100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 10, 1920 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, APRIL 10, 1920.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TH REE

SAUDYARL10 90 PAG Tltt? HE. 1 MICHIGAN DAILY

PRESENT HOP RESULT
Of LONG DEVELOPMENT
JUNIOR BALL THE FORERUI'NNER
OF FUNCTION AS SEEN
THIS YE1R
(By Rupert W. Wrbleski)
If Mr. Michigan Graduate, '78,nwere
here tonight to witness the holding of
the greatest social event on the Wolv-
erine campus, at which some thousand
odd terpsichorean devotees are whirl-
ng over the urnished floor of Water-
man gymnasium, his comment would
naturally be-"How the Junior Ball
has changed!"
40 at First Hop
Mr. Michigan Graduate, '78, you
must remember, was one of the 40
guests who attended Michigan's first
Junior Hop in 1877. When first given
by members of the Junior class in
"Hank's" emporium on Main street, it
was'christened the "Junior Ball." Two
voilins and a piano seemed sufficient
to provide music for the 20
couples attending. The decorations
consisted of a few strips of maize and
blue bunting which would shrink far
into the background in comparison
with the elaborate color scheme
adopted this year. Weil might he of,
the class of '78 wonder were he in
Waterman gymnasium on this night
of J-Hopping.
Control Changes Hands
For four years after Mr. Michigan
Graduate, '78, left the cloistered walls
of Ann Arbor, the Junior class con-
tinued to give Hops at "Hank's." The
Greek letter societies assumed control
of the event under the name of the
"Society Hop." In 1883 the Juniors
again took charge of the dance and
promptly called it the "Junior Social."
Sailing under various aliases, the
dance became more important as time
elapsed and the University grew. The
affair was run by the Junior class and
fraternities intermittently for the next
10 years. Some 300 persons crowded
into the Rink to attend the annual
function in 1891. For the first time
there were two orchestras, the pro-
gram consistnig of waltzes, polkas,
galops and shottisches. But by now
the accommodations were far from
ample, and the gentlemen were ad-
vised by the committee not to wear
silk hats because of insufficient stor-
age space.
From 1892-94, Granger's dancing
academy was the scene of the "Junior
Social," the dance lasting from 9 to 1
o'clock, with a charge of $1.00 per
couple. This was in 1894, it must be
remembered.
Becomes "Annual Ball"
Under the name of the "Annual
Ball," the function was first given in
Waterman gymnasium by nine liter-
ary fraternities in 1895. The use of
the gymnasium not oly priveded
added facilities, but also enabled the
committees to develop the programs
and decorations to a much greater
degree. At this stage the two-step re-
placed the old-fashioned dances.
Under the control of the Junior
classes again, electrical effects first
played a prominent role in the decor-
ation scheme of the J-Hop held in
1901. Long festoons of electric lights
were installed from the dome of the
hall to the running track. Five years
later calcium spotlights were intro-

duced, which were made to sweep the
floor, producing colorful effects on
gorgeous gowns and decorations.
No Hop in '14
The Hop was not held in 1914, but
a year later it burst out again in a
veritable blaze of glory. It was again
discontinued in 1917 because of war
conditions. In 1916 the J-Hop reached
the height of its popularity and Bar-
hour gymnasium had to be thrown
open to accommodate the increased
number of guests. The same arrange-
ments were used tonight.
The forty odd years which cover the
history of the J-Hop saw the evolu-
tion of the affair from a dance, in the
merest sense of the word, to Michi-
gan's greatest social event that stands
out equally as well as one of the
eminent affairs in American universi-
ties. Tonight witnesses the 1921 J-'
Hop riding on the crest of successful
occasions of other years with the
greatest attendance in the history of
the affair.

JIA"tYARD PROFSORS EATO
As a result of the Harvard endow-
ment fund campaign, the governing
boards of the university have been able
to draw up a new scale of salaries
for the teaching staff, from 40 to 50
per cent higher than the old rate of
compensation, accompanied by a
change in the .ystem of academic
promotion. The new salary scale is to
go into effect on Sept. 1, 1920
Sees All, Knows
All, Hears All,
OuijaTells All
(By It. E. B.)
If there were something that you
wanted to know most desperately
wouldn't you try and find it out? Of
course, any sensible person would.
Newspapers far and wide have
spread gossipy stories of co-ed versus
ouija board-and people all over have
made scathing remarks about what the
girls came to college for, etc.
Well it's this way-
A group of lovely, laughing, dishev-
eled maidens were sitting in their
budoir wearied from the labors of the
day. (The scene of this is any sor-
ority house-and the day's occupation
has been a class in Creative listening
or Tropical fruits). But there is
something even more wearying than
the strenuous ordeal which they have
been through and that is a great ques-
tion which is tearing down their whole
mental organism.
"I must know. It can stand it no
longer It is cruel to keep me in
suspense!" and one of these beautiful,
but distressed, maidens threw herself
down and burst into unconquerable
sobbing.
The rest followed suit and soon the
rosm was damp with tears. This was
dangerous on account of the recent
epidemic of flu-and the girls realized
that something must be done and that
quickly. Higher powers would have
to be called in. The spirit world
alone could answer. A ouija board
stood in the corner-their question
could be solved!
They did not have to question it, for
long residence in the college atmos-
phere had trained this board to an-
ticipate their queries. It quickly
spelled out sans hesitation-
Y-O-U -W-I-L-L -B-E -I-N-V-I-T-
E-D---T-O-T-H-E-J-H-0-P.
Everybody cheered up amazingly,
the room dried up, and the girls dis-
cussed evening clothes until the early
morning.
As They View It
Once It's Over
(By 0G. 0. B.)
The Girl: "Gee, but my feet are
The Fellow: "I guess I'll be a club-
man the rest of the year. They say
they roll their own."
The Chaperone: "Plo hum, I wish
that these foolish young people knew
enough to go to bed."
The Faculty: "Well I'm through
with this kind of business for another
year."
Dr. May: "This dancing in my
gymnasium is an outrage. Why the
building would blush with shame, it
it could."
The Maicurist: "I'll have to get

