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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 20, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UNIVERSITY .

:d every morning except Monday during the Univer-
the Board in Control of Student Publications.
WEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
sociated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
n of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
this paper and the local news published' therein.
at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ption by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard street.
Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.

on of
ed cori
will bi
ie DailI
in the
Vhat'sC
evening

ations not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the .sig-
cessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
ices of events will be published in 'the Daily at the
the Editor, if left at or mailed to ThenDaily office.
munications will receive no consideration. No man.
e returned unless the writer incloses postage.
y does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
ecommunications.
Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
g preceding insertion.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414

KG EDITOR.....................HARRY M. CAREY
ors-
Mark K. Ehlbert Edgar L. Rice
C. M. Campbell Joseph A. Bernstein
George Brophy Hugh Hitchcock
J. E. McManis
..H. Hardy Heth, Lee M. Woodruff
. .........Renaud Sherwood
tant.......................John I. Dakin
stant ...........................Brewster Campbell
.......................Robert C. Angell
Department..... .... .........Marguerite Clark
.Thomas Adams, Thornton Sargent Jr..

e Waldo
W~eber
Lanport
Barlow
h Vickery

Assistants
G. E. Clarke
Thomas 3. Whinery
R. W. Wrobleski
George Reinder
Dorothy Monfort
Minnie Muskatt
Harry B. Grundy

Winefred Biethan
Robert U. Sage
Marion Nichols
Frances Oberholtzer
Edna Apel
E. P. LovejOy
Charles Murchison
Russell Fletcher

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
NESS MANAGER..................PAUL E. CHOLETTE
tising................LeGrand A. Gaines, Mark B. Covell
s and Classified Ads..................HenryWhiting
ation..................... ...........Edward Priehs
Cation.............Curt P. Schneider, R.-A. Sullivan

the legitimate privileges of others who go there
with the main idea of getting' something to eat
and possibly spending a few minutes talking with
friends, the smaller number should be -unselfish
enough to give them an opportunity to use the
tables.
It is generally admitted that the tap room is
too small for the crowds that gather there on week
end nights and some time in the future it will
probably be enlarged, but until that time it can
be made to serve the greatest number only by each
individual considering the rights of his fellow stu-
dents.
ATTENDING FOREIGN UNIVERSITIES
It was jnteresting to note that out of the fifteen
scholarships awarded by the Society for Ameri-
can Fellowships in French Universities, that a
Michigan man was among the number for the
year 1920-1921. The movement advocating that
American students attend universities in other coun-
tries whenever possible has been growing steadily in
popularity.
This idea applies particularly to students desiring
to follow some special line of research work. How-
ever, the plan seems a good one for all students to
consider. France and America have much in cm-
mon, and an interchanging of ideas and thoughts
through the medium of students would be a splendid
means of strengthening this bond of fellowship. The
award of scholarships for 1921-1922 will be made
in the early part of the coming year. Michigan stu-
dents should give the matter due thought, as such
an opportunity is an enviable one.
PROFITEERING IN THE MOVIES
A down town movie theater recently, charged 55
cents admission for the following program: a very
ordinary farce, a series of news pictures, a series
of alleged jokes culled from the American press by
-some one whose sense of humor had evidently been
thoroughly extracted, and a society melodrama with
a fairly popular star. In this, the main feature, a
considerable part of the time was given to enabling
the audience to ponder over the subtitles, either on
the theory that they read English with difficulty or
that the subtitles were so good they could be reread
several times with pleasure. Neither theory was
right.
The result was a very. long and ,rery dull enter-
tainment at a high price.
'This is not the policy on which the movies built
up their prosperity. At the beginning 1o cents was
the admission price. No one imagined that movie
patrons went to a theater to read bad jokes. They
could read them for a penny in newspapers and in
some newspapers-The Tribune for instance-they
could read good ones. Movie managers assumed the
public wanted pictures 'of action and . they were
right. Also they assumed that patronage, down-
town, at least, was made up of people who wanted
to see something worth while in a reasonably short
time and get out. Again, we are sure, they were
right.
But the recent tendency has been to give less in
quality, more in time and to boost prices until they
are in sight of the regular' theater tariff.
Padding and profiteering are not going to pay in
the long run.-The Chicago Tribune
te Teelecope e

