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April 22, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A

F
I

lit3f

!oat

it PRESS
DAT AND NIGHT
s SERVICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1920.

PRICE

I LOSE
BIGHTS
ANTELL

University Gets 200 Seats For
"Intercollegiate Day" Ball Game

STUDENT COUNCIL
SUPPORTS Wf- LTER

TO

Two hundred reserved seats for, the
Detroit-Chicago ball game Saturday
afternoon at Navin field will be sent'
out to Ann Arbor today by the com-
mittee in charge of "Intercollegiate
Day" for sale among students who
wish to attend the final celebration of
Michigan Week in Detroit. The tick-
ets will probably be put on sale upon
their arrival at the main desk in the'
Union and will cost $1.25.
Up to 8 o'clock last night, about
50 students had signified their inten-

AIM THEY
"SOLD OUT"
Make Another Try
of Railroads

WOM EN TO HOLD

i.

associated Press)
April 21.-Railroad em-
took part in the unau-
e will not be reinstated
eniority rights it was-
night by J. Mantell,
r the railroad general
ociation, after a confer-
e representatives of the
foods of railway em-
returning strikers will
as new employees.
icement was issued after
ms of the railroad broth-
pent several hours in an
attemp to secure an ex-
e railroads ultimatum
d at noon last Sund ty.
od chiefs sought to gain
until noon tomorrw.
EXPECTED TODAY

Lte strike to an
be made tomor-
pected to call an-
wing the tumult-
today's gathering
announced strike
rote on the ques-
work.
d been "sold out"
ttempts of strike
them to end the
usand strikers to-
meeting when it
Grunau who was
s still in jail. The
in an ; uproar
au, who was held
sed on $10,000 put

Ballots to be Cast in University Hall
Between 8 and 5 O'clock;
Only Women V te
MANY OFFICERS NOMINATED
FOR ,ARIOUS ORGANIZATIONS
Campus organizations of women stu-
dents will hold their annual spring
election today. Ballots must be cast
in University hall from.8 to 5 o'clock.
Only women students vote on these
tickets. Candidates for the various of-
flees of the different bodies are as
follows
Women's league nominees are:
President, Marguerite Clark, '21; Mar-
cella Moon, '21; vice-president, Gladys
Reineke, '21, Aletha Yerkes, '21; re-
cording secretary, Agnes Holmquist,
'22, Amy Loomis, '22; corresponding
secretary, Mildred Harris, '21, Jose-
phine McGinnis, :21; treasurer, Nor-
ma Judson, '21, Ruth Mills, '21; se-
nior director, Helen Master, '21, Elean-
or Stephenson, '21; junior director
(two to be elected), Florence Free-
man, '22, Harriet Gustin, '22, Carol
McDonald, '22, Elinor Neil, '22; sopho-
more director, Gladys Catherwood,
'23, Mary Ives, '23.
Article nine, section four of the con-
stitution of the Women's league
states: Not later than one week be-
fore the date set for the annual elec-
tion, nominations for directors and of-
ficers may be made by petitions sign-
ed by 20 active.members of the Wom
en's league and presented to the ire-
cording secretary or the president.
Women's Athletic association nom-
inees are: President, Eleanor Stephen-
son, '21, Phyllis Wiley, '21; vice-pres-
ident, Alice Hinkson, '21, Helen Koch,
'21; secretary, Doris Gracey, x'21,
Frances Weimer, '22; treasurer, Helen
Bishop, '22, Teckia Roesef '22;.senior
representative, Narcina Bassett, '21,
Quinneth Summer, '21; junior repre-
sentatives, Carol McDonald, '22, Elsie
Townsend, '22; sophomore represent-
atives, Grace Fry, '23, Marion Koch,
'23.
Y. W. C. A. nominees are as follows:
President, Lois DeVries, '21, Beatrice
Beckwith, '21; vice-president, Mary
D. Lane, '21, Freda Stuart, '21; secre-
tary, Laura Snyder, '22, Margaret
Spaulding, '22; treasurer, Helen Koch,
'21, Kathryn Larkin, '22.
COMMITTEE ANNOUNCE B. V. D.
DANCE DATE FOR APRIL 30

tion of attending the luncheon at 12:15
o'clock at the Statler and the ball
game. Only two fraternities had re-
ported up to this time so in order to
give the others an opprtunty to, get
their reservations in the time limit
was extended to 9 o'clock this morn-
ing. In order that reservations for the
luncheon, which will cost $1.25, can
be made, all lists of men intending to
go and the checks for the total amount
must be in by that time.]
Henry Ledyard of Yale will be the
toastmaster at . the Intercollegiate,
luncheon at which it is expected 44
universities and colleges will be rep-
resented. Other speakers will be
James E. Duffy, and Hughie Jennings
of Cornell.
After the luncheon the men will1
form a parade outside the Statler ho-
tel, and headed by a platoon of
mounted police and the Michiagn 7
piece band, they will march via Wood-
ward and Michigan avenues to Navin
field, where a block of 1,000 seats]
have been reserved for the game. The
Band Bounce which will be given here4
tonight will be repeated at. Orchestrai
hall Saturday night as the closing
event of Michigan Week.
GINS IN, STRENGTH
(y Associated Press)S
Washington, April 21. - Reports
from Mexico, official and unofficial,'
today emphasized the growing strength.
of the revolutionary movement led
by the state of Sonora. Advices from
private sources said two new states,
Hidalgo and Tlaxacla, supported by
their legislatures and state. troops,,
had joined the revolutionary move-
ment. Other dispatches told of scat-
tering but strong additions to the
revolution.
General Gomez was said to have
occupied Tuxtam with 3,000 men and
to be threatening Tampico1 the vi-
tal center of Mexico's oil region.
The Mexican embassy issued a for-
mal statement on tle situation today
declaring the revolution to be only a
local. movement. Another statement
from the embassy said Gen. Benja-
min Hill, campaign manager' for
General Obregon who is a candidate
for the presidency and is only siding
with the revolutionists, had been
wounded in a battle in which the
rebel forces were defeated. General
Hill by birth is an American.
MEXICO UNDER MILITARY LAW
San Antonio, April 21.-Unofficial
Mexico City advices received in Mexi-
can circles here today said President
Carranza has asked the Mexican con-
gress to suspend "the individual guar-
antees in order that the entire country
may be placed under military law."
The report could not be confirmed at
the Mexican consulate. Another unof-
ficial report says General Gomez with
4,000 men had captured Tuxtam state
of Vera Cruz and had joined the rev-
olutionary movement.
CHIEF JUSTICE MOORE WILL
GIVE LAW CLASS DAY ADDRESS
Chief Justice Joseph B. Moore of
the Michigan Supreme court has
been obtained to give the annual ad-
dress to the graduating class of the
Law school on Class Day of this
year.
It is always the custom of the Law
school to obtain someone well known

in the legal world for this occasion.
and the Seniors feel well satisfied to
have obtained such a man for their
graduating address, according to
sentiment expressed by leading mem-
bers of the class.

CAMPUS ELECTION DATE'
PUT AHEAD TO MAY 12
Council Rules Men with Less Than
24 Hours Academic Credit Are
Freshmen on Campus
"Michigan's Student council believes
that the University should prove it-
self 100 per cent' behind the national
movement to reduce the present ex-:
cessive price of clothing," said Carl,
Johnson, '20, president of the coun-
cil, after this body had passed the fol-
loiwng resolution:
"Resolved-That toe Student coun-
cil strongly supports the wearing of
old clothes on the campus, said move-
ment to be inaugurated Monday,
April 26."
Not Disreputable Clothes
Council members stated emphatically
that the idea was not to appear on
the campus in disreputable attire, but
merely to use old clothes to the full-
est possible extent until such time as
the prices of clothing falls to a rea-
sonable figure. A strenuous cam-
paign will be instituted beginning
Monday, and all students will be giv-
en an opportunityto sign a pledge to
wear nothing but old clothing on the
campus and at classes. The idea is
not at all that of establishing a tra-
dition and the excessive wearing of
sweaters is discouraged.
As a result of frequent requests the
council decided to set the date of the
all-campus elections ahead one week,
making the'new date Wednesday,, May
12. The committee in charge of the
elections set the time at which the
names of organizations' nominees for
campus offices must be in its hands
as noon of Friday, April, 30: Names
should be be mailed to Henry I. Ea-
ger, '20L, in care of the Student coun-
cil.