all of my instruments sharpened aft-
er working on all those men last
week."
The Barber: "This last raise in
prices was very opportune."
The Modiste: "It's a good thing I
can charge for my creative designs.
The amount of goods in this year's
gowns wouldn't bring much."
The Tailor: "I'm glad this was not
a military hop."
Doc and Smuck: Business of rub-
bing hands and smiling.
The Taxi Driver: "I sold my car
ten times tonight, and it is still with
me."
The Florist: "'Say it with flowers
is a good motto,' but its a good thing
some of these flowers I sold can't
talk."
TheGirls who did not go: They all
had to rush home for a big party Sat-
urday night."
Father, when he gets the bill:
" " Censored.

BRITAIN HAs NO WARM
WICDME FOR CERMANS
DEPORTEDII TIUTOIS REUIRN1NG
TO ENGLAND POORLY
RECEIVED
London, April 9.- Large numbers
of German and other undesirables
who wet's deported frtttnRgland in
the war have masaged to sake their
way back to London but have en-
countered warm receptions when
their identity has been discovered.
They managed to cross from the con-
tinent by working thseirvay as sailors
on tramp steamers to northern Eng-
lish and Scottish ports.
These Germans who have come back
to England to take up business again
find it a hard ro'a to hoe, says the
Evening Standard. One German busi-
ness man gave it up and returned to
his Fatherland after being refused ad-
mission to five London hotels. Be
found rooms in a Bloomsbury board-
ing house but two days later the other
boarders discovered him, and notified
the manager they could not live under
the same roof with a German; and he
was turned out.
A German butcher in a London
suburb was prevented by his neighbors
from reopening his old store the
other day although he had lived in
England for 40 years, and there are
many similar cases.
Neither captain nor crew of the
steamer Spica, the first German cargo
ship to enter the Firth of Forth since
August, 1914, was allowed ashore at
Methil and, in deference to local feel-
ing, the vessel did not display the
German flag.
On the other hand, a revival of
"Tannhauser" at Covent Garden Opera
recently drew a crowded and appre-
ciative audience of society people.
The cast, however, was wholly Eng-
lish.
SUMME R SESSION OFFERS
SPECIAL MEDICAL LECTURES
There will be a series of six lec-
tures ona medical subjects during the
Summser sesion. Dean Kraus, of the
Sumser session, says that they will
be of general interest to all who may
attend.
The lectures will be delivered by
Dean Victor C. Vaughan, Dr. Cabot,
Dr. Warthin, Dr. Barrett, Dr. Parnall,
and Dr. Van Zwaluwenburg.
The Daily contains the latest Asso-
elated Press News.-Adv.

* *a
* Footwear of Quality and Distinction
REPUTATION
DERIVED FROM QUALITY LINGERS. INFINITELY
LONGER IN YOUR MEMORY THAN PRICE. RUBY
FOOTWEAR COSTS MORE THAN MANY OTHER
MAKES, BUT THERE ARE THESE BED-ROCK REA-
SONS-QUALITY, STYLE, SERVICE.
CHICA0() DETROIT
ANNARBOR MADISONq
FOR
HIGH-CLASS PHOTOPLAYS.
VISIT
WUERTH and ORPHEUM
THEA TRES .
HIGH-CLASS VAUDEVILLE
-AT -
THE FORUM THEATRE
YPSILANTI
Every Friday and Saturday

_I

i

PHONE ORDERS MAIL ORDERS
PROMPTLY FILLED PROMPTLY FILLED

Newest Conceits .for Spring
and "conceit" is just the word to be applied to these Spring
Modes. These frocks whether of tricotine, taffeta, sain, or georgette,
show a penchant for ruffles, overskirts and frills -- anything to belie
the severity of last season.
Our store is resplendent with frocks in street dresses of wool
jersey, tricotine and serge, and charming afternoon dresses of taffeta
satin and georgette. You will fall in love with these new models for
their differentness and becomingness.
We also are showing Spring Models in Suits and Coats.

FASHION PARLORS
(SECOND FLOOR)

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan