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April 06, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,HEk MICH1

x

Y
Univer-

vely entitled to the use for
edited to it or not otherwise
ews published therein.
Arbor, Michigan, as second
3.50.
ng, Maynard Street.
1. 2414.
o words, if signed, the sig-
print, but as an evidence of
ublishted in The Daily at the
mailed to The Daily office.
no consideration. No man
iter incloses postage.
endorse the sentiments ex.
ot be received after 8 o'clock

end of college life is near. It is the glad senior who
says, "I'm thankful I kept an 'M' book," and it is
a regretful graduate who leaves Michigan wishing'-
he had a record of his college days to take with him.
When this round of university life is over and we
have occasion to reminisce by the fireside with an
"M" book, the little button of the frosh pot or the
receipt for senior class dues will recall such events
as Cap night or the morning of commencement, and
few keepsakes will be more valuable. An "M" book
is ba personal affair and does not always give the
true account to others, but those who do keep such
a journal will count it among the best of the un-
numbered heritages of four years at their 'univer-
sity.
THE LAWS REMEMBER
Let's hope that the decision of the Law school to
revive the old Senior-Faculty Law dinner, which
was held last night, is a true sign of the times.
Michigan of late has been getting all too cosmo-
politan. The conception of unity and the old love
for the broader associations of alma mater have
been giving ground before numbers, until many of
the students are interested either solely in the
amount of fpractical and applicable knowledge they
can wring out of the University or in the good time
they can have in their particular group. Old cus-
toms have been dropping out of sight, their signifi-
cance as builders of spirit and unity forgotten. The
fellowship in a common life and purpose ,which we
ought to feel is giving way to an individualistic at-
mosphere which is a menace to the University.
Canes, and class sings '- the tap room seems to.
have been forgotten for this purpose - and class
meetings and dinners, and traditions of every kind,
are falling into neglect. It's time that all of us, like
the Laws, take stock and revive the Michigan of old
before it becomes too late.

G

Rt

A

H

A

A NEW SHIPMENT OF
EXERCISES IN CURRENT ECONOMICS--- Hamilton
AT
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

11

It

.R ...... . .GEORGE Q. BROPHY JR.
.Che.....Ches Campbell
oard .......................Lee Woodruff,
s H. W. Hitchcock
. 3.E. McManis
.wood T. W.Sarget Jr.~
.. .JA ernstein
. ,.B. P. Campubell
.....T... Whinery, T. A. Kern, S. Beach
.Robert Angell
................... Mary D. Lane
.. Thomas Dwy

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. in., 7:05 a. in.,
8:10 a. in., and hourly to 9:10 p. in."
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. in. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. in. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. in. and eMery two
hours to 9:48 p. in.
Locals to, Detroit-- 55a.m., 7:00 am.
and every two hours 'to 9: 00 p. in.,
also 11:00 p. mn. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a m., and 1:15 am.
Locals to Jackson--7: Wa. in., and
12:10 p.m.
1921 APRIL 1921
S iM T W T F S
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 '12. 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20, 21 '22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

Pike Sidney B. Coates
C. T. Pennoyer
way Marion B. Stahl
Lowell S. Kerr
Marion Koch
Dorothy Whipple
Gerald P. Overton
elly sdward Lambrecht
Sara Waler
gomery H. F,. Howlett

El1tll1l1l1 tEI1l1l111!illittl!l1E1ltllllillllllE1 111
WHITNEY
i
Saturday Nigh
=TGUCHING THE -
fA USICAL COME
JOH N CORT
i J
~rCxuR8OcKuR
-Ha
-CIES, T f
- i r ) .jr e.ur!,c

Use Classified advertising and sell Patronize Daily Advertisers.-Adv.
your miscellaneous articles.--Adv.
Let a classified ad find that lost ar-
Read The Daily for Campus news. ticle.-Adv.

THEATRE
t, April 9
IGH y .SPOT
'D
A A
-jI

Telephone 960
GER.........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR
.D. P. Joyce
.:.':.. ..:.'..l.S. Kunstadter
........... ................S. M. kieatb
S.. . .~. ... Z..R.ri h
..... .. ...............:..... ]. R. Pehsg
........... ..... ............. .F ilr

nts
Ule

H. C. 'Hunt
M. S. Goldring
H. W.' Heidbreder
W. Cooley

onation concerning news for any
ight editor, who has full charge

RED LIGHTS
Flaming red storches lighted the way to the M. C.
station last Friday.night when three thousand cheer-
ing students saw Michigan's track men off to Cali-
fornia. The torches made a splendid effect and
added much to a memorable night; but they also
made a glare which exactly resembled a railroad
danger signal. The result was that a number of
trains going ix each direction were stopped down
the track and traffic was held up until the pep and
the flare were over.
Next time it 'will be well to remember this smash-
ing of schedules and tie-up of freight, and avoid red
lights when staging a sendoff. Torches add much
to a pep-meeting, but they are very hard on engi-
neers, dispatchers, and superintendents when
lighted on the right of way.

