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April 01, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-01

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND WARNER
TODAY

r 4ie irt rn 4kiI1lj

U*.

DAV AND NIGHIT
ERVJCE

VOL. XXXI. No. 127.
STERS
GTHER ┬░NHEEFOR
58THCONVENTION
FINAL SESSION OF SHORT-TERM
STATE INSTITUTE i
HELD
SECTIONS OF MICHIGAN
SCIENCE ACADEMY MEET
Snedden Speaks on Functioning Types
of Mental Discipline Possible
in Secondary Schools
Schoolmasters from over the state
poured Into Ann.:Arbor by the hu-
dreds yesterday for the opening ses-
sions of the fifty-eighth annual meet-
ing of the Michigan Schoolmasters'
club, which will hold sway here for
the remainder of the week. The final
session of the seventh short-term state
institute was held in connection with
the opening meeting of the School-
masters' club in Hill auditorium from
10 to 12 'clock yesterday morning.
Prof. David Snedden, of Teachers'
college, Columbia university, spoke on
"Functioning Types of Mental Disici-
pline Possible in Secondary Schools".
"Changing Conceptions of the Second-
ary School" was the subject f Dean
E. P. Cubberly, of Leland Stanford
Jr. university, who closed the morn-
ing program.
Conference Continues
Conference of the classical, modern
language, English, history, physics
and chemistry, mathematics, biologi-
cal, commercial, geographic and geo-
logical, high school, library, music,
and the manual arts departments,
were held at various places about the
campus throughout the entire day
Thursday and will be continued today.
This is the twenty-sixth annual
ieeting of the Michigan Academy of
Science, and the opening speech was
made in the Botany section yesterday
afternon by former Prof. Parish Love-
joy. At 8 o'clock last night a spe-
cial lecture on "Time Perspective in
Culture and Race" was delivered in
the Natural Science auditorium by Dr.
Clark Wissler, of the National Re-
search council.
Dr. Wissler gave as a definition of
Anthropology the study of the Amer-
ican Indian; his origin, time of ar-
rival, and subsequent history. He em-
phasized his lecture by drawing dia-
grams on the blackboard and told how
scientists read the history and stud-
ied the conditions of the human race
from excavations and surface discov-
eries. He also explained how the his-
tory and travellings of the Indian
were learned from debris left in their
camps.
Friday Speaks
The economics division of the gen-
eral session was opened by an ad-
dress of Prof. C. L. Benner, of the
economics department of the Univer-
sity. His subject was "Is War Paid
For?" He said that three things must
be considered: cost of mobilization,
cost of the atual war, and the cost
of demobilization. The first, accord-
ing to Professor Benner, is npt paid
for. The second is paid for because
the people of the present were forced
(to pay in order to get goods with
which to carry on the war. He then
said that demobilization Is not paid
for.
A paper was also read by Prof.
David Friday on "An Extension of the

Theory of Value", and by W. L.
Thorpe on "Correlation and the Price

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 1921:

PRICE FIVE

STA TE OF UNCERTAINTY
PERSISTS IN BUSINESS
Washington, March 31.-Busi-
ness shows little indication this
month of getting away from the
uncertainties of the last year,
according to the monthly review
of conditions made public to-
night by the federal reserve
board.. Increased activities were.
noted in some cases but except
in those exceptions commerce
apparently was waiting for
further developments before
moving towards anything like
normal conditions, federal agents
reported.
SUflAY SPEAKERI

GIVE 'EM A FIGHTIN' START !

At 11:42 tonight fifteen men, Michigan tracksters, are leav-
ing Ann Arbor for the West. They are going to Berkeley. there
to uphold Michigan's honor against the University of California, j
a school that is noted for its athletic teams and that came out
of last fall's football fray astride the national title
. Those fifteen men have worked hard and have given their
every effort to the end that this trip may be a successful one,
and now it is certainly up to every man and woman who has the
interests of Michigan at heart to show the men on that squad
that they aren't going to California unsupported, in spite of the-
length of the trip.
We turn out Friday nights for dances, the theater, parties,
and one thing or another. If we can spend the most of the night
in other pursuits, there, is no reason why we can't afford to de-
vote an hour toward a demonstration of the kind of spirit that
will send the members of that team on their way with their
heads up, resolved to show us that they are the fighters we thinkI
they are. We can't go with them to the coast, but we can let
them know that we are behind them, even if they are two thou-
sand miles away.
Let's not have only a handful out tonight. Let every Mich-
igan booster and fighter follow the band to the station to give
that squad a regular old rousing "Michigan-fight-'efi" kind of
good-bye and good luck!
"SUBTLY APPEAING" IS JUDGMENT
OF THIRHD NIGHTERS AT uNION OPERA

