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April 06, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-06

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DAY AND

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 1921.

PRICE

a

uSES
N Of
BELIEF

DISAPPOINTED IN
E OF VOTE

NOT
DEFEAT
for Mayor
n Provides

he rejection of Ann
cipal charter at the
id belief that it was
conditions and not
in the plan itself.
opinions of busi-
d yesterday on the

X. Freeman,. chairman of the cam-
committee, in favor pf the char-.
xpr ssed the general view when
id that if the proposition had
on its own merits and had not
subjected to party controversy
iuld' have passed. He said that
lan was the work of a number
pable men and women and had
rious faults that would bring op-
on of themselves.
"venth Ward Vote Surprises
s Grnger; city treasurer and a
i supporter of the plan, said that
lntire of the sixth and seventh
to poll a heavy vote in its fav-
s a ,big srprise, as they were
ad on to overcome the lead that
xpe'cted from the opposition of
wer wards. The nlytause that
rranger could discover' for "the
e of the proposition was the
k emphasis laid by its opponents
e possibility of increased taxes,
e the provisions in. both old and
charters limiting tax assess-
k Sugden, State street druggist,
uted the failure to over-adver-
ei on the part of aggressive
rters and the Ann Arbor Times
which rejected all communica,
on the subject except actual
dents of fact. He believes that
#inor .defects of the plan could
been easily remedied by amend-
after it had gotten into working
and that they did not make it
.esirable than the present faulty
Disappointment Expressed┬░
umber of other men, who did not
their opinions quted, expressed
disappointment at the rejectioif
plan and said that Ann Arbor
a last town of any size In the
to revise its charter was rele-
itself to a backward condition.
W. Dwyer, defeated Democratic
late for mnayor and an opponent
e plan; expressed an opposite
He said that the old charter
led a well-balanced council, effi-
administrative functions of the
, and guarantees against cor-
m and sectional legislation,
in which the new charter failed.
vis To Review
Vorld IMissions
eoptican views taken by the
er will illustrate the lecture giv-
James Hamilton Lewis on the
t, "Citizens of the New World",
'clock tonight in Lane hall.
Lewis is a mission worker of
experience and he will give a
e of world missions in his lec-
At present he is candidate sec-
for the Methodist Board of
n. Missions. Formerly he had
three years in China and has
d much time to studying the
ions of other countries.
lecture is being given under
splces of the World Service de-
ent of the S. C. A., which aims
ng speakers capable of discuss-
e big problems connected with
a countries to Ann Arbor about
t month.
owing the lecture, which will
bout an hour, Mr. Lewis will at-
to answer all questions directed

CHICAGO VACATION
SP E C I A L ASSURED
"The special train which was plan-
end for thecvacation traffic is.now a
certainty," was the statement made
yesterday by A. J. Wiselogel, local
agent for the Michigan Central rail-
road. "The train will pull into Ann
Arbor about 1 o'clock Friday after-
noon, and will leave about 1.23 o'clock
for Chicago. There will be at least
three Pullmans, a dining car, and sev-
eral day coaches in the train," said
Mr. Wiselogel.
A cording to the local agent, reser-
vvations are being made and tickets
are being bought with satisfactory
speed. "ut," warned Mr. Wiselogel,
"the time for reservations for Pull-
mans is now growing short, and if
there are still any students who have
not secured . accommodations, they
should do so at once."
MICHIGAN TRACKTEAM
AIVES AT BERKELEY
FoR AURDYSMEET
INTEREST IN CONTEST AT HIGH
PITCH ON CALIFORNIA
CAMPUS
(By a Special Correspondent)
Berkeley, Calif., April 5. - The 15
Michigan track athletes arrived here
safely at 7:40 o'clock this morning on
the Southern Pacific. The men went
at once to. the Sigma Alpha Epsilon
house, which has been vacated by the
members and turned over to the
Wolverines during their stay here.
The men spent most of the morning
exploring the campus and seeing the
noted sights of the campus. The
Campanile excited the most attention,
but the beauty of the campus in gen-
eral was most admired. The first real
workout since the team left Ann Ar-
bor was on the bill for the afternoon.
The runners loosened up stiff muscles
by long jogs on the cinders, and the
jumpers tried the pits. A large crowd
of California students were out on the
field to watch the Wolverine work-
outs. The interest in the meet is at
high pitch, an promises to increase
as the week progresses.
A hard practice has been promised
the men by Coach Farrell for tomor-
row, and following that the squadi will
rest until the meet, except for easy
jogging to keep in shape. The weight
men will work out every day.
COSMOPOLITANS INITIATE
DEAN EFFINGER, PROF. SITH
Dean John R. Effinger, of the liter-
ary college, and Prof. Arthur W.
Smith, of the physics department, were
initiated to honorary membership in
the Cosmopolitan club, and 10 stu-
dents were taken into active member-
ship at a special meeting last night at
the Phi Kappa Psi house.
F. C. Liu, '21L, master of ceremo-
ies, set forth the ideal of the club,
"Cosmopolitanism, not narrow na-
tionalism"; Professor Smith outlined
the connection between sciences and
international relations, and Dean Ef-

