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April 20, 1920 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-20

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DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 1920.

N
PRIGS 'THREE C

PRCETRE

l TEAM
I EVEN ON
:5 IN SOUTH

WIN THREE,
AND TIE ONE
N TOUR

LOSE

NG OF CAPTAIN
KS FEATURES TRIP
Entertained Royally by All
hools Played During
Vacation
rs varsity baseball team re-
sterday, from its spring
rip in the south. Coach
and Captain Parks have an-
he trip as a decided success
ays than one. The percont-
in based on the record of
)ies, three defeats, and one'
a fair indicator of the bene-
from' contests with crack
niies.
di Weather Conditions
Parks and his teammates
turned in the best condition
a healthy sunburn, the re-
air efforts in the hot south-
The Wolverines were fav-
ood weather and were able
e their schedule in the or-
been arranged. Kentucky
pn fell before the Wolver-
in the opening game by the
to 3. Parls, Ruzicka and
were Iichiggnus battery
at contest.
, Polytechnic presented the
opposition encountered and
to scope a tie and a win in
a.mes -at Auburn. The first
lted in a 1 to 1 tie when the
called at the end of the
ie following afternoon Ala-
stered two runs on an er-
ninth and were able to

CAPTAIN PAkR4
LOCAL FACTORIES
TO RESUME WORK

Ann Arbor iidutrialC Cneeris
With bnited Number
At Werk

start I

ess before Parks'
isy victim, 2 to 0,
iter at Athens.
e Georgians were
- end of a 6 to 3
d Saunders hurl-
he Wolverines di-
i Vanderbilt, los-
zicka and Karpus
3 score and win-
when Parks held

aking of the tour Coach Lund-
i great stress on the improve-
team work and condition of
men. Hitting was fair and
. to improve if the later games
n as an indication. Knode,
Jewell, and Kirchgessner were
iest hitters and were able to
at opportunemomients. Mike
ith a 'ighe run, three bag-
. single in Paturday's game
most spectacular of the bat-
ptain Parks go the pitching
The little leader of the Wolv-
itehed a total of 25 innings
'hich time he held his oppon-
;wo runs and six hits. Saun-
Ruzicka were not in the best
. To Karpus belongs the hon-
ng the most versatile of the
In the game against Vander -
ay with six runs against his
e Number 1, Page Six)
ISI? WILL NOT
5[1 SAYS PARDON
NTENI)ENT SETTLES RUN-
IJAT GOAL SHORTAGE
RUT RELAY OPENING
Iniversity is in no danger of
tl!eugh lclck pf coal," said
C. Pardon, superintendent of
and grounds committee,
it@rviewed yesterday. "We
9 tons on hand now and have
thousand more tons on the
is coal is now in Toledo and
y be moved since the switch-
rike is nearly broken."
tatement puts an end to the
rhich was prevalent on the
yesterday to the effect that

EDISON CO1PANY WILL SUPPLY
40 PER CENT OF NORIAL POWER
The Detroit Edison power plant,
which~ was closed by the industrial
tie-up thereby forcing the shutting
down of local concerns, will re-open
this morning. Approximately 1,000
people will go back to wogr in Anil
Arbor factories. By the end of the
week Ann Arbor industrial plants ex-
pect to have all their workmen back,
and will resume their regular amount
of production.
Will Supply 40 Per Cent of Power
Starting this morning, the Edison
company will supply 40 per cent of
their normal power to their customers.
The various local factories are expect-
ed to take back varying percentages
of their workmen, beginning today.
With approximately 60 per cent of
their normal forces, the gotor ro -
ucts company will resume ro u i n
immediately.
The Amerin Prpafh and Machne
company haq not felt the effects Af the
decrease in ppwer, as i has been op-
erating under its own power for some
time. All of the workers of the ioov-
er Steel Ball company are mpeoted to
go back to work this morning, atd the
other factories whieb have been shut
down during the strike, are planning.
to re-open shortly.
Expect Full Power Soon
As soon as the Edison company re-
ceives a sufficient supply of coal, it
will continue operations at full pow-
er. Now that the back of$e s ike
has been virually broken, thg oincials.
>f the Edison eompany are hopefil that
they will operate at full .ower very
soon. However, the date at whioci the
company will resumep normal produc-
tion of power depends upon the sup-
ply of coal that they are able 0 ac-
quire.
ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR SUM ER
SESSION IRAIY FO1 USE
Official announcements for the Sum-
mer session are now ready for distri-
bution and may be prgeired at the
office of the registrar or the office of
the Summer session, accorftng to a
statement by Dead E. H. 1(rans q9 that
department, yesterday,
Registrar Hall Honored at Conference
Registrar Arthur G, Hall returned
the latter part of last week from
Washington where he attended a three
day conference of registrars of Amer-
ican universities. Registrar Hall was
re-elected vice-president pf the asso-

