He al-
so won the one minute championship
with a speed of 144 words per min-
ute.
Mr. Hossfield will be at the School
of Shorthand between 2 and 3 o'clock
Monday afternoon for consultation.
Prof. Wood Speaks at Olivet College
Prof. A. E. Wood, of the sociology
department, addressed a gathering
yesterday afternoon at Olivet college
on the subject, "The Attack on Pov-
erty". The lecture was given under
the auspices of the University Exten-
sion service.
R. 0. T. C. Rifle Meet Today
An indoor meet between the R. O.
T. C. rifle teams of the University of
Wisconsin is scheduled for this morn-'
ing. The teams will each fire in their
own galleries and the results will be
wired to each school.

First '23 Booklet
Comes Out T oday
"Sophs! ", the official publication of
the 1923 lit class, will make its ap-
pearance for the first time toda§. Cop-
ies will be mailed free of charge to
every member of the class today and
Monday. Members of other classes
will have an opportunity to secure
copied early next week.
A class book is new to Michigan.
The purpose of the issue is said to be
to help unify the class and to induce
'23 men to go out for campus activi-
ties. The book is decorated with a
two-color cover by Elmer G. Wellin,
'23, depicting a soph and a freshman
in a characteristic attitude.
Features of the book include an ar-
ticle by President Marion L. Burton,
a dissertation on the Soph prom and
the vague J-Hop, an exposition deal-
ing with spring games, and "Don'ts"
for freshmen. A list of all sopho-
mores in campus activities is also
given.
The staff of the book is composed
of the following members of' the
class: Edward Y. Lambrecht, Nor-
man PJ Damon, Leo J. Hershdorfer,
Paul G. Watzel, Thomas E. Dewey, By-
ron Darnton, Marion B. Stahl, and
Hughston M. McBain.

rractice begins
In, Earnest For
Spotlight Skits
Spring Spotlight skits were rehears-
ed yesterday afternoon under the su-
pervision of E. Mortimer Shuter, di-
rector of the production, and a prac-
tice program has been laid out for to-
day, Monday, and Tuesday which will
put the show on a par with the previ-
ous vaudeville presentations of the
Union.
The mandolin sextette has arrang-
ed a novelty program for its act which
is said to be a variation from any-
thing that has been presented in Ann
Arbor for some time. The ,sextette
carries three mandolins, two harp gui-
tars, and one mandola, and will play
"Fairy Fountain" from this year's
opera, in addition to popular and old-
time songs.
A shift has taken place in the other
acts as announced yesterday and the

"Every person entering Ferry field
on days when Varsity baseball games
are scheduled will have to present
their athletic book," said Harry Tillot-
son, assistant director of outdoor ath-
letics, yesterday. "We wish to em-
phasize the fact that this does not ex-
clude tennis players, track men, foot-
ball men, or those taking part in in-
ter-fraternity games of any kind.
Every person, regardless of their pur-
pose on the field, must present their
book."
Athletic book coupon No. 10 will be
collected today at the Michigan-Pur-
due game. The game is scheduled to
start at 2:30 o'clock sharp. In the
event of rain after noon, the game
will probably be postponed, but if the
weather conditions are at all favor-
able, the contest will be played as an-
nounced.
HOUSE PASSES IMMIGRATION
BILL WITH LARGE MAJORITY[

Carpenters, plumbers and electri
cians employed at the new Universit
hospital, who went out on strike Apr
8, have not yet returned to work an
at present only .a few bricklayers an
stonesetters are working at the hos
pital. Work is being greatly delaye
according to E. M. Tessier because o
the nuniber of men thrown out o
work irrespective of strikers. "Then
does not see' to be" any prospect c
immediate settlement," declared Tes
sier, "but conferences are being hel
between the workers' representative
and the Washtenaw Building Employ
ers' association. Work at present is c
course being delayed."
The men struck because of a redu'
tion in wagehfrom $1 an hour to $.8
an hour.. This reduction was mad
to conform with voluntary reductin
made by unions in every city in Micl
igan except Ann Arbon.
SLIDE RULE SLIDE
TONIGHT FOR '231
Sophomore engineers hold the
spring party at 8 o'clock tonight
Barbour gymnasium. The music, whit
will be furnished by "Nobe" Wethe
bee and his orchestra, will contini
until 12 o'clock. The party this ye
is known under the name, "Slide Ru
Slide". A large attendance is expec
ed from the advance sale of .ticke
Men who have been unable to 0
tain tickets from the social committ
may buy them at the door of the gyr
nasium, as there are still a few lE
for disposal,
PROFITEERING HELD CAUSE OF
DIFFICULTIES OF RAILROA

Washington, April 22. - After re-

f
t
,
't
f
i
l

final announcement of the program jecting an amendment seeking to of- Chicago, April 22.-Wir tme an
will not be made until this afternoon. fer the choice of the United States to post war .profiteering chiefly in coc
Robert J. McClandiss, '21, who is an foreign political refugees, the house and steel product, were held respon
old-timer among student entertainers, today passed the immigration re- sible for a largo part of the financia
and his "Fuzzy-Wuzzy" and "Chip of striction bill substantially in the same difficulties of American railroads i
the Old Block" are expected to be form it went through last session an exhibit fled by the railway unio
among the hits of the show.only to be given a potket veto. before the railroad labor board toda
George Sloan, '23, has. prepared a The bill now goes to the senate .by William Jett Lauck, economist fe
monologue which is said to excel even where Republican leaders said today the union.
his act in the fall Spotlight. Sloan has it would be passed without dealy. The "A conservative estimate" of wha
written his own act. measure is designed to be operative the profiteering cost the railroa
Tickets for the presentation, which over a period of 14 months and would from 1916 to 1919, he said, "is $75,000
is to be held in Hill auditorium Tues- limit the entry of aliens to three per 000 a year in coal bills and $200,000,0(
day, April 26, are now on sale at cent of the number of nationalp of a year for steel and iron product
Cushing's drug store and at the cam- any country in the United States at including equipment and repairs ;fro
pus bookstores at 50 cents, the time of the 1910 census. locomotives and car companies."

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