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April 04, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wan

41-111

'ICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
'OF MICHIGAN
hed every morning except Monday during the Univer-
>y the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the, use for
on of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
i this paper and the local news published therein.
ed at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ter.
ription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
s: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard street.
n: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
unications not to exceed 30o words, if signed, the sig-
t necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
notices of events will be published) in The Daily at the
of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily' office.
communications will receive no consideration. No man-
il be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
Sthe communications.
t's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
eing preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
'IG EDITOR.'..................HARRY M. CAREY
ors-
Mark K. Ehlbert . Edgar L. Rice
C. M. C ampbell Joseph A. Bernstein
George Brophy Hugh Hitchcock
.......... .H. Hardy Heth, Lee M. Woodruff
.-...yH......Renaud Sherwood
stant ..............................John I. Dakin
stant ...........................Brewster Campbell
......... ...Robert C. Angell
Department.......... .............Marguerite Clark
. Thomas Adams, Thornton Sargent Jr.

Assistantsx
cG. L. Clarke
Thomas J. Whinery
ldo R. W. Wrobleski
°dr George Reindel
ort Dorothy Monfort
Minnie Muskatt

Winefred Biethan
Robert D. Sage
Marion Nichols
Frances Oberholtzer
Edna Ape1
E. P. Lovejoy

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
MANAGER...............PAUL E. CHOLETTE
.....LeGrand A. Gaines, Mark B. Covell
Classified Ads............ ......Henry Whiting
. ... . .............Edward Priehs
.................. .Curt P. Schneider, R. A. Sullivan

Assistants
F. M. Heath
Sigmund Kunstadter
Harold Lindsay -

D. P. Joyce
Robt. Sommerville
Arthur L. Glazer

s wishing to secure information concerning news for any
e Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
to be printed that night.
ght editors for the week will b'e : Mark K.
Monday .night; Hugh Hitchcock, Tuesday
dgar L. Rice, Wednesday night; George
Thursday night; Chesser Campbell, Fr-
t; Joseph Bernstein Saturday night..
SUNDAY, APRIL 4, 1920.
EASTER
in popular conception, is usually advert
a parade. Then, say the comic supple-
d the cynics, we promenade not for health
vanity; and sit in church more like pea-
an worshipers. We are told the day is a
for the physicians, because we take spring
ifor granted in picking the texture of our
r the extent of our decollete. To judge by
age bromide on the subject, Poiret must
>atron saint we worship today, and the
lbbit and easter egg our only symbols of
icance. .
e world laughs back at the scoffers, and-
enjoying Easter in the good old way. To
:ruth, no event more wholely reflects the
the occasion which gave it birth than does
s we observe it. It stood from the first
-birth and re-consecration to better ideals
er deeds; this spirit we "recognize every-
nd symbolize it even in the discarding of
ents and the donning of the radiant new.
ar.ance of growing things, the coming of
and beauty of summer, the warmth and
for which we have been longing, seem
to g6 inseparably, hand in hand,. with
of Easter; so that, even if we do catch
n too hasty private weather-prophesies, it
11 only because we have caught the optim-
forward look, which characterizes'the
the day.
ection - of new ideals, and new ambi-
I new faith; and happiness in the things
loing, and the things we hope to do -
for all time, the true meaning of Easter.
LE QUARTETTE ,REPRESENTING
MICHIGAN
Glee club men to represent the Uiversity
gan on its big trip throughout the West.
leges and-universities who are sending their
on trips have 30 or 40 men. Such is the
te condition in which the University finds
f funds is the excuse given for not send-
than 12 Glee club and 12 Mandolin club
It has been said that each member who
n the trip must pay for his own meals
.esides. If such is the condition of affairs,
. not have been allowed to go at all; such
onber cannot make a good ehough show-
ly represent the University of Michigan.
>bably too late to cancel the trip, but some
>uld be made to send more men. If some
on would loan the Glee and Mandolin
gh money to send more members, the club
able to pay it back out of the proceeds of