JAMES CARDINAL GIBfBONS
BURIED WITH ALL HONORS
Baltimore, Md., March 31.-
James Cardinal Gibbons, arch-
bishop of Baltimore, was buried
today with all the honors that
the Catholic church could be-
stow on one of its princes.'
To the cathedral of the As-
sumption of the Blessed Virgin
Mary-the great stone pile about
which the cardinal's life re-
volved-poured prelates of equal
rank, diplomats and statesmen
from Washington, high officials
of the land and state he had ser-
vedkand members of his own
flock. Outside, in the rain were
massed bareheaded thousands
unable to press Into the church,
who stood reverently for three

hours
quicm

while the
mnass was

ponificial re-
being sung.

To

Take "Social Problems as Illus-
trated from Court Room Ex-
perience" as Subject

FAST GAMES OPEN
BASKETBALL MEET

HAS HAD MUCH PRACTICAL
EXPERIENCE IN THIS LINE
"Social Problems as Illustrated
from Court Room Experience" will be
the subject of the address which Miss
Mary M. Bartelme, assistant to the
judge of the juvenile court of Cook
county, Ill., will - deliver at the next
Union service to be held at 7:30
o'clock Sunday evening at Hill audi-
torium, according to an announcement
of the committee made public yester-
day.'
Miss Bartelme is said to be well
qualified to discuss this subject since
she has been connected with sociolog-
ical work from a legal standpoint
since 1897, first as public guardian of
Cook county and later as assistant to
the judge of the juvenile court. In
her former position =she handled the
estates of several thousand minors,
ranging in value from $50 to several
thousand dollars. In manyeases she
was also guardian of the person as
well, and had direction of the care
and education of these children, a
large majority of whom she placedin
private homes. As assistant to the
judge she examined the cases of de-
linquent girls, making a report to the
judge for his decision. She has han-
dled more than 4,000 cases of this
kind.
The music for this program will be
furnished by the Girls' Glee club and
Mr. Wiliam Wheeler, tenor. The or-
ganist will be Leonard Brooks. Dr.
Henry Tatlock, rector of St. Andrew's
Episcopal church, will read the scrip-
tures and offer the prayer, while
George 0. Brophy, '22L, will preside.

Milan Defeats Charlevoix in
Contest with Score of
15-11

Speedyl

TRACK MEN WILl
GET BIG SEND 01
FOR TRIP TO WE11
15 MEN LEAVE FOR CALIFOT
MEET AT 11:42 O'LOCK
TONIGHT
BAND AND STUDENTS
PARADE TO M. C. DEP
Torehiight Procession Wil Make
eit of Campus ed
by Band
Starting from Hill auditorium a
o'clock tonight, the 15 members of
Varsity track team who are to 1
for California at 11:42 o'clock wi
escorted to the Michigan Central
tion by the Varsity band and a tc
light procession of cheering stud
under the leadership of Al Cuth
'21E, Varsity cheer leader.
Before leaving for the station,
planned to have the band lead the
cession in a march around the
pus, thus enabling all students in
vicinity to join the festivities.
All arrangements have
made," said Robert W. Christie,
student councilman in charge of
rangements. "and all that remain
be done is to urge that every b
Michigan student be present to
the team atlfighting start toward
tory. I cannot stress the fact
much that this is a chance for
Michigan men to show their spiri
One week from tomorrow the t
team will compete with the Unive
of California at Berkely. The s
day a boat race will be staged betv
the University of Washington and
ifornia besides the Leland Stan
Jr. University vs. California base
game. The day will be the bigge
its kind ever attempted in the N
and Michigan is said to be moret
fortunate in being able to be or
the participants.
All members of -the Varsity band
asked to report at Hill audito
shortly before 11 o'clock tonight.
ANDRE WS, PROMINENT
EDUCATOR, TAUS TOI
Prof. Charles M. Andrews, of
history department of Yale unive:
who is to talk. on "Reflections o:
American Revolution, at 3 o'clock
afternoon in Natural Science auc
ium, has had a long career as an
structor, lecturer, and writer of