"GEORGE 010 IT"
TOUR BIG SUCCESS
Enthusiastic Audiences Greet 1920
Union Opera in Every
City
ESTIMATE NET RECEIPTS AT
$3,00; 15,000 SEE SHOW
"The tour of 'George Did It' has
been the most successful tour that
a Union opera has ever taken, both
financially and from the standpoint
of the enthusiastic way in which it
was received by the alumni in all the
cities played," stated Homer Heath,
general secretary of the Union, yester-
day in commenting on the opera trip.
Although definite figures have not
been compiled yet, it.is estimated that
15,000 people saw theshow while it
was enroute and that the net re-
ceipts will run about $3,000 for the
tour alone. Last year the opera net-
ted $46 on it's tour.
Flint First Stop
The special train of three Pullman
cars and- a baggage car left Ann Ar-
bor Monday morning, April 1I, for
Flint in a heavy snow storm, It wa%
expected that bad weather might ef-
fect the turnout in Flint but upon ar-
rival there it vas found that the S. R.
0. sign was already hung out at the
Majestic theater. The m were en-
tertained by the alumni at the Dryden
club during the afternoon. Whatever
feelijng of trepidation that was felt
early in the evening by members of
the cast regarding their first road ap-
pearance was soon dispelled by the
enthusiastic manner in which the first
numbers of the show were received.
Many of the things which failed to get
over very heavily in Ann Arbor
brught laugh after laugh from the
audience-in fact this was the case in
every town. Each song and dance
number received encores until the men
ran out of verses or were too tired to
dance any longer. The management
of the Majestic theater declared that
it was the largest house the theater,
had ever had. After the show a dancej
was given at the Dryden club which
lasted until 2:30 o'clock, the trainE
eaving for Sagihiw at 4 o'clock.
3,900 ee show giSgcaw ,
Headquarters in Saginaw were at
the Saginaw club and after the show
was given in the Auditorium. Dur-
ing the afternoon a dance was held in,
the Sagniaw club and after the show
that night another was given in tiw
Auditorium. It is estimated that 3,0001
people witnessed the Tuesday night
performance which was one of the
best given on the road.
The Battle Creek stand ran up
against a rival attracpon *n te fo
of a Rotaria con ven i
being held tre. As a result the Post
theater wys gt quite fille Wednes-
day night and audience was arggly
composed 0f gge. pg n arrival In
Battle Qr@4 the Alen were taken t
the Athestan club fqr l iich, IFPi4
request of the anagement of the
Rotarian convention the company
went ever to the theater during the
(ee Number 3, Page Six)
Wolverine TrackI
Star Bothe red T y
Straied Tf do00
Capt. Carl Johnson of the Michg
track team will be unable t compete

on the cindery f r. several weeks. The
strained tendon whi h the WilveriueI
star sustained j st previoUs to the
Cornell meet is still bothering him.
Dr. abot of the M\edical achool, is,
taking care of Jghpan s injiry. Atl
present Dr, ()bot eannot tell howv
ong Carl will be laid up, but will knowi
more de nttely after the Michigan
captain has reted ao@pl@ of weeks.
HONORARY CHEMICAL SOCIETY
INITIATES TWLVE MEMBERS
Phi Lambda Upsilon honorary chem-
ioal society; initiated 12 new members
Friday evening before vacation. Thei
new members elected are E. W. Ge-r
niesse, W. H. Rising, A. B. Soule, and
A. F. Wendler, who are graduates, and1
T. C. Simpson, '20E, W. L. Fink, '21E,
J. W. Kennedy, '21E, 0. W. 4Ic1ui-
lan, '21E, H. S. Shlrpgan, '21$, Q. Q.
Fuss, '21E, and L. 0. Anderson, x21.x
The initiates were given a banquet1
Sturday vening at the Union,