MAKING BOTH ENDS MEET
A considerable amount of interest has been
aroused throughout the country regarding the ef-
fect that increased tuition rates in many of the uni-
versities will have upon students who are paying
part or all of their own expenses. Since the m-
jority of these students only have time to work for
their board or room they have found combatting
the steadily increasing prices growing more and
more difficult.
Authorities of eastern _ institutions recently
placed the cost of a year's attendances at college
between $6oo and $8oo. All things considered, this
estimate is nearer the minimum than the max-
' mum. While the amount needed in a western un-i
versity may be slightly lower, it is safe to say that
no one couk plan on going to school for a year on
a sum much less.
Placed upon his own resources, the working stu-
d-nt is finding that the margin which determines
whether he will go to school or be compelled to
leave has almost been reached. Each added ex-
pense brings the margin closer. Will next fall find
students deprived of a chance to finish their edu-
cation through in ability to meet increased costs?
TO THE THEATERS
An old custom which seems to have died was
that in vogue a few years ago in the' moving pi-
ture houses of Ann Arbor when between shows
they always played the "Victors" and ether old
Michigan pieces such as "Varsity" and "Men of the
Maize and Blue."
After the football season is over the student
body seldom hears these stirring pieces except on
special occasions. Such a .practice in the theate s
would tend to keep the students familiar with the
Michigan battle songs and would also, from the
standpoint of theaters, provide their patrons with
exceptionally lively and pleasing music. It would
cause patrons to leave ina buoyant, happy frame
of mind feeling well pleased with the.performance
just witnessed.
- V-
I he Telescope
. -r
Dear Noah: -
One of my lgs i-a longer than the other so that
I limp quite perceptively. What would you do un-
der 'these circumstances? Worried.
I'm afraid under those same circumstances I
Would limp too.
Our Daily Novelette
-I
A single passenger alighted from the train that
Sunday ,morning. Grasping his suit case in his
hand -he started briskly up the hill which led to the
business setion of the town. He walked ,long for
several blocks without encountering anyone. A lit-
tle perplexed he explained it away on the grounds
that the people were either at church or had not
yet arisen.
TI
But when he reached the business - district the
same phenomena continued. Not a person Was to
be seen. The tread of his shoes on the cement
sidewalks echoed and re-echoed through the ghostly
stillness of the place. A feeling of awe spread over
him.Could it be that this really was a deserted
village? He entered a pool hall. The pool tables
covered with their black cloths were still more de-
pressing.
TIII.
And then as the utter incongruity of the situa-
tion struck him he grinned. A policeman tapped
him on the shoulder at that moment. "Better be
careful," he warned in a very grave voice. The
stran'ger started back. "I beg your pardon, offi-
cer, I did nothing." "I know," replied the officer in
the same serious tone, "but you looked almost as
happy as though-it were Monday." The stranger's
face paled as he realized now what this meant.
Good Heavens! He had forgotten that it was
Sunday in Ann Arbor. J. W. K.

One Friday not so long ago
I cut a whole long day,
And next week went to see the Dean
And explain the cut away.
I'm a conscientious fellow
And always hate to lie,
So I told the Dean I had the grippe
And the excuse got by.
It was the truth, as you shall see
For I was on a trip,
And when I spend the week-end home
I always take the grip.
Jay Whitleaf Greenier.
After John Smith told this one to the Indians
Pocohantas had to intercede for his life.$
First sweet thing-Were there many at :prayer
meeting?
Second ditto-Many? Say, every time the min-
ister said "dearly beloved" I actually blushed.
In the pocket of a burglar in New York they*
found a copy of Milton's "Paradise Lost."'
Let this be a warning to young men as to the
kind of literature they should read.
Famous Closing Lines
"Ha, behind the bars," he muttered as he no-
ticed that the singer did not keep up with accom-
panyist.
NOAH COUNT.