(I

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 1921.
Nlight Editor--T. W. SARGENT, JR.
'ubs' club will meet at 4 o'clock this after-
THE SENSE IN SOCIOLOGY
it day Americans are apt to place great
1 practicality. Anything which appeals to
being impractical or visionary is dismissed
nsideration out of hand. Perhaps that is
sociology courses are denied their right-
e in our University curriculum. Appar-
ey are inapplicable to life as it is lived,
there are few subjects so worthy of study
sh to understand and solve the problems of
>gy is, in reality, highly practical. Through
>f the development of social institutions we
a realization of the fact that society, its
and its laws are the product of evolution,
L growth rooted in the mists of antiquity.
y is not now and never has been a static
ion. Times and conditions of life change.
ery major change, a new set of problems
i on the successful solution of these prob-
ends the welfare of man. Many of these
are not actually new, they are only dis-
. a new form.
reform, the problem of crime, organized
>overty, unemployment, the question of col-
irgaining, the institution of marriage, what
lists term the class struggle, all these and-
nilar questions of primary importance to
ng social order are taken up by sociology.
ent of the social science is sometimes a bit
o discover that every one of them has two
- that his own pet notions are entirely
r at best hopelessly biased.
however, is good for the student. It tends-
ite broadmindedness and the habit of care-
.lyzing a situation from both sides before
o an unalterable decision. Having gone
he is well on the road to tolerance because
ealize that he can seldoni obtain all of the.
n any specific case and will consequently
to argument at all times.
erplexing situations which constantly bob
eaten the continuation of any highly com-
al order demand a broad understanding
mpathetic interpretation if they are to be
. These are the two essential things which
givesto its students. They are the things
e sorely needed by American legislators
THE "M" BOOK
y a day passes in our college career but
ething is seen or .heard that deserves re-
ig. Whether it be a good lecture, a con-
thletic contest, or a social function, events
antly occurring which will be worth recol-
days to come. For the purpose of retain-
reminiscences nothing could be more val.
n an "M" book. One sometimes does not
e sign c a +if.rv t - n-+:~- r, f ":-nt"

N ORTH WEST E R
UNIVERSI T Y
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
LAW SCHOOL
(The oldest Law School in
Chicago)
Summer Session from Monday,
June 20 to Saturday, August 20.
Fall term begin~s Monday, Sep-
tember 26.
Candidates for a degree are, re-
quired to present proof of sat-
isfactory completion of three
years of college study.
College graduates may complete
the law course in three academ-
ic years (27 months); for all
others four academic years (36
months) is required.,
For bulletins'and detailed infor-
mation, address Secretary of the
Law School, Northwestern Uni-;
versity Building, 31 West Lake
Street, Chicago, Ill.

GOOK AND LYR~ICS BY
HAIRY L. CORT ANNO
GEO. IF. STODDPRD
M UISI G BY HAROLD? 0RLOO

Prices: Lower Floor $2.00, Balcony $1.00-$1
SEATS NOW SELLING BY MAIL
annnut tur u iE unri ununuuumiunininuunnununi

I

SEEN ON ANY STAGE

The
Dartmouth Club .of Detroit

11 ,

The Telescope

Announces the
Second Annual Concert
of the
Dartmouth College Musical Clubs

The only thing bad about the
Advice to "think twice before
You speak" is that if most of '
The Fair Ones around here
Followed this injunction the
Chances are about 7 to o
They would be stricken dumb.
We thank you.
How to Write a Play
So many of our readers have asked us to explain
the technic of playwriting that we have decided to
give them a few practical hints which they may
find valuable in writing, either plays or Union
operas.
The first thing is to decide on a short, peppy,
snappy title. Thus, for instance, for our little one
act play we have decided on the title: "HE WHO
HATH SAID IN HIS HEART THERE IS NO
GOD IS A FOOL".
The scene of this act is laid in a dean's office. A
realistic effect is'achieved ,by a neat little gold let-
tered sign reading:
Ormicz HOURS
12:05 to 12:10 every day except week days
and Sundays
If possible also try to show a little waiting room
lined on both sides with students waiting to see the
dean.. Let the women have the usual very red
cheeks and let the men be white faced. This will
tnpart what is generally known as local color. Have
remains of lunches scattered on the floor. Since the
characters in this -drama of college life are sup-
posedto be more intelligent than the average it is
supposed they will have the foresight to bring
lunches while they await their turn.
But all this setting is desirable rather than abso-
lutely necessary. The actual scene is laid. in the
dean's office. All the furniturethat is needed is a
carpet on which, of course, the student must be
standing. The following dialogue will be found ef-
fective as a beginning:
Student-Sir, I 've come to own up to the fact
that I drank some whiskey the other night.
Dean (sternly)--You did, eh? How much?
Student (modestly)-Sir, I came to confess, not
to boast.
With.these simply-spoken lines we think the
prospective playwright has something around which
he may evolve a very readable play.
Famous Closing Lines
"A bad habit to get into," said the co-ed as she
found considerable difficulty in putting on the rid-
ing costume.
NOAHCO T-TTTNT-T

J

Thursday, April Seventh, Nineteen Twenty-One
Hotel Statler, Detroit

Dancing from ten until one '

i
4

I

5' ekets on sale at Grinnell's, Detroit, and
Wahr's Bookstore, Ann Arbor
8:30 p, M.

( Subscription $5.50
Single Tickets $2.75
(War lax included)

04i D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE

i

'
ly

Seniors: Order Your Canes
B ef o r e Spring Vacstion

The

Knickers

included with our sport suits are
ideal for tramping, canoeing, golf,
tennis, practically all-out door sports

A select stock from four leading
domestic and Engi sh lines

fifty -t seventyfive dollars

WAGNER and COMPANY
state utr eet at Liberty
- established 1848 -

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