Roger Industrial

New Edition

F-r

DETROIT UNITED LINES
(Oct. 26, 19x9)
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern StandardaTime)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:ro a.
.n., and hourly to 9:10 p. M.;
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:o5 a. m., 9:05 a.
m. and every two hours to 9:o5 p. in., o:so
n. m. To Ypsilanti only, i r :pmin., 1 x
a. mn., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Ypsilanti,.
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. m. and
tn2:2 a. n.
AMERICAN UNIVERSITY UMION
TO AID AMERICAN TOURISTS
In a letter to President Harry B.
Hutchins, George E. MacLean, director
of the British division of the American
University Union in Europe, gives
some interesting information on the
work of the division in the interests
of tourists connected with American
universities.
One service which the office will try
to render will be the arranging of
lodgings for urf.nersity people coming
to England for ^A udy or pleasure.
These lodgings can be easily provid-
ed is arrangameni., are made in ad-
vance, but unless this is done the vis-
itor max be embarrassed, as London
is unusually crowded.
The Union will also be ready to
register travelers on their arrival, af-
ford a meeting place for them, handle
their mail, introduce them to British
learned societies, and act as an edu-
cational advisor to them.
The office also acts as a clearing
house for university information from
all nations, as the British and French
directories are, under the same roof.
The library containing this informa-
tion is beginning to be of much use,
according to Mr. MacLean.
Patronize our -Advertrserr.-Adv.

BOOKS- NOW ON,

IONmis

I

HAND

AT

! Haas and Hill-Chemistry of Plant Products
- Rogers-Manual of Industrial Chemistry-(New Ed.).........$7.50
: Jones-The Principles of Citizenship........................1.25
- Shaw-Approach to Business Problems .....................2.00
E Jones-Roman Empire...................................2.00
Conrad-Nigger of the Narcissus,...... ............ .... . 1.75
Conrad-Almayer's Folly............... ......... ..1.75
"IAMI FRITZ"-Souvenir Edition'......................... .60
-
= r
U NIVERSITY
=WVMEU BOOKSTORES

TWO
STORES

GR A HAM'S
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK
"George Did It"

TWO
STORES

I

APRIL
S M T WTF S
1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 .15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 .
Men-Hats are high; your last
season's hat cleaned and re-
blocked into this season's shape,
with a new band, will look like
new and save you five or ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

-i tt111111 111in111t11111t1l t11111h111i11gi
Lunches
Sodas
Candies
SSUGAR BOWL
109 S. MAIN ST
rlilltilu N Int111111111111111111I111

Assistants'
V. Lambrecht F. M. Heath,
rt O..Kerr . Sigmund Kunstadter
. Gower Harold Lindsay
James T. Rawlings