finger summarized the advantages de-
rived by the University from the at-
tendance of foreign students.
FRESHMAN GLEE CLUB WILL
REHEARSE AND DO BUSINESS
The Freshman Glee club will hold
its rehearsal at 7 o'clock tonight at
the Union. Tonight's rehearsal will
begin earlier than the usual hour to
allow time for a short business meet-
ing which will follow.
Mr. Thomas has an important an-
nouncement to make and is desirous
that every member be present so that
action may be taken on the matter to
be brought up.
Alpha Nu Meets Friday Evening
Alpha Nu will hold its regular meet-
ing at 7:30 o'clock Friday night in its'
club rooms in University hall. An
important business session for -mem-
bers will be the only business trans-
-.1.

TWENTY SELECTED
BY TAU BETA P[
Taken Into Upperelass Engineerng
Society for Sciolarship and
Campus Work
INITIATION OF NEOPHYTES
SET FOR SATURDAY, APR. 23
Tau Beta Pi, honrary upperclass
engineering society at its spring elec-
tion held recently, selected the follow-
ing 20 men for membership: P. C.
Ackerman, '22E, B. L. Beckwith, '21E,
R. N. DuBois, '22E, W. L. Fink, '21E,
R. M. Hazen, '22E, A. L..-May, '22E, R.
E. Swart, '22E, and S. B. Smith, '22E,
of the mechanical engineering depart-
ment; W. E. Bandemer, '22E, G. F.
Emery, '22E, Milton Goetz, '22E, G. W.
McCordic, '22E, H. S. Simpson, '22E,
and A. D. Stauffer, '22E, of the' civil
engineering department; R. C. Berg-
vall, '21E, T. R. Halman, '21E, F. D.
Johnston, '22E, and H. B. Seeley, '22E,
and A. J. Maslin, '22E, of the electri-
cal engineering department; E. B.
Tucker, '22E, of the chemical engi-
neering department.
These men were taken into the so-
ciety as reward for their high schol-
astic standing and general interest
and participation in, canpus activ-
ities. The new men were selected by
the present members of the society
with -consideration of faculty opinion
on the possible candidates.
The initiation date has been set for
Saturday, April 23.
RENT REGULATIONS
DISCUSSED IN LAW
REVIEW TREATISE
Alan W. Boyd, '21L, is the author
of a paper entitled, "Rent Regu-
lations Under Police Power," appear-
ing in the April number of the Law
Review which cqmes out today. The
article deals with legal conditions re-
sulting from the widespread housing
shorta caused by the cessation of
buildin during the war. Leading
opinions are quoted on both sides of
the question as to whether police reg-
ulations are able to solve the rent
situation. Boyd concludes with "The
choice is for the legislature alone,
however, not for the courts."
"Departure frm Precedent," by
Prof. H. W. Humble, of the Univer-
sity of Kansas, is an article .question-
ing whether the death of reasons for
legal doctrines should also cause the
death of the doctrines themselves.
What is said to be a complete dis-
sertation on the subject of watered
stocks and blue sky laws is an article
by William W. Cook, grad., of New
York City.
The usual departments of "Note'and
Comment," "Recent Important Decis-
ions," and "The History of Michigan
Constitutional Provision Prohibiting
a General Revision of the Laws," by
W. L. Jenks, of Port Huron, are said
t4( be worthy of note.
C. D. Allin, of the University of Min-
nesota, reviews Edwin DeWitt Dickin-
son's new book, ."The Equality of
States in International Law," which
concludes the current Law Review.
Thespians Offer
one-Act Plays
Members of the Players club will

present three of Lady Gregory's plays
at 8 o'clock tonight in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall.. The plays are: "The
Spreading of the News", "The Work-
houseWard", and "The Rising of the
Moon".
Student members of the club pro-'
duced and directed all three of the
plays. The presentations will be giv-
en for the members and their invited
guests. Members may obtain tickets
for themselves and their guests free
of charge at Wahr's book store not
laterthan this noon.'

REGENTS SAWYER,
GORE RE-ELECTED
By one of the largest majorities in
the history of the state, Regent W. H.
Sawyer, of Hillsdale, and Regent V.
M. Gore, of Benton Harbor, were re-
elected in the recent state elections.
The terms of both were to expire Dec.
31, 1921.
Regent Gore, who Is now returning
from a-trip to Hawaii, was chosen by
the Board of Regents to induct Presi-
dent Marion L. Burton into office at
the time of his inauguration, and gave
a speech that, according to Regent
Junius E. Beal, is one of the most not-
able ever delivered on the platform of
Iill auditorium. Regent Sawyer has
been of particular service by hi sup-
port of the Medical school and the
new University hospital, according to
Regent Beal.
There will be a specld meeting of
the Regents the latter part of this
week.
CANFIELD GIVES ~ CAU S
FOR DCREASE IN STUDY
OF GERMAN AD RENCH
SPANISH BECOMES MORE POP.
LA AS OTHERS LOSE
FOLLOWERS
Recent decreases in the enrollments
in German and French and increases
in Spanish in high schools and col-
leges are the result of well-marked
tendencies in our educational system,
according to Prof. A. G. Canfield, head
of the romance languages department,
in commenting on an article in a re-
cent issue of "School and Society", a
magazine devoted to problems in edu-
cation.
Decrease Is Natural
The falling off in German, which
took place in the fall of 0918, will
not be offset to any extent within the
present generation, according to Pro-
fessor Canfield, although its manifest
cultural advantages and especially its
importance in scientific study will
bring it back eventually to something
like its former .position. The' de-
crease was a natural result of antipa-
thy during the war period and has
gone so far as to bring complete
elimination of the subject in all but
one of 200 high schools in the state.
In most cases the decrease in Ger-
,man was offset by a corresponding i-
crease in Spanish; according to Pro-
fessor Canfield. The enormous rise
of the study of Spanish is due to cos-
er? economic and political relations
with South America and is caised by
a real desire to learn the language, as
Is shown by the answers to questions
asked .of students in the department
at the University at the beginning of
the year. Practically without exep-
tion the reason for taking Spanish was
given as the desire to secure a talk-
ing and reading knowledge of the lan-
guage, as opposed to the wish of many
French students to learn the litera-
ture and culture of the people.
*Reaction Causes Decline
The decline in French study that
was noted, Professor Canfield said,
was due to the natural reaction from
the great interest in 'France during
the war and will continue for some
time as relations become less, close.
Another factor is the poor- teaching
that is given, particularly in the
smnaller high schools where special

teachers could not be secured. The
fvture of French lies with the quali,
ty of instruction that is given, the
professor believes, and as it improves
the enrollment in French will under-
go a revival.
SENIOR ENGINEERS TO PICK
MANAGER AND COMMITTEES
Election of a class baseball man-
ager and appointment of the Swing-
out committee will constitute the main
business at the meeting of the senior
engineers at 9 o'clock tomorrow
morning in room 348 of the Engineer-
ing building.
Other matters to be discussed will
include the report of the committee
on the code of ethics, which was ,ap-
pointed at the last meeting of the
class. A vote will be taken to deter-
mine the question of the wearing of
senior canes and the time for the
wearing of tann sulnd wns.

Senior Laws And
Faculty Gather
At Big 7anquet
Relations of the modern lawyer to
the requirements of his practice were
discussed at the banquet given by
the senior laws for the faculty of the
Law school last night in the Union.
More than 70 seniors were present out
of a total class enrollment of 100,
auguring well for the continuance of
these affairs which formerly were an
annual institution.
The first speaker, V. E. Crossley,
'21L, stated that such banquets are'
of great, importance in fostering the
closer relations between students and
faculty that are necessary if their
common problems are to be solved. He
then asserted that the present system
of examinations in the Law school is
unfair because it leaves daily work.
too much out of consideration.
Prof. Burke Shartell, who replied
for the faculty, said that the great
need at present is for the lawyer
whose lnoweldge of principles is sucli
that he can handle ca es upon which
no precedent has been established.
G. D. Clapperton, '21L, concluded
by sayfng that the pre-law student of
the present day can accomplish more
in his two-year preparation than the
ordinary man in four, due to the ob-
jective that the law always has before
/him.
Dean Henry M. Bates, the last
speaker, defended the examination
system as the most workable that can
be evolved, although he recognized its
faults. He then discussed "The Law-,
yer of the Future."
DARTMOUTH CLUBS
GIVE CONCERT IN
DETROIT THURSDAY
Friendly spirit which of recent
years has become more pronounced
between Michigan and Dartmouth
will become crystallized at the con-
cert of the Dartmouth musical clubs
to be given at 8:30 o'clock Thursday
night at the Hotel Statler in Detroit.
The affair, which will be followed by
a dance, is to be held under the aus-
pices of the Dartmouth club of De-
troit, and a cordial invitation has been
extended to all Michigan students. to
attend.
Embracing 15 cities on its itinerary,
the combined musical clubs of the
Eastern college have been receiving
ovations at every performance. At
the annual musical contest of Eastern
colleges held recently in New York the
Dartmouth organisation acquitted it-
self in a creditable manner, accord-
ing to press reports.
Fifty musicians are making the
trip and besides numbers by the
Glee, Mandolin, and Banjo clubs, the
program will contain specialty acts of
a musical and vaudeville nature.
Tickets, which are on sale at Wahr's
bookstore and at Grinnell's music
store in Detroit, are $5.50 a couple
including admission to the dance.
Dance and concert tickets separately
are $2.75 apiece for each event.
FRESH LITS MEET TO MAKE
PLANS FOR ANNUAL FROLIC
Members of the freshmen' literary
class will meet at 4 o'clock this aft-
ernoon in University Hall to discuss
the Freshman Frolic that will be
held some time in May. Other busi-
ness to be taken up will be the elec-
tion of a, baseball manager and dis-

cussion on the question of giving
sweaters to the men who played on
the class basketball team. This will
be the next to the last reeting of the
freshmap class.f
TWELVE CLASSES BEHIND
IN DUES
Treasurers of the senior and
freshman law, the % junior and
sophomore medic, the junior and
freshman architects, the senior,
sophomore, and freshman dental,
the junior' homoeopathic, and
the junior and sophomore phar-
mic classes have not yet paid the'.
Student, council assessment for
the year 1920-1921. 'Payment
should be made immediately to
the council treagurer, Thornton
W. Sargent, Jr., at 512 South
State street.

PARALYSIS MAY SPREAD TO
TRANSPORTATION
'FACILITIES
STRIKERS RIOT AF TEI
HOISTING RED FL
Three Great Unions, Meet Wedne
to Decide on National
Action
BULLETIN
London, April 5. - Rioting b
out Tonight in connection with the
strike in Cowdenbeath in Fises
Scotland, according to' a Ce
News dispatch. The police atta
the strikers with batons, but
strikers hoisted the red flag am
sieged the polio station.
(By .Associated Press)
London, April -5.-The stoppii
all coal mining in Great Britain:i
accomplished fact, and -the que
the public is considering anxic
tonight is whether the paralysis
extend to the railways and c
means of transport and even sp
among the workers generally.
Parliament Debates
Both houses df parliament disc
ed. the situation today without to
any steps to relieve it. The nat
transport workers federation delej
conferred without reaching a dec
as to whether to call a strike in
port of the miners. The three bra
es of the triple alliance, the rai
men, the transport workers, and
miners will meet separately te
row, which promises to be a dec
day.
The most serious feature of thf
uation continues to be the thre
ruin of the mines by -flooding.
miners took strong measures in
eral places today against the ow
who are protecting their propert
Factories Close
Reports of factories closing co
ued to be published, but it is imp
ble to estimate the industries tha
suffering through the strike bec
temporary closing and short time
been extremely common recently.
attitude of the public and woi
seemingly is that this is as good a
as any for threshing out the
problem of reduced wages, which
employers contend is necessary i
country is to continue doing busi

BRITISH MIN
.HALTED; Nil
SINDUSTRlY I

SCHOOL OF MUS
GLEE CLUB F

FIVE FORM1AL
GIVEN THROl
Mul

For the second time in its
the University School of Music
Glee club will make a short I
the state during spring-vacatio
concerts in allwillbe given, tt
club appearing in Dowagiac,
Creek, Durand, Chelsea, and N9
Twenty-five members of ,the
the director, Miss Maude C. KR
the School-of Music faculty, an
panist, and a Detroit reader wil
the trip. All of the concerts
formal and are given under tt
pices of the University alumn
the exception of the Dowagiac
al, which is being slonsored
local Rotary club.
The itinerary is as follows:
April 8; Dowagiac, April 13;
Creek, April 14; Durand, Apr
Chelsea, April 16. Other trips
remainder of the college year
,ing planned.
PROF. KENYON DISCUSSES
, SPANISH JOURNEY TO
Prof. 'Herbert A. Kenyon,
romance language departmei
give an illustrated lecture in
on "A Journey Through Spain"
o'clock tonight in the Natural
auditorium. The lecture will
interest to all students of 5
Tickets may be purchased trot

COUNCIL MEETING

Nominations for next year's
president of the Student council
will be made at the council
meeting at 7:15 o'clock tonight
in room 306 of the Union. Le-
Grand A. Gaines, Jr., '21E, urges
every member to be present.

'

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