(By J. ┬░L Dakin and T. W. Sargent, Jr.)
The usual signal for the hasty de-
parfure of the nervous members of
an audience, the frantic searching for
hats, and lost pocketbooks, and the
hurried twisting into' coats - the
grand finale and then the ringing down
of the curtain - saw only a few peo-
ple hurry out of last night's perform-
ance of "Top o' th' Mornin'", and
STATE INTRCOLSI
A SSOCIATION ENTERS
MI-ESTL EERTION
ACTION TAKEN AT GATHERING
HELD YESTERDAY IN
HIGH SCHOOL
Adoption of a new constitution, join-
ing the Mid-West federation of high
school athletic associations and pav-
ing the way for affiliation with the
Upper 'Peninsula Interscholastic Ath-
letic association was the chief business
transacted at the annual meeting of
the Michigan Interscholastic Athletic
association held in the high school
here yesterday afternoon.
The most important change which
will be installed in Michigan high
school athletic management under the
new constitution is the formation of
a board of control to be composed of
the president, vice-president, secre-
tary, and two elected members of the
association.
Has Power to Suspend
The board will have complete con-
trol over all games and contests be-
tween state schools, have the power,

even after the second and final curtain
the audience was indisposed to leave.
Unlike the musical comedy so prev-
alent today, "Top o' th' Mornin' ", de-
spite the tendency to burlesque when
men take women's parts, is one subtly
appealing, and does not depend upon
slapstick comedy for its success. The
opera shows greater perfection in pro-
duction than previous ones. Careful
direction has resulted in a chorus
which dances through intricate steps
as gracefully as is masculinely possi-
ble; the leads seem to have complete
command of the fundamental stage
mannerisms, and the result is a unified
and professional whole, which pleases
from beginning to end.;
George Schemm, '23, who was a
bashful and winsome miss, together
with Buckley .Robbins, '23, the au-
thor of the song, again won uproar-1
ous applause in their skit "Miss Bro-
die's Board ing School for Girls". As
Miltiades, Hilliard Rosenthal, '21, like
his namesake, succeded in overcom-
ing all obstacles and in so doing kept
the house in mirth during the time
he was on the stage, which they de-
manded most of the time.
The leads, Kemp Keena, School of
Music, and E. Marlowe Stevens, '21E,
need no further praising. Howard E.
Ramsay, '21E, took the role of the
trouble innkeeper well,' and Philip
Ringer, '22, and Earl Powers., '22, star-
red in their specialty dance.
In the transformation scene, the
masculine chorus ladies took the parts
of faieies, butterflies, and fawns in
(Continued on Page Eight)

F ARILfINGTON COMES BACK IN
SECOND HALF; WINS 23-181
Michigan's third annual interschol-
astic basketball tournament bbgan
last night in Waterman .gymnasium.
In the two-preliminary games played
Milan defeated Charlevoix 15 to 11
and Farmington won from Briton 23
to 18.
The .Milan-Charlevoix game was
fiercely contested from whistle to
whistle. Milan drew the first blood
when Draper dropped one from the
foul line. The game was fast during
the first half, at the end of which
period the score stood Milan 7, Char-
levoix 5. The floor work and foul
shooting of Draper featured for Mi-
lan. Captain Hammet, of the resoft
town, put up a good defense.
Charlevoix Fights Hard
Charlevoix fought hard the second
nalf but was unable to stop the Mi-
lan offense.
The Farmington-Briton contest was
even speedier than the first game. Fast
dribbling by Gill of Briton placed that
team ahead in the first half 8-7. In
the second half the Farmington team
took a new grip on life and began an
offensive that landed them on top by
a score of 23 to 18. The game was
featured by spectacular shooting by D.
Exelby and Gill of the winners. Ban-
field of the losers starred ' from the
foul line, while Harger covered the
floor in stellar fashion.
Tourney Continues Tomorrow
Tomorrow at 10 o'clock Greenville
meets St. Joe. At 11 o'clock Midland
and Lake Linden will be opponents.
The afternoon games will be between
Carson City and Milan at 2 o'clock
and at 3 o'clock Briton and Harbor
Springs will meet.
The evening games will depend on
the outcome of the morning contests.

(SUSPEND PUBLICATION B0 OARDODERS DILY;

to suspend individuals

or

schools'

of Coal". In the afternoon
Leo Sharfman gave a talk
Financial Results of Federal
Control".