' , . -1

' i

DETROIT UNITED LINES
(Oct. 26, 1919)
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:1o a.
m., and hourly to 9:10 p. in.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. in. (x-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:05 a. in., 9:®5 a.
n. and every two hours to 9:05 p. m., 10:50
v. tn. To Ypsilanti only, .,11:q~ p. mx., s :to
a. n. , and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Ypsilanti,
Local Cars West Bound--7 V48 a. n. and
t2:20 a. m.
Asked At Random
Today's question: Are you in favor
of having a straw ballot in the lit
school on whether or not the honor"
system should-be introduced into this
derartment1"
Ruth Abbott, '20, vice-president of
the senior lit class: "Personally I am
not at all in favor of the honor system
but I believe it would be well to take
a straw vote on the subject, for it is
the only way to get the concensus of
opinion."
Donald J. Porter, '21, Student coun-
cilman: "I don't know much about it
but this is certainly the most practical
way to find out how the students feel
about it. When we find out if the stu-
dents are really behind this move-
ment, it will be time to bring the sub-
ject up before the faculty."
Theodore Adams, '20M, Varsity foot-
ball man: "I think it would be a good
idea to get the lit school's opinion on
this subject and if it is unanimous it
it will be well to take action. Our
class in the medic school has always
been unanimously for the honor sys-
tem, and consequently very successful
in carrying it out."
Tully A. Gross, '21E: "From the
success of the honor system in the
engineering school its success should
be assured in the lit school. If it is
adopted in this school it will probably
lead to its adoption in all the profes-
sional schools, as the lit school is a
forerunner to them. The honor sys-
tem is in existence in all the schools
of the University of Virginia and is,
I understand, a markgd success."
Governors Will Study Coal Problems
Louisville, Ky., April 3.-Governors
of ten coal producing states are ex-
pected to meet in Louisville next sum-
mer to exchange views on placing a
uniform tax on the production of coal
in each state.-;
BIG EASTER DANCE at Masonic
Temple, Ypsilanti, Monday, April .5, -
all students, clerks, society clubs, etc.,
invited. Come single or double. Ike
Fisher's best orchestra. Come down.
-Adv.
Read the Daily for Campus News.
a Ell

i~t11I1It111 111411111[1[111111HIItIII II]HII1i 1 Ii lill lllll f
TENNIS PLAYERRS
We have just. receivd a large shipment of
rrTENNIS RACKETS
And SUPPLIES
Wright and Ditson's Strong Line of
Rackets - . Price $2.00 to-$15.00
IBOOKSTORES
George Did It George Did It
IH111F 111111111HHI:11111HIH:111111111111HIII1i'1111tHI111111111 1u1 1t11 111t11 11 ti
J. L. CHAPMAN ANN ABOROP S~I!!
JEWELER Excellent CHOP SUEY from
113 SOUTH MAIN STREET Steaks and Chops 314 . tote
999TAXI -99
A DODGE CAR AND,
1006E SERVICE,_.
I.- . ENOUGH SAID. X
999

EASTER

GREETING CARDS

(

AT

TWO
STORE'S

GRA H AM'S
BOTH ENDt OF THE DIAGONAL WALK
"george Did It"

TWO
STORES

,

t

.,
)

1

A1

,

SCHOOL OF
DANCING

Private lessons in modern
ball-room dancing.

COPYRIGHT 1920
UMRSK.WICKWIRE CO.

JEANETTE
KRUSZKA

I

Studio
516 E. William St.
Phone 1422-J
Residence Phone 1780-W

ANALYZE the clothes offered you. Insist on
fine woolens and especially on hand tailoring.
If you do this, we know that you will choose -

I

HIRSH,
WICKWIRE

Things cooked as you like them
1 Minute Service for Breakfast
"GOOD EATS"
609 EAST WILLIAM
MENU includes
Bread and Butter
Tea, Coffee, Milk
Potatoes, Dessert
Sbup=-Cream of Chicken, Rice
Roast Stuffed Spring Chicken,
Cranberry Sauce.........75c
Braised Loin of Pork
with Apple Fritters......40c
Roast Lamb, Apple Jelly....40c
Roast Leg of Veal, Celery
Dressing... ... .40c
Roast Sirloin of Beef ....35ec
Mashed Potatoes
Combination Salad
Deep .Pineapple Cream Pie
Regular Meals Sunday Night

I

CLOTHES:

a

I

because the fabrics are finer and there is more hand-
tailoring in them than in any other -clothing-ready
to wear.

I

WAGNER & CO.

303-305 SOUTH STATE

I

the Uni-

'" , _

._

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