DRIVE TO SLASH HIGH
WILL COMtENCE
MONDAY

PRICESl

Effinger Lectures
On "L'Ami Fritz"
"A simple story, simply told."
These were the words with which
Dean John R. Effinger characterized
the coming Cercle Francais play, "L'
Ami Fritz," in his talk yesterday aft-
ernoon. The dean began his lecture
in an informal way by giving some1
of his own personal impressions of the
play which he witnessed in 1895 at
the Theatre Francais in Paris. He
then mentioned the comments it
brought forth from the French dram-
atic critics on account of being such,
a departure from the customary high-
ly involved and technical French
plots.
The dean concluded by saying that
"'' Ami Fritz,' is a play without a
doctrine, painting a beautiful, rustic
picture which is above all true to
life."
SIX NO VELTYACTS
.IN BAND BO1UNCE

Varied

Vaudeville to Feature VarsIty
Band Production
Tonight

QUARTETTE, 8 SAXOPHONES AN,1D
SKITS ARE FEW ATTRACTIONS
In addition to the numbers to bet
presented at 8 o'clock tonight in Hill
auditorium by the Varsity band in its
annual Band Bounce, there will be
six novelty acts, so varied that it will
also be somewhat of a vaudeville pro-
duction.
Frequent. rehearsals of the band
have been staged lately so that the
program to be offered tonight and at
the "Intercollegiate Day" in Detroit
will be as polished ai possible. Ef-
forts have been made to have the
theatrical talent of the campus wide-
ly represented.
Darling Quartette to Appear
"Alabama Jack" McKinney will give.
a one-man minstrel show, a new ver-
sion of black-face comedy. Manuel
=Wolner will demonstrate, the latest
quirks that he has mastered on the
violin. Following 'will be the well-.
known Darling quartette, rendering a
collection of the newest and fnost pop-
ular songs.,
It is rumored that "George Did It"
has suggested to "Sandy" Wilson and
"Rans" Sherman considerable mate-
rial for their "Much Foolishness" num-
ber. The ever-different antics of this
pair are expected to be better than
usual and to show them off at their
best. Tom Hart in "Sketches from
Life" will show in their true light'
many familiar campus personages. Un-
doubtedly the faculty will not be spar-
ed in this number.
Eight Saxophones Together
Concluding the program will be
Tommy Thomas' orchestra with a sax-
ophone octette, an assembly of differ-
ent types of instruments.'
Tickets for the performance tonight
will be sold on the campus, at the book
stores, and at the door.
LOCAL CHURCH DRIVE
- WILL COMMENCE SUNDAY

vention.
Several infiuential men from
side the University are schedule
speak, among. them Mr. Roy D.
pin, president of the Hudson T
Car Co.; Mr. Irving K. Pond,
tect of the Union, and Mr. Day
Little, Jr., graduate manager of
Harvard union.
To Give Questionnaire Resul
The whole meeting will be la
taken up with the discussions
will take place, but it is antici
that the Minnesota question
proposition will be of particula
terest. This plan includes the
ing of a questionnaire to all univ
unions and similar organizatior
the country, requesting informati
all phases of union activity. TI
suits accomplished will be repor
the Friday evening session.
Thursday morning, May 6, w:
taken up by the registration of
gates. The afternoon session w
called to order by the president
Michigan Union as chairman pro
pore. President Hutchins will
deliver the address of welcome.
Full Program Arranged
The program scheduled follow.
2:30 p. m.-"The Purposes
Union in the Activities of Instit
of Higher Learning," by Dean ,
M. Bates.
3:10 p. m.-"The Union as an I
ment for Wholesome Relaxatio
(See Number 1, Page Eight
MEN MAY ATTENE
"PATRICIA PASS
Tradition concerning the
Girls' play has been set aside by
Harry B. Hutchins, for men are
admitted to the out-of-town pe
ances.
"Patricia Passes" is to be pre
at Northern high school, Detr
2:15 o'clock on Saturday und(
auspices of the Detroit Associat
University of Michigan Womer
Special cars will take the c
players to Northern high school
a luncheon and an after-the-pe
ance supper will be served ther
Tickets for the Detroit perfor
may be purchased at Dean M
Jordan's office in Barbour gymi
for 50 cents.