D. P. Jyce
Robt. Sommerville
Arthur L. Glazer
Lester W. Millard

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
eof The Daily should see the night editor who a~ full charge
[1 news to be printed that night.
Phe night editors for this week will be: Monday
ht, Chessei- Campbell; Tuesday night, Edgar
e; Wednesday night, Hugh Hitchcock; Thurs-
night, George Brophy; Friday night, Mark
bert; Saturday night, Joseph A. Bernstein.
he Editor announces today the appointment of
e. McManis, '21; to the position of night edi-
Charles Murchinson, '22, and Russell Fletcher,
to the editorial board, and Harry B. Grundy,
Almena Barlow, '22, and Elizabeth Vickery,
to the reportorial staff. B. G. Gower, '22, and
ter B. Millard, '21E, have been appointed to the
ness staff by the Business Manager.
TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 1920.
There will be a meeting of the entire reportorial
f and tryouts at 5 o'clock this- afternoon.
WE'RE BEHIND THE ALUMNI
Never before in the history of the University has
re been such a feeling of co-operation among the
mni to help Michigan retain her reputation as one
America's great universities. "
['his general movement, which is spreading to
erever men of Michigan congregate, is only ex-
plified by the "Michigan Week" that is being
d in Detroit April 19 to 24 by the Detroit Alumni
ociation, one of the strongest and most loyal
anizations of the University. Everything pos-
e is being done to create Michigan spirit.
among the affairs will be the luncheon at the
tIer hotel Saturday noon followed 'by attend-
:e at the ball game at Navin field. It is expected
the committee in charge that 8o alumni and
dents of the University will attend the luncheon.
block of I,ooo seats have been reserved at the
l game for Michigan men.
the students of the University must help the
mni in their work. One way of doing this is by
nding such functions as have been arranged for
urday.
THE TAP ROOM PRIVILEGE
)id you ever drop into the Union tap room about
o'clock on a Friday or Saturday night to get
iething to eat and meet some of your friends?
d were you able to find a seat or a table where
could-sit down while eating your food? Prob-
r not.
the designers of the tap room had in mind a
ce where the students could get together and
t their friends in something the same way they
d to do at Joe's and Larry Damm's. The tap
n has surely filled all expectations as a stu-
t gathering place but there are many who
se this privilege and hold the tables all even-
while others are compelled to go elsewhere or
id while eating. Many of the men who stay
-e all evening come for the purpose of being
rtained by others, which in itself is defeating
of the fundamental ideas of the tap room,
ch was that the students could entertain them-.
es by a sort of community singing and by
romptu turns at the piano.
)n week end nights or any other nights when the
room is not crowded the room makes a good
for informal card games and discussion
ups, but when these activities interfere with

g

REAL Camping in the REAL Woods
.Hunting, Fishing and Canoe Trips
- -- , , .9 -
with Indian Guides in the Won- .
derful Timagami Country

i..,

,I;

I

CALL 652-M AFTER 7:30 P. M.

I

-I

rS
.:,
i

F OR real enjoyment
and delight, one box-
of Murads is worth a
dozen packages of
ordinary cigarettes" that
merely smoke."

tt I

"Tell me, mother, tell your daughter,
Tell me truly, do not scoff;
Tell me if you think I -oughter
Take this fur coat off."

Murads are Pure Turkish!
100%

A Kazoo Reader Unblushingly Sponsors This One
"What was your impression of the' cyclone which
hit here a little while back ?"
- "Why, at first I was quite carried away with it."
Where Shall We, Find Our Teachers?-Recent
news head.'
Ask us something hard. You'll find them in Ypsi
on the sofa any time after 8 in the evening.
Heard in the Library
First stude-Got a steady job now, Jack?
Second ditto-I sure have. I'm waiting to get a
book.
Dear Noah: - -Y
Is it permissable to say "He bit off more than he
could chew?" Ima 'Kohed.
No, Ima, no college girl should use that expres-
sion. What you should say is, "He severed with his
incisors more than he could masticate with his
molars."
Boy, Page Simon Legree
Manager-You say you played a leading role in
"Uncle Tom's Cabin."
Applicant-Yes, sir. I'm the one who led in the
dogs.
The Original Contortionist
Mrs. Nancarrow looked at Camilla with Mi-
chael's eyes and brow, but she spoke with a differ-
ent mouth. -Cosmopolitan Magazine.
Heard at the Opera
He-Say, he don't look good in nothing.
She-You should say he looks good in nothing.
He-No, that ain't what I mean.
Famo-us Closing Lines
"Ha, a shining example of industry," he mut-
tered as he gazed at the busy bootblack.
NOAH COUNT.

buy a package
ofMurads. If you
are not more
than satisfied,
return half' the
package to us
and get all y ur
money back.
We are not
afraid to make
this offer -
MURADS ARE
TURKISH -the
world's most
famous tobacco
for cigarettes.
Judge for
yourself-!
itam o' thr'ft 1GudQeTrkls.&
:.mdFgpm iJryrvttes mr heW f

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