DETROIT MICHIGAN
WEEK UNDER WAY
Presentation of Union Opera Saturday
Night Well Received by
Audience
FURTHER PLANS INCLUDE BAND
BOUNCE AND BASEBALL GAME
Michigan Week is now in full swing
in Detroit, with a program full of pep
and interest for all Michigan students
and alumni, under the auspices of the
University of Michigan club of that
city.
With success attending their plans
for the first part of the program,,the
members of the club may justly lay
claim to a gala week of celebration.
A teachers' institute meeting was held
on Friday afternoon, April 16, which
was the opening event of the week,
and meetings held in the various high
schools and the chamber of commerce
building were addressed by members
of the University faculty the same
day.
Give Banquet for Pres. Hutchins
A farewell banquet was tendered to
President Harry B. Hutchins on Fri-
day evening in the Chamber of Com-
merce building, at which Detroit al-
umni had their last opportunity of hon-
oring President Hutchins in his official
capacity as head of the University.
Members of the "George Did It"
cast presented their opera in Orches-
tra Hall, Saturday evening, April 17,
giving to Detroiters the opportunity
to see the play which met with such
pronounced successes in Ann Arbor
and in others cities of the state. The
audience received the production with
enthusiastic encores and continued
applause. Following the perform-
ance, a supper and dance was held at
the Hotel Statler,
Intercollegiate Day Saturday
"Intercollegiate Day," Saturday,
April 24, promises to be the biggest
day of the celebration. Arrangements
have been made for the reservation of
a large section of seats at Navin field
for the afternoon, when the Detroit
and Chicago American teams will
cross bats.
The Varsity Band Bounce and con-
cert will be presented Saturday eve-
ning in Orchestra Hall, with a mus-
ical program by the Varsity band, a
large jazz orchestra, and local vaude-
ville-actors. Following the perform-
ance, the University of Michigan club1
of Detroit has arranged an after-thea-
ter supper and dafice in the dining
room on the main floor of the Eo e
Statler, which wigl brin t a cls§ the
Michigan e elebratie
NNOUNCE PROGRAM FOR
BAND BOUNCE THURSDAY
WOLNEB, WILSON, SHERMAN, Mc-
KINNEY, AND THE DARLINGS
WILL TAKE PART
With a novel program of jazz, vaude-
ville and violin numbers, the Versty
Band Bounce and concert will be pre-
sented Thursday evening, April 22, in
Hill audot iotI.
Selections will be offered by the'
complete Yarity Band, while popular
songs of the day will be rendered by '
10 piece jazz orchestra, featuring a
saxaphone sextette. Manuel Wolner,
'22, who has appeared in previous con-'
certa, will play the violin, and vocal

numbers will be furnished by the Dar-
ling brothers' quartette.
The versatile "Sandy" Wilson, '20,
who recently made a hit in "George
Did It," will appear with "Ranse"
Sherman, '23, in a vaudeville skit.
Negro impersonations will be given by
"Alabama Jack" McKinney, in his own
sketch, "Deep Dark Stuff."
HEALTH LECTURES TO FRESH
GYMNASIUM CLASSES BRGIN
As a continuation of the required
gymnasium work for first-year men,
a series of health lectures has been
arranged, beginning with today and
lasting for three weeks. The lectures,
which will be given by. Dr. Warren E.
Forsythe, of the University health
service, will be held in the Natural
Science auditorium, classes meeting
there at their regular gymnasium
hours;

TULANE WILL PLAY
WOLVERINES OCT. 30
Tulane university of New, Orleans
will meet Michigan on the Ferry field
griiron October 30. The announce-
ment of this game was made by Mr.
Bartelme yesterday.
According to Mr. Bartelme the Uni-
versity has wanted to schedule a
southern team for some time and he
believes that Michigan is fortunate in
securing Tulane, which is considered
one of the best institutions in the
South. This game will be the first one
in which the Wolverines have played
a southern team since the days when
Michigan used to play Vanderbilt an-
nually.
The Tulane game is the seventh
one to be arranged for the 1920 foot-
ball season, thus filling out a well-
balanced schedule.
ALUMNI BNQE
PRESI HUTCHINS
More Than 500 Students and Alumni
Attend Detroit Function for
Retiring Executive
MAYOR COUZENS, FRANK CODY
AND GRADS GIVE ADDRESSES
Glowing tributes to Pres. Harry B.
Hutchins featured the banquet given
to the retiring president last Friday
evening in Detroit at the Board of
Commerce building, at which between
500 and 600 Michigan alumni and stu-
dents gathered to honor him.
Mayor Couzens Speaks
Mayor Couzens of Detroit headed the
list of speakers 'and gave a congratu-
latory address to President Hutchins,
lauding his services to the Univer-
sity. Mrs. Vera Burridge Baits, '15,
spoke on "Feminism" and Frank D.
Eamon, '00, and Frank Cody, superin-
tendent of the Detroit public schools,
also gave talks, with Fred G. Dewey,
'02, as toastmaster.
President Hutchins on behalf of the
Detroit alumni presented George S.
Hodges with a watch and chain for
conspicuous bravery in the world war.
Dean John R. Effingr gave an ac-
count of the rescue by Hodges of a
fellow naval aviator in the open sea
when the unfortunate pilot's plane
was enveloped in flames. Hodges res-
cued the man by landing near the
edge of the flames and swimning to
the plane under wat",
A bi3iliaut usieal program was
furnished by a quartette composed of
George Becker, '16, Russell Allman,
grad, Waldo Fellows, '14, and Ed-
ward Kemp, '12. Other musical num-
bers were furnished by Chase Sikes
and William Holand, formerly head
of the School of Music. . Many splen-
did tributes were paid to President
Hutchins for the great work he has
accomplished while head of the Uni-
versity.
A A rborHi ty
ShortageOf Gas
during Holidays
Ann Arbor has been hit by the gas
oline shortage prevalent all over the
state and as a result of the use Sat-
urday of 7,500 of the 1.8,000 gallons in
the city, the authorities prohibited the
sale of the fluid except by permit giv-
en out by the city. '