i-
PLANS ,COMPLEO
FOR CON VENTIOF
FULL PROGRAM ARRANGE]
DELEGATES HERE MA'
6 TO 8
PRES. HUTCHINS TO
ADDRESS OF WELC
Chapin, Pond, and Little
Speakers; Minnesota to Re
on Questionnaire
Final plans for the conven
university unions have been c
ed. The three days from TI
afternoon, May 6, when Pi
Hutchins will deliver the add
welcome, until Saturday nigh
8, will be completely filled b
ness and social activities of t

ed tonight
work today
in Chicago
stock and
ioints were
ars of coal

51

Leroy Bur-
to be the
University
to an an-
University
banquet at
will talk
under the

Decide Freshman Status
The question of the standing of men'
having military credit was discussed
and it was decided that all men not
having at least 24 hours of credit not
including military credit must be
classed as freshmen on the campus.
The council took action on the mat-
ter of keeping the campus in condition
in the following res@lution: "Resolv-
ed-That the Student council goes on
record as heartily supporting the ac-
tion taken in urging the student body
to avoid walking across the campus
lawns." It was ;requested at the
meeting that councilmen make this a
personal matter by bringing violations
of this request to the attention of stu-
dents seen walking on the lawns, to
their attention in a friendly manner
as the student is seen doing this.
The committee on an events calen-
dar has drawn up a tentative calen-
dar for the coming college year,
which calendar will be published -s
soon as all the dates are definitelyi
settled.
DR. LAIDLER WILL SPEAK
BEFORE SOCIALIST SOCIETY
Harry W. Laidler, Ph.D., of New
York, will deliver a lecture on the
subject, "What of Reconstruction?"
at 8 o'clock Friday evening, in room
205 Mason hall.
Dr. Laidler, who comes here under
the auspices of the local chapter of
the Intercollegiate Socialist society,
is an author as well as a lecturer,
having recently published a book on
"Socialism in Thought and Action."
He last spoke in Ann Arbor in 1918.

services may .--
to May 9, be- The annual dance of the three sen-
ctions on the fr honorary societies, Barristers,
Vulcans, and Druids will be held in
retary of the Barbour gymnasium April 30. Owing
rsity of Min- to the fact it is a B. V. D. dance, the
n Ann Arbor affair will be formal.
nt at the ban- This dance has always been con-
sidered one of the leading social
events of the school year, according
>stponed to the committee and that body prom-
ans, the talk ises to surpass all records, making
rfman of the this year's dance an unusual success.
ras to have -_ _
ast night in Class Time Changed
ntercollegiate Mr. Steffin's class in Political sci-
m postponed ence 12 will meet at 2 instead of 7
ate to be an- o'clock today in room 104 Economics
building.

Beginning on Sunday, local curches
will Institute a drive to raise the local
budget of the Interchurch World
Movement. The campaign will last
during the*greater part of May, and
groups of volunteer, workers will go
to the several nearby counties to raise
the required funds.
The county conferences, which were
held in Ann Arbor last week, endeav-
ored to -carry down the educational
side of the movement to the church
workers, who will hear the message"
direct to their own congregations.
The local quota for Ann Arbor in the
campaign, has not as yet been given
out, but nationally $336,777,572 is to
be raised.

DR. FORSYTHE WILL SPEAK
TO PRESCOTT CLUB TONIG
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe of the
iversity Health service, will give
second of a series of talks on first
at 7:30 o'clock tonight in room
of ;he Chemistry building before
Prescott club, student pharmic org
ization.
V. Kraut, '21P, will talk on "Fa
the State Board." Important busi:
matters relative to arrangements
the All-Pharmic banquet and di
will also be taken up. This wil
an open meeting and refreshm
will be served.

Hill

Band

Bounce

Tickets at

um

TONIGHT

8

P. M.

Grahams, Wa
Hustons

rr r

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