Prof. I.
on "The
Railroad

from participation, and will hear and'
act upon all complaints.
Other features of the constitution
provide that no games shall be played
between members of the M. I. A. A.
and non-association state teams; that
players on high school teams shall
not play with other teams; and that
the annual meeting of the association
shall be held in December in the fu-
ture instead of in the spring.
Acting upon a request from the Up-
per Peninsula High School Athletic;
association that that organization be
allowed to affiliate the members as-
sembled yesterday voted to leave the
matter in the hands of the Board of
Control.

LOUIS BRUCK '16,
BURIED IN BUFFALO
Funeral and reburial services for
Louis M. Bruch, '16, who was killed
in action in France, Nov. 10, 1918, were
held at 11 o'clock, Tuesday, March
29, at the Forest Lawn chapel in
Buffalo, N. Y. Rev. L. B. Chalous,
pastor of the Plymouth Methodist
church, officiated, and music was
furnished by a male quartette and a
soloist.
Pall bearers were members of Com-
pany D, Fort Porter, and a bugler1
from headquarters at Fort Porter,
sounded taps. The deceased was a
son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Bruch, of
Chicago. He was managing editor of

BAD BLOOD BETWEEN WORKERS. CAUSES ACTION'

Due to a terrific battle in The Daily
offices last night shortly before going
to press, the Board in Control of Stu-;
dent Publications has ordered that
publication of The Daily cease for the
balance of this school year. Students
may obtain a partial refund of their
subscription at the office of the busi-
ness manager between the hours of 2
and 5 o'clock tomorow afternoon.
The commotion was the result of
long pent-up feelings between the
night editors and their first assistants.
Last night the situation reached a
climax when the Night Editor, ac-
cording to the first assistant, decided
to run a banner across the top of
page one on the fact that The Daily
had decided to stop publication. Claude
(Shorty) Washburn, chief make-up
man, upheld the view of the night ed-
itor, inasmuch as he had always en-
joyed last minute shifts in front page
attire.
As the situation waxed more dan-
gerous, the second assistant to the
night editor called up the chairman
of the Board in Control of Student

Publications. He was prepared for the'
worst and arrived in full newspaper
attire. Sizing up the situation, he im-
mediately ordered that the news edi-
tor be dropped from the staff, shift-
ed the tele raph editor to the posi-
tion of wonen's editor, while that
person was promoted to assistant
managing editor.
Unable to withhold his rage any
longer, the night editor aimed a lead
slug at the linotype machine but miss-
ed his mark; the slug crashed through
the immense hole on page one, com-
pletely destroying the type stretcher.
Thereupon, the chairman of the
Board in Control sumoned a meeting
of the board in the managing editor's
office and upon recommendation of the
President of the University issued an
order that should today's paper ever
come out, that it be the last this yer.
Next year, under new management,
The wily may resume publication ap-
pearing every other day. Considering
the above facts, and that today is April
1, we may justly call this The Daily's
last issue this semester.

tory.
ln 1889 he was made a pro:
and for the past 30 years he has s
in his capacity, first at Bryn
college then at John Hopkins u
sity and from 1910 until the pres
Yale university. Int1911 he an
extension lecturer at the Univ,
of Wisconsin, and in the fall c
same year he gave a lecture cou
the University of Helsingfors, Fi:
Professor Andrews is a meml
the American Academy of Art
Science, Royal Historical society
of the International Historical sc
Among the books on history th
has pritten tre the following:
onial Self-Government," "A Shor
tory of England," "The Old E
Manor," and "The Historical I
opment of Modern Europe."
COMMITTEE SETS MAY
Arrangements for the ord<
march and tentative plans- for th
gram of Swing-out day to be
Thursday, May 5, were made
meeting of the presidents of gr
ing classes with the Student c
Swing-out committee at 5 o'cloc
terday afternoon in the Union. A
speaker will be secured to talk
exercises, which will be held i
auditorium.
That seniors should be me
for caps and gowns before spri
cation was urged very strong
terday by officials, who point of
the need for immediate action
perative if the last year men N
appear appropriately at the v
functions which require such

Officers Re-elected
As the new constitution

calls for

I.-
LARRY BUTLER, CAPTAIN OF THE
Michigan track team which leaves
tonight for a meet with California.

the election of officers at the Decem-
ber meeting, the old officers of the
association were chosen to serve un-j
til then. They are: president, Prof.1
A. W. Krause, Grand Rapids; vice-
president, Prof. E. M. Conklin, Mar-
shall; secretary, Ora Travis, Pontiac.
The two members of the board of
control, elected to serve until Decem-
ber, are: Prof. I. B. Gilbert, Grand
Rapids, and Prof. N. B. Sloan, Bay
City.

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