Gasoline was refused to all but cars
considered absolutely necessary to the
public and until late Monday morning
all passenger cars were refused. How-
ever Monday, on the expectation of a
supply of two tank cars the city al-
lowed five gallons to each car. Fail-
ure of these cars to arrive will ne-
cessitate the enforcement of the orig-
inal restriction. '
Various subterfuges were attempt,
ed by the people to get gasoline in-
cluding sickness, milk-less babies and
other causes for the immediate use of
an automobile. Others hearing that
Wayne had a plentiful supply, took a.
load of empty cans and went there for,
their supply.
Sphinx Hold Meeting Tonight
An important meeting of Sphinx
will be held at 7:15 o'clock tonight
in room 306 of the Union. Special
work in ,connection with Michigan
Week in Detroit will be discussed at
this meeting..

THREAT OF NE
STRIKE MENIAL

REPRESENTATIVES OF
~ YARDMEN COMPLAI
Railroad Board Refuses to Hear Pie
for Higher Wages; Men Must
Work, Says Body
Chicago, April 19.-John Grunt
president of the Chicago yardmen's a
sociation, was taken to the county j
today by Federal officers after he h
refused to give $10,000 bond on
charge of violating the Lever act A
which he as arrested last Thursd
with 24 other strike leaders. Fedet
officers said Grunau had violated i
promise to remain away from uni
meetings.
Issue Warrants
Following the issuance of new wa
rants for 10 strike leaders. District-A
torney Cline indicated that 25 othe
would be served on men who succee
ed to the offices vacated by the stril
leaders under arrest.
While the railroads announced t
day that traffic conditions in Chicag
were approaching normal, a new me
ace came in the form of a stil
threat fdom 35,000 freight 'handlers a
railroad clerks. If their demands f
increased wages are not met, a stril
vote will be taken, according to of
cers of the railroad clerks' union..
Men Hold Meeting
A meeting of heads of the new yar
men's association from strike cente
throughout the country was held t
day, but no announcement was giv
of action taken. The session was cal
ed by Grunau for considering 9p5
for continuing the strike, but Grunt
was unable to attend.
Washington, April 19.-Undeterr
by the refusal of the railroad boa
to hear them today, representatives
the railroad strikers announced th
they would present written complain
together with demands for "a livi
wage" to the board which- tomorro
will begin formal hearing of the wa
controversy.
Board Bars Strikers
The board politely declined "to r
ceive, entertain, or consider eomplain
,from strikers," declaring it would on
hear those who were adopting evel
reasonable means of restoring rairo
service.
The board will proceed with the rail
road wage dispute involving clainis
nearly 2,000,000 men which failed e
adjustment when the bi-partisan boa
ceased to function April 1. Timot
Shea, president of the Brotherhood
Railroad Firemen and Enginemen, sa
tonight that speedy settlement wou
be urged. Refusal of the board
(See Number 3, Page Six)
BEGIN INTENSIVE woRK
ON MASQUE'S 1020 PU0
PROFESSOR NELSON PREDICI
SUCCESS FOR "THE NEW
Intensive rehearsals for Masqu
annual play, "The New Lady Ba:
tock," will begin today. With on
three weeks left before the present
tion on May 12 and 13, both afternot
and night practices will be held.
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, the direct
expressed himself as being well plea
ed with the progress already made
the first three weeks of work befo
vacation. "With three weeks left f
intensive work," he said, "this p
will no doubt have the same finish th

'Quality Street' was noted for la
year."
The author, Jerome K. Jerome, a
so wrote "The Passing of the Thi
Floor Back." "The New Lady Ba
tock," according to Professor Nelso
has been well received wherever
has been played.
The performances will be held
Sarah Caswell Angell hall and will
open to the general public.

FREIGHT
MAY

HANDLERS AND
GO OUT FOR me
PAY

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